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Fisher-Brinton family papers

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Held at: Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College [Contact Us]500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 19081

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in their reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

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Abraham Fisher (1823-1909) was one of seventeen children of Abraham Fisher (1783-1871) and Jane Moor Fisher (1789-1877), Quakers of Youghal County, Ireland. The Fisher family was well-known for its extensive business, philanthropic, peace, and educational activities. An older sister, Anna Maria Fisher Hasham (1829-1922) and her husband Thomas. J. Hasham (1825-1917) were prominent in the woman's suffrage movement in Ireland. The elder Abraham Fisher (1783-1871) was active in anti-slavery and temperance efforts and traveled with Sarah and John Grubb in their ministry to Scotland in 1803 and later with William Forster.

Abraham Fisher (1823-1909) married Sarah Wright (1822-1886) in 1850, and they had nine children: Maria (1851-1939), Anna (1852-1937), Thomas W. (1853-1940), Sarah Moor (1856-1945), William J. (1859-1885), Henry W. (1861-1937), Elizabeth (1863-1935), Susanna G. (1865-1956), and Eleanor (1868-1958)). Abraham worked in his family's mills and import company until financial miscalculations about the corn market in the American Civil War put the firm into bankruptcy. Abraham assumed a position as book-keeper for the Alexandra Colony, an English settlement in Argentina on the San Javier River in a land grant acquired by Thomson, T. Bonar and Company, of London. As a result of the financial corruption in the management of the Colony, in 1874 the family moved to Dymond City, North Carolina, where Abraham worked as manager of a rail and lumber company. The family was received on certificate of transfer from Cork Monthly Meeting, Ireland, to Perquimans Monthly Meeting on 12 month 4, 1875. Both Abraham and Sarah Fisher served as overseers, and Abraham was acknowledged was as a minister. When the English investors ended their support, the Fishers were left with a farm and no connecting railway. Their sons had moved to north and a son William died in 1885 at the age of 26. In failing health, Sarah Fisher returned to visit family in Ireland the following year, where she died and was buried. In 1896 a disastrous fire that killed the livestock and destroyed Abraham's livelihood instigated his move with his unmarried daughters to Malvern, Pennsylvania. Eldest son Thomas W, Fisher and daughter Anna with son-in-law Charles Grimshaw had become active members of Goshen Monthly Meeting.

Almost all the children of Abraham and Sarah Fisher were very involved Quakers, serving as elders and ministers. Anna, Thomas, and Sarah maintained plain dress. The eldest, Maria (1851-1939) married Henry F. Nolan in 1877 at Perquiman Monthly Meeting. He had worked with her father in Argentina. Maria subsequently married Louis Cutrell in 1902, and third, Richard Hampton. Anna (1852-1937) married Charles Grimshaw in 1878 and served as an Elder and Clerk for Goshen Monthly Meeting. The eldest son, Thomas W. Fisher (1853-1940) married first Anna Schaller in 1890, then A. Ruth Smedley in 1896 under the care of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting (Orthodox), and third, Anna Copeland. He was a successful West Chester, Pennsylvania, businessman and a member and acknowledged minister of Holly Springs Monthly Meeting (Conservative), North Carolina. Sarah M. Fisher married Frederic White in 1899; she was a member of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Western District and an acknowledged minister. They lived in West Philadelphia until Frederic's retirement to Penfield, Pennsylvania. The second son, William J. Fisher (1859-1885) had transferred to Birmingham Monthly Meeting in 1885 and died unmarried the same year. The youngest son, Henry W. Fisher (1861-1937) married Harriett Wixon. He was a graduate of Cornell University and successful electrical engineer who lived in St. Petersburg, Florida, in retirement. Elizabeth D. Fisher (1863-1935) married Nathan Eugene Mizell in 1906. They lived in Malvern and were members of Goshen Monthly Meeting. Susanna G. Fisher (1865-1956), a writer and editor, lived with her sister in Penfield Township and in her later years, resided with her younger sibling, Eleanor Peet Fisher. She served as an Elder in Philadelphia Monthly Meeting, Western District. Eleanor (1868-1958) married David Brinton in 1901 under the care of Birmingham Monthly Meeting. His family had roots in Pennsylvania beginning in the years of Penn's Colony.

David Brinton (1864-1945) was descended from William and Ann Bagley Brinton who emigrated to America in 1684. Their great-grandson, Moses Brinton, bought a large tract of land in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Moses married Elinor Vernon in 1747 under the care of Sadsbury Monthly Meeting. Their grandson, William Brinton (1785-1878) married Gulielma Cooper, and they owned a farm in Lampeter where they raised five children. Joseph Brinton (1828-1917) was the middle child. He attended Westtown School and was an assistant teacher in 1849. Brinton moved to Newport, Rhode Island, in 1851. He lived in the household of Thomas B. Gould, a prominent Wilburite minister, and was employed in his mill.

Joseph became an outspoken member of the Society of Friends and was active in the Wilburite schisms of the 1850s and 1860's in New England. He was appointed Clerk of Rhode Island Monthly Meeting (Conservative) in the early 1860's, but returned to Pennsylvania in 1863. Nonetheless, he continued to meet for worship and business in his own home and retained the records of the Meeting until after 1867. He was disowned by Nantucket Monthly Meeting in 1866 although he disputed the authority of the Annual Meeting in New England which had laid down Rhode Island into Nantucket.

Before his return to Pennsylvania, Joseph married Mary Homans Howland (1833-1870) in a Friends ceremony in Newport, Rhode Island. She was the daughter of David Purinton Howland (1809-1852) and Anna Robinson Howland (1804-1855) of Vassalboro, Maine. Anna Robinson was the daughter of Timothy and Salome Kennard Robinson, members of Windham Monthly Meeting, Maine. Timothy's father had settled in Windham, operating a tanner which Timothy assumed and also manufactured shoes. They had seven children including Oliver Robinson (1812-1890) who married Sarah Tabor. He operated a successful shoe manufacturing company in the town. The Howlands and Robinson were successful merchants and active in the Wilburite controversy that split New England Yearly Meeting. David P. Howland was a business partner with William Hill who owned a successful woolen mill in North Berwick, Maine.

