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Learned collection on German-language theater

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Held at: University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts [Contact Us]3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6206

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in their reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

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German-Language Theater in Philadelphia: A Historical Sketch

In the period between 1830 and 1930, 5.9 million German immigrants arrived in the United States, comprising 15.7% of all immigrants arriving.[1] One might, further, speak of a "mid-nineteenth century character" of this German immigration: about one-third of German immigrants over those one hundred years arrived between 1850 and 1869, during which time German immigrants constituted fully 35% of the total number of immigrants arriving.[2] On the other hand, more German immigrants arrived in the 1880s––about 1.4 million––than during any other decade.[3] The highest peaks of annual German immigration during the period were reached in 1854 and 1882.[4]

German emigration to the United States famously began in Pennsylvania, with Francis Daniel Pastorius leading a group of German Mennonites and Quakers in the founding of Germantown, near Philadelphia, in 1683. The Middle Atlantic region in general, and particularly Pennsylvania, remained a favored destination of German settlement in the eighteenth century. In the nineteenth century, the focus of German settlement shifted westward and broadened significantly, with areas of settlement expanding into Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin, as well as Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas. There were also significant settlements in Louisiana, Texas, Colorado, California, and Washington.[5] But even with this shift, in 1880, Philadelphia, which was at that time the second largest city in the United States, had a German-born population of 55,769––considerably larger, in absolute terms, than the German-born populations of either Cincinnati or Milwaukee, and slightly larger than that of St. Louis. Only New York and Chicago had larger populations of German-born immigrants.[6] German-born Philadelphians made up 6.6% of the city's total population. Considering the German-born in combination with those who were the children of German immigrants, one can speak of Philadelphians of 'German stock' as amounting to 16.2% of the city's population in 1880. (Only the Irish made up a larger immigrant group in Philadelphia at that time.)[7]

Faced with the dilemmas of assimilation, German Americans in the second half of the nineteenth century debated the future of the 'German element' in American culture.[8] Love of the arts, especially music and theater, had long been a strong aspect of German social life, and so it was often through the expression of these cultural interests that German-American life distinguished itself. In the––perhaps filio-pietistic––formulation of the eminent German-American scholar Albert Bernhardt Faust: "The social influence of the German element in the United States consists in the emphasis laid upon the cultivation of those arts and habits which divert from the narrow path of selfish interest or material gain, and which elevate, ennoble, and increase the joy of living."[9] As was the case for other immigrant groups in the nineteenth century, and for American life in general, German-American life was much bound up with participation in voluntary associations, known in German as Vereine.[10] Philadelphia was by some measures in the forefront of German cultural expression in this regard. The first German-American singing society in the country, the Männerchor, was founded in Philadelphia on 15 December 1835. The Turngemeinde Philadelphia, formally organized on 15 May 1849, was the fourth in a succession of such Turnvereine, or gymnastic associations, that had begun to form in the United States in 1848.[11] Both types of Vereine were reminiscent of traditional communal life in Germany.

The support of German-language theater on a long-term basis was an often elusive goal for enterprising German-American community members in the mid to late nineteenth century. A German theater director and immigrant from Hamburg, Heinrich Börnstein, when undertaking to establish a German theater in St. Louis in 1858––what eventually opened the following fall as the St. Louis Opernhaus––tried to kindle enthusiasm for the new project among his compatriots by reminding them that, back in Germany, even a city with a population of only 12-15,000 inhabitants would usually have a theater of above-average quality, and that cities of 30-50,000 would, as a matter of course, boast a good, well-established theater presenting both operas and plays. Speculating that there were some 60,000 German-speaking residents of St. Louis, Börnstein asserted that one should be able to reckon at least 5%, or 3,000, of them as regular once-a-week theater-goers––and, if such were the case, then a good German theater was a realizable goal: "wir haben von Anfang an das feste Vertrauen gehabt, dass die deutsche Bevölkerung von St. Louis ihr eigenes deutsches Theater haben und erhalten könne, und in diesem Vertrauen haben wir gehandelt" (we were convinced from the beginning that the German population of St. Louis could have and maintain its own German theater, and we have acted in this conviction).[12]