Mary H. Brinton died in 1870 shortly after the birth of her fifth child. A year later, Joseph married her sister, Anna M. Howland (1843-1926) despite the initial disapproval of his family. Joseph and Anna Brinton had five children of their own. The family first lived on the family farm in Lancaster County and then purchased a farm (Timicula, later renamed Glen Rose/Glenrose) near Ercildoun in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1871. He was a dairy farmer and operated a mill. Joseph rejoined Friends at Ercildoun from 1882 with a certificate from South Kingston Monthly Meeting, but resigned again in 1896 because he thought Philadelphia Yearly Meeting was too conciliatory to the Gurneyites. He died of a stroke in 1917 at the age of 89.

David Brinton (1864-1945) was the son of Joseph's first wife, Mary Howland Brinton. Born in Ercildoun, he attended Westtown School, then Cornell and University of Pennsylvania. He worked in his father's creamery and mill and became postmaster of Timicula post office and a justice of the peace. In 1920 he joined the West Chester business of his brother-in-law Thomas J. Fisher. In 1901 he married Eleanor Fisher (1868-1958) under the care of Birmingham Monthly Meeting. Their son William Fisher Brinton was born in Glenrose, Pennsylvania, in 1909 and died in 2008. He graduated from Westtown in 1927 and from Haverford College in 1932. An inveterate traveler, he worked as a writer and photo-journalist. He taught at various Quaker schools, was involved with Quaker workcamps, Pendle Hill, and the early Youth Hostel movement in the United States. In 1941 he was drafted for alternative service, first at Patapsco, Maryland, and then Big Flats, New York. After his marriage to E. Louise Irwin (1915-2004) in 1949, he attended library school and worked at public libraries, Haverford College Library, and briefly at the Swarthmore College Peace Collection where his cousin, Anna Brinton, was curator.

The Fisher-Brinton collection contains the papers of an Irish-American and Pennsylvania family with roots in the earliest years of the Society of Friends. It includes correspondence, diaries, memoirs, photographs, scrapbooks, and other materials that reflect family and Quaker concerns, and, in particular, the Conservative branch of the Society of Friends. Abraham Fisher (1823-1909) was a member of a prominent Quaker family of Youghal County, Ireland. In 1871, he assumed a position as book-keeper for the Alexandra Colony, an English settlement on the San Javier River in rural Argentina. Unaware of the increasing violence in the region, his wife and children joined him in early 1872. In 1874 the family moved to Dymond City, North Carolina, and eventually, to Southeastern Pennsylvania. The family had a deep appreciation for their family history and Irish roots, continuing through the twentieth century; Abraham's great-granddaughter, Margaret E. Brinton, attended a small Irish boarding school in the mid-1960s.

Abraham Fisher's youngest daughter, Eleanor Peet Fisher, married David P. Brinton in 1901, thus uniting the Fisher and Brinton families. He was a descendant of William Brinton who emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1684. His father, Joseph Brinton, born on the family farm in Lancaster County, was active in the Wilburite schisms of the 1850s and 1860's in New England where he married Mary Homans Howland in Newport, Rhode Island. The Howlands were prominent Quaker businessmen in Maine. A grandson, William Fisher Brinton, was a conscientious objector in WWII. Many members of the extended families served as elders and ministers, and a number of them affiliated with the Conservative Yearly Meetings.

Arranged in four series

Gift of Margaret Brinton Collinson, 2020

To be added to FHL stacks:

Biographical Sketch of the Life of Taulerus by Peter Lossing, Philadelphia, 1829 [Inscribed in front cover Susan Brinton's book]

Gleanings for the Memory, Philadelphia (Kimber Co.), 1808 [Inscribed in front cover Gulielma Brinton]

Collection of Problems, Kimber and Sharples, 1842 [Inscribed in front cover Joseph Brinton]

Memoirs of the Lives of Benjamin Lay, Phila., 1815 [Inscribed in front cover Joseph Brinton. 3rd copy but rare and has a color illustration of Lay]

Map of the United States [1884] Add to maps

Child's Story of Jesus' Friends, by Susanna G. Fisher, Phila. 1936. [Inscribed in front cover by author]

Relics to be cataloged:

Games used by family Old eyeglasses Watches Button-making paddle and leather tools Chalk board used for children's lessons. According to William F. Brinton, he and his siblings were home-schooled through middle school and then sent to Westtown

300 year old plate carried from Ireland to Argentina, then to N.C. and PA. Second smaller plate. Letter explaining history filed in RG5/322 with photocopy stored with plates.

Photographs removed to Fisher-Brinton Picture Collection, PA 215

Publisher
Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College
Finding Aid Author
Susanna Morikawa
Finding Aid Date
July 2020
Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions

Friends Historical Library believes all of the items in this collection to be in the Public Domain in the United States, and is not aware of any restrictions on their use. However, the user is responsible for making a final determination of copyright status before reproducing. See http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/.

Collection Inventory

Emigration to the Argentine Republic, Alexandra Colony. Pamphlet, 1871.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Sales brochure from developers of the Alexandra Colony, London. Advertising a tract of land acquired on west bank of San Javier River in the province of Saanta Fe by J. Thomson, T. Bonar and Company for development.

Abraham Fisher to Christopher Weylin (copy), 1871-10-10.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Fisher's account of the death of a fellow emigrant to Argentina, Andrew Weylin, who was lanced by a native. The notification was sent to victim's brother.

Abraham Fisher diary, 1873.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Covers the trips from Alexandria Colony to England, then U.S. and North Carolina. With a rough itinerary compiled by his daughter Eleanor Fisher Brinton and a photograph of the family in North Carolina.

Notes from the diary of Anna Fisher Grimshaw, 1871-1872, 1934.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Anna (1852-1937) was the second eldest of the Fisher children. She married Charles Grimshaw in 1878 in North Carolina. About 1899, they moved to Malvern, Pennsylvania. Anna served as an elder and clerk for Goshen Monthly Meeting. The diary contains excerpts from her diary of the trip to Argentina in December 1871 to 1872. Typed carbon on the reverse of scrap paper dated 1934.

The Life of Thomas W. Fisher , undated.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Typed transcript memoir of his childhood, life in Argentina, and travel to the United States. Thomas (1853-1940) was the third child, eldest son. He and his brothers were educated in Ireland and assumed responsibility for the family farm and care of younger siblings until his father directed him to sell it and follow him to South America. Typed addendum by Eleanor Fisher Brinton adds entries from Sarah's diary which supplied specific dates. Thomas was a member of Goshen Monthly Meeting and an acknowledged minister of Holly Spring Friends Meeting, North Carolina, an independent meeting for worship.

Sarah M. Fisher White diary, 1874-1876 (transcript), 1874-1875, 1876.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Sarah Moor Fisher (1856-1945) married Frederic White in 1899 and was acknowledged as a minister by Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Western District. Her journal includes details about the voyage from South America, the family's life aboard ship and eventual arrival in North Carolina. Faded typed transcript, photocopies. Her younger sister Susanna wrote a biography of Sarah Moor White published in The Friend, 6 mo. 6, 1951.

Letter from Davis H. Forsythe, Philadelphia, to Sarah M. White, 1922-05-22.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Editor of The Friend, inviting her to submit a manuscript.

Henry W. Fisher writings, 1916, 1929, undated.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

"Primitive Life in the Gran Chaco Argentine Republic" typed carbon. Henry (1861-1937) was the youngest son and a child when the family moved to Argentina. The editing is in hand of his sister, Eleanor Brinton. 1916 letter from Buenos Aires described the Alexandria Colony, founded in 1870. .

Autobiography of Henry Fisher, undated, circa 1935.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

2 copies with photographs glued onto first page. The donor noted that Henry's account is most complete of the siblings memoirs. Also a mimeograph copy of trip of Henry and wife Hattie Fisher to St. Petersburg, Florida. Henry attended Cornell University and was an engineer and avid supporter of Esperanto. He married Harriett Wixon.

A Backward Look - family history, by Susanna Fisher.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Susanna G. Fisher (1865-1956) was second youngest of the nine children and a small child when the family lived in Argentina. In a typed essay, she explained that since the family lived remotely, they took great interest in family stories that were handed down. She took a particular interest in consolidating the family's history. Like her sister Sarah, she was a member and elder of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Western District.

Fisher Family by Susanna G. Fisher, circa 1942.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Typed manuscript family history including the family in Ireland, descended from Reuben and Joan Fisher. Also aAn appendix on her father's character and the fire in the North Carolina homestead. Carbons copies, tied with string. Susanna G. Fisher (1865-1956), second youngest of the nine children and a small child when the family lived in Argentina, explained that since the family lived remotely, they took great interest in family stories that were handed down. She was a writer and editor, the only daughter who did not marry. She moved with her father and two sisters moved to Pennsylvania in 1898.

Miscellaneous notes compiled by Susanna G. Fisher, circa 1945.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Includes a yearly record of Fisher family events 1871-1939. Biographical information about her siblings and other family members. Susanna was a writer and family historian and lived with the donor's parents in late life. The material is typed or handwritten on scrap papers.

Reminiscences of Argentina by Eleanor Fisher Brinton, 1949.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Typed carbon written by Eleanor Fisher (1868-1958), youngest child, with her impressions of the environment and local natives. Also copies with translation of a description of Fishers' home in Argentina from a book by William Wilcken, 1872, described as the only home without firearms.

Photograph of the family in North Carolina, circa 1885.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Group photograph of the family outside their home in Megessa. Labeled on reverse.

"Our Family," Fisher family scrapbook, Ca. 1909-1948.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Compiled by Susanna Fisher [and Eleanor?] Contains clippings, memorials, genealogical tables, etc., on family members including Anna M. Haslam. Included are published articles by William F. Brinton and a printed memorial for Thomas Wright Fisher by Holly Springs Monthly Meeing, North Carolina. Also original loose material, dated 1850-1930s: A. J. Grimshaw letters; condolence letters concerning deaths of Elizabeth and Nathan Mizell, etc.

[Abraham Fisher (1783-1871)] Journal of trip, London Yearly Meeting, 1828.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Quaker separations in the United States, J. J. Gurney. and education. Identified in the family as the journal of Abraham Fisher (1783-1871), the father of Abraham, the immigrant. Abraham, Sr., accompanied John and Sarah Grubb and William Forster in their ministries in the early 19th century. He was a corn merchant in Youghal and insurance agent for Friends Provident Institution and other companies. He and wife Jane Moor Fisher had seventeen children and were involved in a myriad of philanthropic work including famine relief. After business reversals in the late 1860s they emigrated to Wales where they died.

Abraham Fisher (1783-1871) correspondence, 1850, 1853.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Abraham Fisher to Hannah Rhodes, 1850 8 mo. 18, concerning her plan to visit to Europe. Rhodes was a Philadelphia Quaker minister, and Fisher wrote that his wife would like to accompany her if she included Ireland in her travels. Manuscript copy letter Abraham Fisher, Sr., to Edward Jefferis, Youghal, 1853, concerning his Quaker faith and large family that included 17 children.

Abraham Fisher calligraphy book, undated.
Box 2
Pencil sketch of Abraham Fisher, 1908.
Box 2
Related Materials

Drawn by Stephen J. Ferris

Deeds to property in North Carolina, 1876.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Washington Railroad and Lumber Company, an English investment company, to Abraham Fisher

Sarah Wright Fisher album, 1846-1850.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Sarah Wright married Abraham Fisher in 1850. The title page includes the signature of her youngest daughter Eleanor P. F. Brinton. Inside cover has Sarah's signed temperance pledge. Contain list of books read, poetry (words to songs?), and note from mother to her children.

Sarah Fisher, Magessa, North Carolina, to daughters at Westtown, 1882-06-18.
Box 1
Scope and Contents

Family news

Extracts of letter by Sarah Fisher describing illness and death of son William Joseph Fisher, 1885.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Typed extracts. William (1859-1885) had moved to Pennsylvania where he started a plant nursery. He was visiting family in North Carolina where he died, probably from tuberculosis.

Extracts of letters concerning Sarah Wright Fisher, 1886.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Fragile, some letters from Sarah written sent from Cork, Ireland. She was in poor health and sailed home to visit her family in Ireland where she died. She is buried in Cork.

Anna Grimshaw and Henry Fisher "What is Creation", undated.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Tydped carbon copies of rhyming letter sent between the siblings, transcript by Susanna G. Fisher

Sarah M. Fisher commonplace book, with Eleanor F. Brinton and Margaret additions, 1882-1900; 1950, 2010.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Hard bound volume contains autographs and entries written for Sarah. Sarah M. Fisher (1856-1945) married Frederic White in 1899 and was a Quaker minister. Her youngest sister Eleanor later added a brief history of the family and her (Eleanor's) life before her marriage in 1901. Eleanor recounted the family's move to Malvern, Pennsylvania, in 1898 where she met the Brinton relatives and married David Brinton on 9 month 26. In 1950 when she was bedridden Eleanor wrote a short addition which included her memories of Magessa, North Carolina. Also some poems by her sister Susanna. The final entry is by the donor, Margaret Brinton Collinson. She wrote that her family lived with her grandmother Eleanor Brinton until 1957.