By 1880, if not before, Philadelphia presumably had the critical mass of culturally engaged German speakers that Börnstein was talking about. Early efforts to provide some kind of ongoing German-language theatrical performances in Philadelphia were the work of Vereine who joined together to strive for this goal. German plays had been performed on American stages in English translation beginning as early as 1795, with a production of Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm in Charleston, South Carolina, and Schiller's Die Räuber, in New York, followed up by "a veritable flood of German plays descending upon the American stage" by the popular German playwright August von Kotzebue. But 1830 is the landmark year in which the first documented performances were given in the German language––in the Washington Theater on Old York Road, in Philadelphia, by a company of actors calling themselves the German Amateur Theatrical Society.[13]

A fairly continuous history of German-language performances in Philadelphia begins in 1840, with the formation of the Deutsche Unterhaltungsverein, which set as its mission the "Pflege der dramatischen Kunst" (the fostering of the dramatic arts), and gave several performances over the next year or two.[14] In May 1848, another amateur troop, under the direction of W. Herrmann and W. Deetz, gave performances that were evidently of good quality but poorly attended, judging by the lament in the pages of the Philadelphia newspaper Freie Presse, on 31 May. The writer conveys a sense of a strong German cultural life in Philadelphia in that era, while expressing disappointment that the degree of interest shown in the fledgling theater falls so far short of high-minded expectations brought from the German homeland:

Hier, wo das deutsche Leben mehr überwiegend als vielleicht in irgend einer Stadt vorherrscht, sollte man meinen, könnte nichts erwünschter kommen, als die schönen Abendunterhaltungen eines guten Theaters, das man in Deutschland in der kleinsten Provinzial-Stadt für eine gewisse Zeit im Jahre ganz bestimmt findet. Die Schauspieler spielen im allgemeinen gut und einige davon leisten wirklich Auszergewöhnliches. Wenn solch eine Gesellschaft vor leeren Bänken spielen muss, dann muss man an dem allgemeinen Sinn für gediegene Unterhaltung unter den Deutschen verzweifeln.

(Here, where German life predominates perhaps more than in any other city, one would think that nothing could be as desirable as the fine evening entertainment provided by a good theater, something that one finds without fail in even the smallest provincial city in Germany for a certain period in the year. The actors generally give a good performance, and a few of them can really be credited with extraordinary achievements. When a company like this has to play to empty seats, then one must begin to despair of the basic sense for quality entertainment among the Germans.)[15]

Around this time, various amateur theater associations (Liebhaber-Theater) performed sporadically, with greater or lesser success, at several venues in Philadelphia, including Franklin-Halle, on Sixth Street between Arch and Race, and the Arch Street Hall, near the Arch Street Theater (at Sixth Street). The lack of a suitable building was a hindrance. The repertoire sometimes left much to be desired, with the comedies of Kotzebue predominating at first.[16]

In C. F. Huch's account of German theater in Philadelphia, he views as welcome progress the opening in August 1855 of a "proper German theater with daily performances," under the competent direction of Wilhelm Böttner. That troop performed at first in the Melodeon, on Chestnut Street above Sixth, and later Böttner arranged to rent the City Museum, on Callowhill Street below Fifth, a church that had been renovated for use as a theater.[17] In the 1856-1857 season, Böttner and Bruno Berndt were joint directors, and in summer to fall 1857, Böttner and Serges. After Böttner left Philadelphia for New Orleans at the end of 1857, the German theater was reopened for another season in August 1858, under the joint direction of Meaubert and Josue. The City Museum was proving inadequate as a venue, and there was a plan at the beginning of 1859 to have a proper theater built, but the current performances were so unprofitable that the plan was dropped. Performances continued to be given in the same venue in 1859, under Josue's direction.[18]