Elizabeth Fisher trip journal, 1893.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Pocket diary journal of trip to New York World's Fair. Elizabeth (1863-1935) married Nathan Eugene Mizell, and they were active members of Goshen Monthly Meeting.

Our Wright Ancestor, by Susanna G. Fisher , undated.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

An informal history of the family of her mother, Sarah Wright, with an affectionate recollection of her mother. The Wrights were early members of the Society of Friends in Ireland. Also photocopy of handwritten copy of family history by Samuel Wright (1820-1898).

Henry Peele Nolan, by Susanna G. Fisher, 1945.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Photocopy of a typescript. Nolan (1840-1893) was the first husband of Maria Fisher (1851-1939], the eldest of the Fisher children. He was also Irish by birth and met the family in Argentina where he had worked in various jobs and became a manager at the Colony. He left Argentina at the same time as the Fishers and eventually came to North Carolina to work for the railroad and lumber company. He joined the Society of Friends meeting a Piney Woods, He and Maria married in 1877. Susanna explained that she recorded his life so that his children could appreciate his adventurous personality and exploits before illness and hard times in North Carolina.

Miscellaneous Fisher family stories and chronology, undated, circa 1945.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Includes typed copy of a newspaper account of the wedding of Anna and Charles Grimshaw in 1878; excerpt of a letter dated 5 month 1897 from Sarah M. Fisher describing the barn fire in North Carolina; consolidated chronology of the Fisher family from 1850 to 1945.

Children's stories by Susanna G. Fisher , 1936, circa 1930s.
Box 2
Scope and Contents

Susanna Georgina Fisher (1865-1956) was an editor and writer and served as an Elder in Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Western District. Carbons and mimeographed short stories and copy of her published book, A Child's Story of Jesus' Friends, signed by author for her sister, Eleanor Brinton. [2nd copy to stacks. Photos enclosed]

The Silver Flute : The Writers' Club of Delaware County, 1952.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Includes poems by Susanna G. Fisher, loose poems and a photograph of the old Brinton home on State Road, south of Phoenixville, which William F. and Louise Brinton had purchased. Book was from their library.

Susanna Fisher stamp collection.
Box 3
Susanna G. Fisher loose collected stamps .
Box 3
Susanna G. Fisher birthday book, Whittier Birthday Book , circa 1900-1980 .
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Family births and information kept by Susanna G. Fisher. Index at end and loose note written by W. F. Brinton.

Eleanor Fisher commonplace book, 1885-1886.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Poems by hRer siblings and others, copied into volume with some later additions, undated. Also receipts and grades, Westtown School.

Memoirs of a Quaker Childhood in Ireland and Pennsylvania by Louisa M. Jacob, circa 1957.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

A note written by that donor explained that members of the Jacobs family intermarried with the Fisher family. Louisa Jacobs was Philadelphia-area Quaker teacher who had lived in Germany before WWII and later was active in German relief.

Some reminiscences of Limerick Friends, by Ernest H. Bennis, 1930.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Stories about members of the Fisher, Jacob, and other Quaker families

Joseph Steer instructions concerning property, 1764.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Instruction from seller of Lancaster County property regarding sale to Moses Brinton.

[William Brinton] travel journal [photocopy and handwritten transcript], 1818.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

1818 Identified by William F. Brinton as likely the journal of his grandfather, William Brinton (1785-1878), a Lancaster County farmer. He transcribed the journal with the title: 1818 Diary: A trip to Niagara Falls by a simple Lancaster Co. farmer in 1818/WFB

Gulielma Brinton to Joseph Brinton, Newport, Rhode Island, 1852, 1854.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Letters from his mother and his sister, Cassie (Cassandra).

Minute from Rhode Island YM approving Joseph Brinton's accompanying Nathan Page, 1856-09-30.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Minute signed by clerks of Rhode Island Yearly Meeting

Joseph Brinton, Colerain, letter to Martha concerning Ohio Yearly Meeting, 1857.
Box 3
Scope and Contents

Detailed description of the Yearly Meeting. Draft? Labeled. in pencil Wilburite Controversy/Important History. Last page in shorthand.

Joseph and Mary Brinton correspondence, Newport and Ercildoun, ca, 1858-1871.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Largely concerning the Wilburite controversy. Some are likely drafts. Included is a transcript of Samuel Cope's support of John Wilbur.

Mary H. Brinton to Joseph Brinton, 1864 3 month.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Mary Brinton included news of the family, as their infant son David Brinton was in cradle nearby. Also her account of her going from Dartmouth to Newport to attend New England Yearly Meeting. She traveled with Jesse and Mary Tucker Ann Tucker. She added a note that she had met them in the fall of 1848 when she despaired that she might be homeless with no resources, and they offered her a home as a teacher their children.

Joseph Brinton drafts of letters, journal notes, 1865.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Faded and difficult to read.

Joseph Brinton, Ercildoun, to Amos C. Wilbur, 1872-05-13.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Brinton wrote that he would provide any specific information upon request, but that he was unwilling to send the record books of the Yearly Meeting which he had taken with him to Pennsylvania.

Joseph Brinton, letter to Cousin Lydia, 1894-08-07.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Apparently in reaction to her rejection of his family's home and faith. According to the donor, Lydia had been homeschooling his children.

Joseph Brinton to J. A. Sargent, 1897-10-30.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Words of encouragement to follow Quaker tradition

Joseph Brinton, Newport, to Abraham Lincoln (copy), 1861-12-13.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Manuscript copy, incomplete. Written as if speaking as a minister, urging the President to pray for guidance.

Joseph Brinton, account of visit to Abraham Lincoln, transcriptions , 1965.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Transcribed from diary of Joseph Brinton, typed transcript and published in Friends Journal, May 15, 1965, with illustrations by Eileen Waring.

Joseph Brinton account books (4), 1858-1862.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Pocket sized account books, Newport. Joseph Brinton, son of William and Gulielma Brinton, lived in Newport, Rhode Island, from 1851-1863, working in the mill of Thomas B. Gould.

Joseph Brinton accounts and miscellaneous, 1885.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Labeled on cover [by son David Brinton] 1885/ Father's notes on activities. Includes accounts, remarks on food, etc.

Sketch book, undated.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Identified by grandson William F. Brinton as possibly Joseph Brinton's or belonging to son Charles.