Huch reports that plays performed in the years from 1855 to 1859 included the following authors and titles: Raimund (Der Verschwender; Der Alpenkönig), Nestroy (Till Eulenspiegel; Einen Jux will er sich machen; Der böse Geist Lumpazivavagabundus; Zu ebener Erde und erster Stock), Kleist (Käthchen von Heilbronn), Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer (Der Glöckner von Notre Dame; Hinko), Louis Schneider (Kean; Die eiserne Maske), August von Kotzebue (Der Wirrwarr; Menschenhass und Reue), Roderich Benedix (Die drei Junggesellen), Gustav Freytag (Die Journalisten), Friedrich Adami (Königin Margot und die Hugenotten), Pius Alexander Wolff (Preciosa), August Weirauch (Wenn Leute Geld haben), Carl Elmar (Unter der Erde), and Friedrich Kaiser (Stadt und Land). Every season's program included a number of plays from Schiller (Wilhelm Tell; Die Räuber; Maria Stuart; Kabale und Liebe; Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua), and one or more plays (in translation) from Shakespeare (Hamlet; Othello; Viel Lärm um Nichts). A total of 177 plays were performed in the years 1855 and 1856 together, and 121 in 1859 alone.[19]

In 1859, the 100th anniversary of Schiller's birth, on 10 November, was celebrated by offering performances of his plays Kabale und Liebe and Wilhelm Tell, on the 10th and the 11th. (The performance of plays by Schiller in November in honor of his birthday was a recurring custom in the German-language theater in Philadelphia throughout the coming decades.) Attendance was good for those performances but so poor for the rest of the year that the theater was closed down by the management in January 1860, only to re-open again some days later at the initiative of the actors. The actors valiantly carried on with performances but suffered under the same hindrances that German theater companies had battled for years: "lack of competent direction, of a well suited building, and of sufficient financial means to maintain the theater."[20]

In 1858 the Turngemeinde Philadelphia purchased a building on N. Third Street and then, in 1860, the adjacent property and, beginning in June of that year, theatrical performances alternating with concerts were offered in what was known as Turner-Halle, for two periods during the year, as a summer and a winter theater.[21]

With the battle of Fort Sumter in April 1861––the beginning of the American Civil War––the German theater entered another period of uncertainty. Actors were also among those who joined the military.[22] During the Civil War era, modest undertakings provided for performances at various venues, including Turner-Halle; Hermann-Halle, on Coates Street (later known as Fairmount Avenue) above Second Street; Vollmer and Born's Aktien-Bierhalle, on Third Street; and, in summer, Engel and Wolf's Farm. Notable success was achieved by Gustav Ostermann, the son-in-law of Wilhelm Böttner, who directed a theater troop in Hermann-Halle, from November 1862 to March 1863, under the name Odeon. After that, Ostermann joined his efforts with those of A. Scherzer, who had been leading a different troop at the Melodeon on Callowhill Street, and they continued productions at the latter venue through the summer.[23]

The Callowhill Street Theater opened in August 1863 under the direction of August W. Rabe and Nettelbladt, who decided not long afterwards that they lacked enough support to succeed. By the end of September, G. Töpfer and Th. Hanel had taken over the management and, under the name Stadttheater, performances continued to be given at that venue until spring 1864.[24] (The Callowhill Street Theater later burned down, in 1868, and Concordia-Halle, also a venue for theatrical performances and concerts, was built on the same site.)[25]

In April 1864, a German-language performance of Hamlet was given at the Academy of Music in honor of the three-hundredth anniversary of Shakespeare's birth. Opera companies from Germany also made periodic guest appearances at either the Academy of Music or at the Chestnut Street Theater in 1863 to 1865, 1867, and 1869.[26]

In fall 1864 previous venues for German theater were put to use again under new rubrics: the Volkstheater, co-directed by Serges and Reicher, operated in Hermann-Halle, from September to October; and the Vestvali-Lund-Theater, under the direction of Ivan C. Michels, opened in September at the former Stadttheater, or Melodeon (Callowhill Street), and continued to give performances through April 1865. With the close of that season, there was no stable venue offering German theater for some months.[27]