Mary Brinton Hopkins diary, circa 1860-1883.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Mary Brinton (1831-1926), younger sister of Joseph Brinton, married Joseph J. Hopkins in 1861. Her diary is rich with family detail, Quaker meetings and ministers. In entries before 6 month 1864, the ink is badly faded and difficult to decipher. Beginning 1864, visits to family and friends, Quaker meetings. 7 mo. 1864, funeral of Uncle Joseph in the meeting house at East Sadsbury with large meetings of people from various denominations. Thomas Whitson and Horatio Cooper spoke. Entry of 7 mo. 29, tax collectors came to collect military fine. Joseph Hopkins refused and was threatened with prison. A mare and colt were confiscated. Attending worship, monthly (mostly Fallowfield) and quarterly meetings, visits from Ohio and New England Friends. Attended General Meeting in Philadelphia in December. 1865 Quaker notes, including preaching by her husband, brother Joseph, visit of James Kite and others. After a long gap, she wrote that she had stayed with Mary H. Brinton for final weeks of her life. Before her death, Mary asked her sister Anna to care for her children. Anna became Joseph Brinton's second wife.o Mary and Joseph Hopkins lived near Gap, Lancaster County. The family practiced as Wilburite/Conservative Quakers, and the family worshipped in their home several times a week where Joseph would lead worship.

Susanna Brinton (1833-1927) commonplace book, 1852-1883.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Miniature volume, "presented by my sister Jane...1852." Poems and sentimental notes that include 1883 entries by Jane Brinton Smith and the extended family. Susanna was the youngest of William and Gulielma Brinton's children.

Article in Pennsylvania Folklife by Don Yoder featuring Susanna Brinton, 1964, July.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

"Memories of Three Spring Farms" includes two sketches by Susanna Brinton of the farm in Lancaster County where she grew up. Yoder wrote that she was a plain Quaker her entire long life and supported suffrage and education. She gave a building as a residence for teachers at Cheyney University and a building at Women's Medical College in Philadelphia.

David Brinton diary and scrapbook, circa 1890-1945.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

A detailed compilation of entries copied from his father's diaries and David Brinton's own reminiscences and current diary entries. He was raised as a Conservative/Wilburite Quaker, a member of Fallsington Friends at Ercildoun. Biographies of family and friends, his opinions on politics (was much against the "New Deal.") Includes tipped in correspondence, clippings. Brinton wrote about his father's disownment for marrying the sister of his deceased wife and the family's isolation from local Friends. Very rich and includes family bible records and reference to Ercildoun being a station on the Underground Railroad and African Americans who settled there. His own topical index at the end, with additions by his wife, Eleanor Fisher Brinton, after his death.

"A Portrait of a Father," by William Fisher Brinton, 1940.
Box 4
Scope and Contents

Two essays about his father, David P. Brinton, and his unease with changing times.

Eleanor Fisher Brinton journal, 1902-1908.
Box 5
Scope and Contents

Diary of milestones of her children

Eleanor Fisher Brinton journals , 1952-circa 1957.
Box 5
Scope and Contents

6 small volumes, family and daily activities as her health failed

Eleanor Fisher Brinton pocket diaries (3), 1952-1958.
Box 5
Scope and Contents

Pocket diaries. The 1953 was a gift from her daughter, Sarah W. Brinton and includes a partial draft of her reminiscences of Argentina and a snapshot of Eleanor and David Brinton (?) pasted inside cover. Also miscellaneous notes and fragments.

Eleanor Fisher Brinton scrapbook, #1, ca. 1914-1936.
Box 5
Scope and Contents

Largely clippings, family and poems, etc., of interest

Eleanor Fisher Brinton scrapbook, #2, circa 1932-1949.
Box 5
Scope and Contents

Includes drawings and paintings by Anna Fisher Grimshaw, greeting cards from daughter Eileen, sister Susanna, and brother Henry with wife Hattie; family clippings, published poems by Susanna Fisher; prints, cartoons, and drawings by Eileen Brinton; published stories by William F. Brinton.

Sarah W. Brinton stories , 1917, undated, and 1960 .
Box 5
Scope and Contents

Sarah W. Brinton (1902-1997) was the eldest of David and Eleanor Brinton's four children. Two handwritten and illustrated stories written as a child. Also a 1960 note to her brother and sister-in-law, William F. and Louise Brinton, describing her visit to the Moses Brinton farm in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Mary Eileen Brinton journals, 1916.
Box 5
Scope and Contents

Mary Eileen Brinton (1904-1995) was the second child. Daily entries which record high and low temperatures, school, family and activities. Volume, in two pieces. Acidic, very fragile and some pages crumbling.

Mary Eileen Brinton journals, 1917-1918.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

Daily entries which record high and low temperatures, school, family and activities. She mentions the flu epidemic, War, and Wilson leaving for Europe in December 1918 to attend Treat of Versailles. Two volumes, acidic, very fragile and some pages crumbling. Excerpts from 1916-1918 in her handwriting.

M. Eileen Brinton Waring Five Year Diary, 1946-1950, 1934-1950.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

Daily entries, by date, each year in a "Five Year Diary." Also fragment of European travel diary circa early 1930s, identifed on folder as written in Eileen's handwriting. Eileen Brinton married Arthur Waring in 1947. Eileen Brinton Waring, whose drawings illustrating "Four Friends Drop in on Lincoln" (excerpts from her grandfather's journal) appeared in the Friends Journal of May 15, 1965, is a New York (formerly Philadelphia) Friend and artist. Her report on the conference and vigil in Washington is augmented by several paragraphs taken from another report written by Sally Honan, also a New York Friend, Friends Journal March 15, 1966]

Sketches, paper folding, circa 1947.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

With a letter from the editor Of American Baptist, Department of Sunday School publications, to M. Eileen Brinton.

William Fisher Brinton diary, 1933.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

Daily entries, school and vacations

William F. Brinton travel diaries , ca. 1932-1940.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

Florida, California, Mexico, Canada, England, etc. Bill Brinton loved travel, often with his brother Arthur. In November 1940 he noted that he was preparing his questionnaire for the draft notice. Also loose, brief entries removed from small notebooks; he wondered if he would ever settle down (brother Art married in 1940). Snapshots of camping in Californis, 1932

Arthur and William F. Brinton, travel correspondence to family, 1935-07-1935-08.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

Handwritten letters from England and Ireland. Includes hand drawn map of their cycling in Ireland

Scenes from Woodbrooke, printed as postcards from Brinton's photographs, 1935.
Box 6
Scope and Contents

Many are identified by Brinton. Also donor's note remarking on the variety of topics, courses, and visitors at Woodbrooke from many European countries including Germany.