In 1866 German-language plays were offered in Klumpp's Turner-Halle and in Heinrich Hornung's Kensington-Halle (the latter located at the corner of Second Street and Germantown Avenue), but the productions were apparently of modest aim and middling quality.[28] Higher standards were met in guest performances at the Callowhill Street Theater by acting troops visiting from German theaters in New York, in 1866 and 1867. An open air theater opened in summer 1867 under the name Kensington-Volksgarten-Theater (at Third Street and Germantown Avenue), run by C. Klein and under the direction of J. Riedel.[29]

At the beginning of 1868, Hornung also took over management of Turner-Halle, and for a period of months presided over productions at the two venues, before deciding to consolidate his efforts in more challenging productions at Turner-Halle, where in August 1868 productions began with William Gerlach as superintendent, Martin Hagemann as director, and Theodor Schaumberg as music director.[30] (German-language performances continued to be offered in Turner-Halle under various rubrics throughout the 1870s.)

At this time, focused efforts were again made to develop a plan for securing a building as a permanent home for a German theater. A stock company with that aim had been chartered back in 1859, but for whatever reasons did not accomplish its goal. In 1867, at the meeting of an honorary committee related to the tenth annual Sängerfest (singing festival), a special committee was formed whose aim, again, was to found a stock company, for the purpose of financing not only the acquisition of a property for the theater but also the steady engagement of an acting troop and the ongoing costs.[31] Such a stock company was indeed incorporated, under the name "The German Theater of Philadelphia," on 18 March 1868, with Theodore A. Demmé as president and Charles Borm as treasurer. In 1870, the stock company purchased three houses on the northwest corner of Seventh Street and Vine. However, the financial arrangements did not go as planned, and the ultimate outcome was that after several years the houses had to be sold far below the purchase price, and the shareholders lost all of their investment.[32]

In the interim when the dealings of the stock company were still being worked out, attempts were made to establish a provisional German theater offering performances on a steady basis. From November 1869 to February 1870, a troop of actors performed at a location on the northeast corner of Franklin and Coates Street (the latter later known as Fairmount Avenue; the site, several years later, of Robert Tagg's Maennerchor Hall). The artistic director was Karl von Jendersky, the director (Regisseur) Heinrich Döbelin, and the music director Heinrich Greim. After financial failure, a new attempt, and then a fire, performances were moved to Concordia-Halle (the new building at the site of the former Callowhill Street Theater). During the summer of 1870, Scherzer undertook improvements to the stage in Concordia-Halle and, in the fall, opened the hall as the Philadelphia Stadt-Theater, with Eduard Härting directing plays and Theodor Schaumberg as Kapellmeister. Since that venue was also rented for balls, German-language plays were offered with some interruptions.[33]

After only occasional performances there in 1871, German-language plays were again performed in Concordia-Halle for significant stretches in 1872 to 1874, sometimes under the rubric of Stadt-Theater. Heinrich Maret directed productions there in February and in April 1872; in March he had moved his troop to a theater that he had rented on N. Seventh Street. In December 1872, the Stadt-Theater in Concordia-Halle opened under the general direction of Rudolf Beckier, with J.W. Jost as music director. The Stadt-Theater continued in the fall of 1873 with Moritz Hahn as both general director and director of plays (Regisseur), and Simon Hassler as music director. In the early months of 1874 there was a series of Sunday performances.[34]