William F. Brinton, The Scribble-in Book , 1935, 2004.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Hardbound notebook travel journal of his trip to England and Scotland as a student. Additional notes at end by Brinton after his 2004 stroke and by daughter Margaret. Also, a letter dated 22 August, Dumfries, Scotland from William Brinton to his father, with travel details.

William F. Brinton letter to family, 1936.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

A long letter recounted his experiences in work camps in Europe, Woodbrooke. Includes a brochure, Volunteer Work Camp, Summer 1937, published by the AFSC in cooperation with the Emergency Peace Campaign.

William F. Brinton notes on teaching and photography, 1936-1937,1938-1948.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Notes on teaching at Media Friends School, Media, Pennsylvania. Interesting brief entry Jan/Feb. 1937 referred to meeting of the Committee concerning admission of an African American child to the nursery or kindergarten. They decided to defer the matter to a discussion by the teachers. Remainder of book records his photography work 1938-1948.

William F. Brinton notes on youth hostels, 1938.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Typed and handwritten

American Youth Hostel article and handbooks, 1938.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Brinton's article, "A Shilling a Night" with photographs was published in Philadelphia Presbyterian Magazine. Published guides

American Youth Hostels, Inc., diploma , 1944.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Issued to William F. Brinton for having met the requirements of the AYH Training School as established in the 1944 Handbook

William F. Brinton letters to parents, 1938-1939.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Letters to family while working on hostels, his article submitted by American Youth Hostels, Inc.

William F. Brinton, Chapter of a Life Saga, 1932-1940, undated.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

"Restlessness." Draft for his autobiography. His theme for this chapter of his early adulthood was youthful restlessness. "How to travel on little." He loved to travel and was involved in the hostel movement. Handwritten on very acidic paper.

An Introduction to Work Camps by Richard Gothe, 1940.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Note on cover by Brinton that the volume was used as reference for comparison with Quaker and CPS camps

William F. Brinton journals , 1938-1942.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Brief entries removed from small notebooks; also miscellaneous notes of interest

Notebook on Pendle Hill program on Cooperatives, 1941-1942.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Notes on organizing and running cooperatives. Loose in volume: an account of attending a Coop Conference in Wisconsin, 6 mo. 27 to 7 month 1 and his travel to Michigan. Brinton attended many sessions at Pendle Hill from the 1920s and throughout his lifetime. Includes nNotes on history of Pendle Hill

William F. Brinton C.O. correspondence, 1941-06-1941-12.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

Brinton was among the first conscientious objectors to be assigned to Camp #3, Patapsco, Maryland which opened 4 month 1941 and closed 9 month. In a letter dated 6 month 14, he described his day, Friends who visited to tour the camp, and his thoughts on alternative service which though not managed efficiently was better than prison or military service. He expected his service to be only a year and was a released in September. He went to NYC to work on Co-ops and lived in a cooperative apartment in Greenwich Village.

William F. Brinton clippings concerning his C.O. service, 1941.
Box 7
Scope and Contents

William F. Brinton was assigned in May 1941 for a year of alternative service in Patapsco State Forest, Maryland. Administered by the AFSC, it was the U.S.'s first government-approved civilian service camp for conscientious objectors . At the time, he was a staff member at Pendle Hill and working as a freelance photographer and writer. He in mentioned and pictured in some of the clippings. After the U.S. entered the War, men in the CPS were required to serve for the duration.

Patapsco Peacemaker newsletter, 1941-1942.
Box 8
CPS Cookbook, with annotation by William F. Brinton, circa 1941.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

The Foreword noted that the cookbook was a project of Friends Cooking School at the CPS camp in Powellville, Maryland.

William F. Brinton letters, 1942-05-1942-06.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Brinton traveled in Michigan and New England. In June he attended a conference on Cooperatives in Wisconsin.

William F. Brinton letters, 1942-08-1942-12.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Letters from Big Flats C.P.S. Camp. Brinton was critical of the AFSC's supervison of the camps, and he served on a committee to suggest better use of manpower.

Notebook, CPS Camp #46, 1942-1943.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Brinton's notes on camp discussion on issues such as labor problems and expectations. The journal begins on August 26, 1942, his first week at Big Flats and contains his detailed assessments. Bayard Rustin, Barnard Walton, and others spoke at the Camp. Brinton presided over camp meetings. He noted efforts to release Japanese Americans from internment camps and that some prisoners had been sent to Chicago. Most of the volume is empty, and the final entry is May 10, 1943, in which he reflected on his leaving the camp and his debt to his aged parents.

William F. Brinton letters, 1943-1944.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Most entries were dated only by month. Brinton continued his criticism of the American Friends Service Committee and their administrative of Civilian Public Service and Selective Services under-utilization of able and willing volunteers. Brinton worked at the Pownal State School, Maine.

William F. Brinton correspondence, 1943-1945.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Includes 1943 correspondence concerning his being reported AWOL when he attended Yearly Meeting without being granted an emergency furlough. 1945 letter from Ruth [Cadbury], Worcester, England, whom he had met at Woodbrooke.

Conscientious Objector reference material, 1941-1949.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Two issues of Grass Roots [C.P.S. Camp #46]; Fellowship of Reconciliation Report on Conscientious Objectors in World War II; typed carbon of list of C.O. publications prepared by William f. Brinton; Directory of Civilian Public Service, 1941-1947,

Typed review of literature on library administration, 1967.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Typed carbons. Brinton studied archival training at the Library of Congress after the War and briefly worked for the Swarthmore College Peace Collection when his cousin Anna Brinton was Curator.

Letter to "Fellow Americans", circa 1972.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Typed carbon of Brinton's letter in opposition to Vietnam War and Richard Nixon

William F. Brinton travel notes, 1973-1983.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Travel notes from road trips

William Fisher Brinton biographical, undated.
Box 8
Scope and Contents

Short biography on her father by Margaret Brinton Collinson and chronological notes on his varied life experiences.

Early memories of William Fisher Brinton and biography, undated.
Scope and Contents

Early memories of Brinton and a short biography by Margaret Brinton Collinson on her father.