From early 1871 until January 1874, German-language plays were also performed in Turner-Halle on a regular basis, under the directorship of Georg Brandt. The plays included: Wallensteins Lager and Wilhelm Tell, by Schiller; Othello, by Shakespeare; Nacht und Morgen, by Birch-Pfeiffer; Die Karlsschüler and Unser Prinz Friedrich, by Heinrich Laube; Inspektor Bräsig, by Theodor Gassmann and J. Krüger; Der Meineidbauer, by Ludwig Anzengruber; Die Schöppenstädter, by Rudolf Kneisel; Washington, der Befreier Nordamerikas, by Georg Schönfeldt; and Die Spitzenkönigin, by Hugo Müller and Adolph L'Arronge. After Brandt's departure, the Turngemeinde undertook its own productions of German-language plays in Turner-Halle, from April to August 1874, with L. Holfelder and Alexander Varena serving as directors, and F. Losse conducting the orchestra.[35]

In September 1874, the management of Turner-Halle was assumed by Henry Oberkirsch and Gottlob Hammer, with L. Holfelder continuing in the capacity of director and Theodor Schaumberg becoming music director once again (as he had been earlier). Oberkirsch and Hammer led the productions in Turner-Halle until 1877, when Holfelder and August Schmidt took over.[36]

The further path on which Hammer and Oberkirsch embarked proved to be a kind of watershed in the history of German-language theater in Philadelphia. In August 1877 they leased Ladner's Military Hall, at 528-532 N. Third Street (near the intersection with Spring Garden), and began to produce performances there under the name Germania Theater.[37] A theater newspaper, Die Bühne, containing the Germania's official program, began to appear on 19 April 1878.[38] Around April 1881, the hall underwent a major renovation and was rebuilt as a proper theater. It reopened in its new garb in September 1881.[39] At what became its permanent site, Germania Theater remained in existence for over 17 years, until early 1895.

Gottlob Hammer served as the first general director of the theater. Aside from his role in the theater, Hammer was a businessman dealing in Rhine wines. He was from Reutlingen, in the state of Württemberg, Germany, and had emigrated to the United States in 1865. His partner in the founding of Germania Theater, Henry Oberkirsch, served as the music director. Oberkirsch was also a music teacher and freelance conductor.[40] Heinrich Maret served as the first director of plays (Regisseur). Hammer and Oberkirsch jointly led the theater until spring 1882.

Germania Theater employed a resident troop of actors and actresses for each season, and there would also be a number of guest appearances by additional actors and actresses during the season. Performances were held nearly every day of the week. An advertisement that Hammer ran in the Philadelphia Tageblatt pithily conveyed the theater's raison d'être: "Jeden Abend deutsche Theater-Vorstellung von einem guten Künstler-Personal" (A German theatrical performance every evening, by a fine staff of artists).[41] As had been the custom earlier, Sunday performances were often billed under the rubric "Sacred Concert," in a nod to conservative or nativist sentiment that frowned upon the operation of the theater on the Christian Sabbath. However, in some years, laws passed in Philadelphia kept the theater closed on Sundays.[42]

Throughout the years of its existence Germania Theater continued to publish its own newspaper, as the official theater program. At first (as mentioned above) titled Die Bühne, it was called Germania Theater Zeitung for a number of years from 1882 on; after 1890 the masthead simply displayed the name of the theater.[43] The newspaper was usually a four-sided publication issued several times a week, carrying numerous advertisements of local businesses. In addition to the theater's program of plays, operas, and operettas, the paper included announcements about lectures, club meetings, balls, and festivals. In its first incarnation as Die Bühne, it also had a varied content beyond these basics, including news items (often theater-related news in the widest sense), anecdotes, jokes, and poems. Initially, in 1878, the paper was printed in batches of 3,000 copies, and it was handed out to patrons at performances, between acts.[44] According to a message in the first issue from the editors/publishers, Oberkirsch and Wolf, the paper was also mailed free of charge to subscribers. They aspired for it to be viewed as an "Unterhaltungsblatt" (entertainment publication) that readers would save for a while, rather than just toss aside––a cut above "gewöhnliche Anzeigezettel" (ordinary announcement flyers). Although the paper was otherwise in German, it carried, in the publisher's box, the English-language boast: "The best Advertising Medium in the City and Suburbs." Later on, in fall 1882, under the editorship of Adolph Stein, an English-language message with a different slant began to appear in the publisher's box: "Guaranteed circulation 30,000 copies per month."