Outdoor Handbook by William Fisher Brinton, 1940.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Typed draft

Writings by William Fisher Brinton.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Sorted by the author, topics include travel, cooperatives, work camps

Writings by William Fisher Brinton, 1938-1942 and undated.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Typed drafts on various topics including C.P.S. camps, photography, cycling.

Writings by William Fisher Brinton.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Handwritten and typed drafts

Shell Collection by William Fisher Brinton.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Article with his photographs illustrating

Writings by William Fisher Brinton.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Carbon copies of accepted articles

William F. Brinton address book.
Box 9
Scope and Contents

Most contacts are Quakers, Young Friends, etc.

Directory for Traveling Friends, 1983-1984.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Guide published by Friend General Conference which listed the home of ted the Brintons in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania

Louise Irwin Brinton writings and memorial , 1969, 1996.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Photocopies of her typed autobiography with notes and short stories. Louise Irwin was born in 1915 and graduated from Smith College in 1938. She taught briefly at Germantown Friends School and then attended University of Virginia Law School, one of three women in a class of 300. She graduated in 1943 and served as lead counsel to Secretary of Welfare, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. She married Willim F.Brinton in 1949, raised five children, and worked part-time as a legal research assistant for various Pennsylvania commissions. She was active in Quaker organizations, especially regarding racial concerns, Yearly Meeting committees, and the League of Women Voters. Memorial written by her son Christopher Brinton.

Lt. John Fisher Irwin Civil War letters, 1862-1865.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Typed photocopy, spiral bound with commentary. He was the son of John Irwin, Jr. (1782-1859) who married Mary Fisher under the care of Muncy Monthly Meeting in 1802. With his family, he accompanied the Fishers to Bald Eagle Valley, Centre County, Pennsylvania. He was a birthright Quaker who became a Methodist after his marriage. Also includes the autobiography of his brother Ellis Irwin (1805-1902). A note that the letters had been property of Louise Irwin Brinton and were transcribed and researched by John P. Irwin.

Irwin family Genealogy, 1942.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Compiled by John Robert Irwin and John Lewis Irwin

Margaret Brinton Collinson Irish school letters and notes on American History class, 1966.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Margaret Fisher Brinton Collinson, the daughter of William Fisher Brinton and Louise Irwin Brinton, attended a small Irish Quaker boarding school, Grammar School Drogheda, during her Junior Year Abroad. Her letters reflect a very different academic experience, far from home and technology, located only thirty miles from the Border shortly before "The Troubles" erupted.

Margaret Brinton Collinson school letters, 1967.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Letters to family describe school, travels, and reactions to turbulent events in the U.S.

Margaret E. Brinton, Glenrose drawings and reminiscence, 1974-1978, undated.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Sketches of farm life at Joseph Brinton's Spring Hope Farm, Glenrose, Pennsylvania, where Margaret Brinton, later Collinson, spent weekends as a child.

Margaret Brinton Collinson research and notes, undated and circa 2019-2020.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Margaret Brinton Collinson compiled the Fisher-Brinton Family Papers and included her handwritten notess that add context and biographical information. She explained that she and her parents lived with her grandmother, Eleanor Fisher Brinton, in West Chester after they moved from Glenrose. Her great-aunt Susanna G. Fisher lived nearby. Family stories and heirlooms were preserved by the generations. Among the relics is the 1728 plate [removed to FHL Relics] which had belonged to her belonged to her great-grandmother Sarah Wright Fisher who kept it with her in her as she moved to Argentina and Pennsylvania. The file includes correspondene from cousin Rebecca Fisher Schneider who also researched the family.

Brinton miscellaneous memorabilia, postcards, ca. 1990-1930s.
Box 10
Scope and Contents

Sorted from Brinton photographs. Includes 1930s anti-war postcards, postcards of memorials, postcard series of Lover's Lane, Saint Jo by Eugene Field, miscellaneous greeting cards, and photo of Bill Brinton on bike in England/Greeting for New Year 1938. Also an envelope of "Old Money."

O. R. [Oliver Robinson], Windham, Maine, to David P. Howland, 1836-08-19.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Largely family and some business news. Oliver Robinson (1812-1890) was a younger brother of Anna Robinson Howland. He was a successful Windham, Maine, manufacturer and member of Windham Monthly Meeting.

David P. Howland, Newport, to Anna Howland, 1839-06-15.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

The letter to his wife gave an account of attending New England Yearly Meeting and the Friends in attendance. He traveled from Vassalboro to Boston with a night spent in Bath. Shopping and dinner with Joseph Southwick, Anti-slavery and abolition conversation in Boston, then continued to Providence, Rhode Island, with a visit to the School.

C.H., Windham, Maine, to Anna Howland, 1844-02-19.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Addressed to Dear Sister, the letter contains family news and comments on the tensions in the Society.

William Hill, North Berwick, to David P. Howland, 1844-1845.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Financial matters. William Hill operated a successful shoe manufacturing business in North Berwick. He and Howland were business partners in mnay ventures and also shared the same conservative approach to Quaker worship.

William Hill to David Howland, 1845-11-01.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Hill reported on events at the Quarterly Meeting and the formation of a smaller Conservative Yearly Meeting, He remarked that he and his wife were holding a school in their home for their children, and he invited Anna to join them. His son Charles added a note at the end, requesting that Howland inquire at the Insane Hospital in Augusta concerning the placement of a young man, William Henry, who suffered from seizures.

Mary Davis, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, to David and Anna Howland, 1845-11-25.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Davis was a prominent Quaker minister who expressed appreciation for the warm reception she enjoyed from the Howlands when she arrived; she mentioned Friends and the separation in Salem Quarterly.

Timothy Robinson, Windham, to David and Anna Howland, 1846-03-29.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Timothy Robinson was Anna's father. The letter contains family news and remarks about "Wilburism," with addendum from her brother Oliver Robinson

Charles Hill, North Berwick, to David and Anna Howland, 1846-06-23.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Charles was the son of William Hill. He reported about the New England Yearly Meeting and the Epistles that were read. He passed along John Wilbur's wish to be remembered to the Howlands.

John Wilbur, Hopkinton, to David and Anna Howland, 1846 7mo 19, 1847 3mo 6 .
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Two letters from John Wilbur (1774-1856) of Hopkinton, Rhode Island. He was a Quaker minister who objected to the evangelical focus promoted by John Joseph Gurney and other London Friends which led to a separation in New England Yearly Meeting in 1845. Wilbur acknowledged the Howlands' support for him and the new yearly meeting. The 1847 letter mentioned that Noah Winslow had written to him with an account of his disownment.