After the tenure of Hammer and Oberkirsch, Alexander Kost took the helm of the theater. A comic actor who had previously performed in Chicago, Kost joined Germania's cast in 1878, and in the 1879-1880 season was responsible for directing farces and operettas (with another director responsible for dramas and comedies). In 1881 and early 1882, he was director at the newly opened Concordia Operetten-Theater, run by Robert Tagg. Kost directed Germania Theater from late 1882 until spring 1885, and then moved to Concordia-Halle, where he headed a troop under the name Thalia Theater, which seems to have been run on a model comparable to the Germania, for the season from fall 1885 to spring 1886.[45]

Meanwhile Alexander Wurster had taken over the directorship of Germania Theater in fall 1885, and he led the theater until spring 1891. Wurster had wide experience in German theater in the United States. He had previously directed the New Chicago Theater (in Chicago), which closed in 1878; and had also been active in St. Louis, directing Sunday performances for one season at the Olympic Theater, in 1876 to 1877; and for a regular season at the Apollo Theater in 1881 to 1882.[46] As the new director, Wurster addressed a message to the theater's "Freunde und Gönner" (friends and patrons) in the 24 October 1885 issue of Germania Theater Zeitung. While expressing his gratitude for what he optimistically characterizes as attendance increasing with each day ("den von Tag zu Tag sich steigernden Besuch"), he dubs his new post a 'difficult undertaking' ("schwierigen Unternehmen"), and is concerned to elicit continuing support. He introduces himself as a director with an artistic mission––"fortwährend bestrebt, dem geehrten kunstsinnigen Deutschthum dieser Stadt nur wirklich gediegene Vorstellungen zu bieten, kurz in dem Germania-Theater eine Bühne zu schaffen, würdig der deutschen Kunst und dem Deutschthum Philadelphia's zur Ehre und zum Vergnügen" (constantly striving to offer the venerable, art-loving German public of this city only sterling-quality performances, in short to create in Germania Theater a stage worthy of German art and of Philadelphia's German constituency, to its honor and for its amusement).[47]

That week the theater was offering performances every day from Monday through Saturday, with three plays featured: Die Anna-Lise, by Hermann Hersch, a drama (Schauspiel); and two comedies (Lustspiele), Die Anti-Xantippe, oder: Krieg der Frauen, by Rudolf Kneisel, and Das Stiftungsfest, by Gustav von Moser. The program is fairly representative: Die Anna-Lise was something of a perennial favorite; and Kneisel and Moser were two of the most consistently represented authors on the theater's program over the years.

Huch characterizes Wurster's tenure in glowing terms as "in künstlerischer Beziehung höchst erfolgreich" (highly successful in an artistic sense).[48] A souvenir program issued by Germania Theater in April 1890, commemorating five seasons, 1885-1890, under Wurster's management, records that a total of 1,000 performances were given, averaging about 200 performances of 69 different plays each year, during a theater season that ran from September to April. The repertoire during those years included a total of 257 plays by 108 different authors. The genres most represented were: Posse, Lustspiel, Schauspiel, Volksstück, and Schwank. Farces (Possen) and comedies (Lustspiele) typically accounted for nearly half of the repertoire. The authors with the greatest representation of works were Gustav von Moser (17 titles) and Wilhelm Mannstädt (16 titles). Other authors with considerable representation (from 8 to 13 titles) were: Eduard Jacobson, Rudolph Kneisel, Franz von Schönthan, Adolph L'Arronge, Heinrich Wilken, Leon Treptow, and Friedrich Schiller.[49]

Following Wurster's departure in 1891, the Germania had several directors in quick succession––Georg Heinemann, Adolf Binkert, and Jos. E. Metzger––and descended increasingly into financial difficulties and managerial disarray, until it finally closed around March 1895. The last extant theater newspaper, dated for the week beginning 28 February 1895, advertises performances for Tuesday 5 March through Saturday 9 March. For that week the featured plays were Hermann Sudermann's Die Ehre, and Schiller's Die Räuber.[50]

Despite the relatively long life of Germania Theater, and its embodiment of impressive energies and talent, as with all things that eventually pass away, it was vulnerable to being viewed in retrospect as having fallen short. Writing in 1926, the Lutheran pastor Georg von Bosse, who had emigrated to the United States from Germany in 1889, recalled the nineteenth-century history of German theater in Philadelphia as little more than a blank page strewn with ineffectual marks: "Das deutsche Theater ist wie in anderen Städten so auch in Philadelphia stets ein Schmerzenskind gewesen. Manche Anläufe zu einem ständigen deutschen Theater sind gemacht und keiner war erfolgreich" (As in other cities, German theater in Philadelphia has always been a child of misery. Some attempts at a permanent German theater have been made, but none was successful).[51]

By the time that Bosse was writing, yet another substantial enterprise had come and gone. Following the demise of Germania Theater, performances of German-language plays in Philadelphia were again held at various venues, such as Maennerchor Hall or the Arch Street Theater. The wish to have a more permanent venue once again resurfaced and money was raised to purchase a building at Franklin Street and Girard Avenue, which was then rebuilt, and opened in 1905 as the Deutsche Theater, or German Theatre, under the directorship of Max Hanisch, a German-speaking immigrant from St. Petersburg via Germany.[52] Ushered into life, as Bosse notes, with "schönen Hoffnungen" (fine hopes), that new German theater remained in existence for only about five or six years. In 1911 it was replaced by a Yiddish theater called the American; and after 1921 it was known as the Astor––a moving picture house.[53]

A Biographical Sketch of Theodor Bloch
(born Prussia, November 1832; died after 1900)

Most of the theater rehearsal materials contained in Series I of the Learned Collection comprise items that belonged to Theodor Bloch, a German immigrant who was active in German-language theater in Philadelphia from approximately the mid 1860s until at least 1895.[54] Bloch appears as an actor in the casts of some plays in the period from 1873 to 1879.[55] Later, he continued to be closely associated with the theater company of Germania Theater. Various souvenir programs of Germania Theater reflecting the theater seasons from fall 1885 to spring 1891 indicate that during this time Bloch served steadily as prompter (Souffleur) through four theater seasons: 1887-1888, 1888-1889, 1889-1890 and 1890-1891. On 28 April 1887, a special extra performance ("Große Extra-Vorstellung") of the play Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul, at Germania Theater, is advertised on a playbill as having been arranged by Bloch in celebration of his 25th anniversary in the theater ("arrangirt von Theodor Bloch zur Feier seiner 25jährigen Bühnenwirksamkeit"). Further insight about Bloch's contributions to the theater is provided by the souvenir program produced in commemoration of Germania Theater's seasons from fall 1885 to spring 1890. Bloch is credited as having compiled the cumulative information about the theater's repertoire contained in the program, and is said to have been keeping detailed records about the theater for 25 years.[56]

Many items in Series I, including published copies of plays that have been annotated as prompt books, as well as role books (actors' scripts), are labeled as the property of Theodor Bloch. Evidence from some of the files indicates that Bloch began systematically assembling theater rehearsal materials, and taking responsibility for them, with a view to later use, as early as 1873. By fall 1880 he had organized his collection of materials into a formal theater lending library, and began to advertise his operation in the theater newspaper of Germania Theater. Bloch's advertisement for his library appears regularly in the newspaper from that time on, and it appears in the last extant issue of the newspaper, in February 1895.[57] The Learned Collection contains a catalog for Bloch's library, dated by him 1886, which provides a detailed inventory and describes lending conditions.[58]

Bloch's home and business address was 442 N. Fourth Street, Philadelphia, more or less around the block from Germania Theater, at 528-532 N. Third Street. Aside from his involvement in the theater, Bloch was a businessman who ran a gold and silver refining business. Advertisements for his business––in which he seeks to purchase old gold and silver––can be found in the newspapers of Germania Theater from the first issue on.