Samuel Buffington, Fall River, Massachusetts, to David Howland, 1846-09-22.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Business concerns and he also remarked on the Ohio Yearly Meeting which William Hills had attended. He mentioned the Gurneyite influence and Thomas B. Gould, John Wilbur. Swansea Meeting (Wilburite), Fall River, Massachusetts. (1806-1871)

William Hill, North Berwick, to David Howland, 1846 11mo 24, 1847 6mo 21.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

The letters focus on business concerns, then remarks on Quaker Wilburites and Gurneyites as reported in London and Philadelphia Friend. The second letter gave lengthy description of New England Yearly Meeting (Wilburite) which was well attended and approved an Epistle concerning the Separation to be printed.

William and Charles Hill to David Howland, 1847-09.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Two letters that discuss business and mention Quaker concerns

William Hill, North Berwick, to David Howland, 1847 9mo -12 mo.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

The correspondence concerned their investment to build a merchant vessel, Abeona. In letters of 9 month 1847, Hill expressed his desire to invest and in October assigned Howland to serve as his attorney

William Hill and Charles Hill to David Howland, 1848 1 mo. - 7 mo.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Most of the correspondence concerned their partnership in the barque Abeona. They hired Captain Read and negotiated with insurance company in New York. Also insurance claim regarding leather in Boston and damage to ship when it arrived in New York in September. Occasional family and remarks about Quaker meetings, especially the Separation in Ohio.

William Hill and Charles Hill to David Howland, 1848 8 mo -12 month.
Box 11
William Hill and David Howland correspondence , 1849.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Insurance claims and comments on the document prepared on the Separation in the New England Yearly Meeting; they maintained that the larger Gurneyite group had separated from the conservative members.

Thomas B. Gould, Newport, Rhode Island, to John L. Kite, Philadelphia, 1848-03-17.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Letter from a prominent Wilburite minister concerning James Sribbens with reference to J[ohn] Wilbur and Peter Davis. [Also includes print-out of the online transcript by Sharon Iwanick, 2003, from a copy of the letter in Narragansett Historical Society Register.]

Mary H. Howland from sister Anna and cousin Lois, 1848-04.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Mary was at school in North Berwick, a letter from home

Gulielma Brinton to son Joseph Brinton, 1849-08.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Family update from his mother including progress on the new house. Addendum by his sister Susanna

Oliver Robinson, Windham, to David and Anna Howland, 1852-05-08.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Letter to his sister and brother-in-law regarding dividends to be paid

William and E. Hill, North Berwick, to Anna Howland, 1852-12-07.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Condolences on the death of her husband, David P. Howland

Louise Campbell, Sangerville, Maine, to Mary H. Howland, 1857-1858.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Two letters from a friend with handwritten transcript, typed transcript, and transcript of a fragment of a third.

Poem written for Oak Grove Seminary by M. H. Howland, 1854-05.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Mansucript album from Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro, Maine.

Oak Grove Gleanings, 1854, 1856.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Vol. 1, number 20 and Vol. 14, number 1: "Gems of Thought we gather for mutual improvement." Mansucript journals of essays and poems by the Ladies of Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro, Maine.

Some lines to a friend by Rebecca H. Smiley, undated.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Manuscript poem written for Mary H. Howland with typed transcript

Research on Howland property in Vassalboro, Maine, 1764-1948.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Compiled by David Brinton. Includes a deed search, manuscript copy of Joseph Howland's indenture concerning the property, miscellaneous notes and newspaper clipping.

Some Copies of Auto-graphic Memoirs of My Dear Mother – Mary H. Howland Brinton, First wife of Joseph Brinton, 1864, 1864-1928.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Includes "Memoranda of my beloved wife, Mary H. Brinton." Mary H. Brinton died in 1870 shortly after the birth of her fifth child. The manuscript was sewed into acidic, water-stained corrugated cardboard covers, probably compiled by David Brinton, son of Mary and grandfather of the donor. Mary Howland taught school in the home of Jesse and Mary Ann Tucker in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. In Mary's memoir, she suffered her first hemorrhages in 1857 and was forced to give up teaching, but was able to attend New England Yearly Meeting in 1863 with Joseph and record the sessions. David Brinton's memoranda includes excerpts of letters to Mary's sister Anna. Sister Anna came to assist with care of Mary's first child, David, born 1864, and remained to help with the family. Mary, who had three additional children, was fragile and weak presumably from tuberculosis; she died days after the death of the fourth child, Mary. Removed from acidic cardboard covers.

Copies of the Last Word from Jesse R. Tucker of Dartmouth, Mass., 1937.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Copied into a fragment of David Brinton's journal. David was a schoolmate of Jesse R. Tucker, the son of Jesse Tucker, who died 1928. The memorial was included within cover of Joseph Brinton's Auto-graphic Memoirs, compiled by his son, David Brinton.

Elizabeth Bridwell manuscript, "Rufus Matthew Jones, Impenitent Optimist", 1962-1963.
Scope and Contents

Typed manuscript with two related letters from Willard Heiss. The note from donor explains that Elizabeth Bridwell, an Indiana Quaker, was a long-time friend of her parents, William and Louise Brinton, and they cared for her in their home in her late illness. She had worked as an assistant to James A. Michener. Rufus Jones was one of William Brinton's most admired professors at Haverford College.

Sample of books selected from Fisher-Brinton home library, 1814-1875.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Sample of treasured books selected by the donor. Margaret Collinson's noted that the Fishers and Brintons read extensively and together. Includes poetry and essays that were the property of Abraham Fisher and succeeding generations.

The Bee, property of Abraham Fisher, 1828

Choice Poems

Thoughts from Emerson

Christian Economy, 1814

French poetry, property of Abraham Fisher and Susanna Wright

Inspirational essays, carried by Abraham Fisher

Babes in the Basket, gift to Sarah from daughter Maria

The Young Cottager, gift of Maria to sister Eleanor, 1874

Children's Harp, gift to Eleanor circa 1875

Fruits of Solitude, William Penn, 1875

Greek Lexicon to the New Testament, property of Susanna Fisher

Sonnets of E. B. Browning, property of Susanna Fisher

Miniature volumes of Shakespeare

Fisher Greeting Cards, Irish Songbook, and Map.
Box 11
Scope and Contents

Various holiday cards- some signed, a 1934 map of Canada, a poem written on a 1955 Curtis Pension Committee Plan, and an (American-made) book of Irish songs.

Print, Suggest