Records about Theodor Bloch's household at 442 N. Fourth Street were found in the United States census of 1870, 1880, and 1900. His birthplace is given as Prussia. In the 1880 census the birthplace of both his mother and his father is said to be Prussia as well. The census of 1900 gives his date of birth as November 1832, and the year of his emigration as 1861. The passenger lists at Castle Garden show that a "Theo. Block," aged 29, arrived on the ship Bremen on 20 August 1861. (In the census of 1900, the last name is also spelled "Block.") His occupation is given as merchant, and his last place of residence Berlin. A date of death could not be found.

According to the census records, Bloch was married to Marie (or Mary) Bloch, who was born in September 1840 in Austria, and emigrated to the United States in 1855. She and Theodor married around 1865 (at the census of 1900, they had been married 35 years).

Based on the census records, it appears that Theodor and Marie Bloch did not have any children of their own but may have, in some capacity, raised and cared for Henry Frank and Matilda Frank, who both also participated in the German theater. In the census of 1870, two children, Henry and Matilda, aged 15 and 10, respectively, are listed as part of the Bloch household, with no other family name given. However, in the census of 1880, the two young people are listed as Henry Frank and Matilda Frank, aged 24 and 19, respectively, as part of a separate household headed by Henry Frank, at the same house number as Bloch, 442 N. Fourth Street. In that census an Emma Frank, aged 21, is also listed as part of the Frank household. Henry (or Heinrich) Frank appears in casts of plays beginning around 1873, and Mathilda ("Tilly") Frank beginning in 1878.[59] Henry Frank edited the newspaper of Germania Theater from 1885 to 1892, and was also an editor and publisher in a more general capacity in Philadelphia, with a branch office in Sea Isle City, N.J. He was the author of the book Das heutige Philadelphia, published in 1885.[60]

It is possible that Theodor Bloch made a trip back to Germany around or preceding the summer of 1873, and that he may have taken the opportunity then to acquire plays for use in the theater in Philadelphia. The summer of 1873 is a date of seeming significance in the context of the theater rehearsal materials of Series I. The earliest documentation of specific performances in Philadelphia is provided by some clippings of newspaper advertisements for performances of plays in Turner-Halle from 1873 to 1875. The earliest of such clippings, which are found pasted to the inside front covers of some published copies of plays, is dated 13 August 1873.[61] One might juxtapose this circumstance with some evidence from within the collection that Bloch may have traveled back to Germany after his original emigration. First, a playbill from the Residenz-Theater in Berlin, dated 2 June 1873, advertising a performance of Die alten Junggesellen, a German translation of the French play Les vieux garçons, by Victorien Sardou, was found pasted to the inside front cover of a published copy of Die Tage der Erkenntniss––a German version, by Forster, of the same play by Sardou––which was labeled on its cover as the property of Bloch (the title is also listed in the 1886 catalog of Bloch's theater lending library). It is possible that Bloch himself attended the performance of the play in Berlin and saved the playbill.[62] Second, the name Theodor Bloch is recorded on a form contained in a published copy of Arthur Müller's Die Hexe von Leonberg, documenting that Bloch paid a fee of 15 Thaler for purchase of the book, which is an edition sold especially for the stages, with the publication date 1870 (the form itself is not dated).[63] It is interesting that one finds an immigration record at Castle Garden in 1873 that fits Bloch's profile: a Theodor Bloch, merchant, aged 41, arrived on the ship Silesia on 10 July 1873, with his origin given as "USA," indicating that he was an immigrant already established in the United States.[64]

The circumstantial evidence suggesting that Bloch may have made a trip back to Germany around 1873 remains inconclusive. However, it can be said that, for whatever reason, his activities in producing and/or saving rehearsal materials for further use, as documented within the collection, appear to begin in earnest around August 1873.

After the closing of Germania Theater, around March 1895, there is no direct evidence of Bloch's possible continuing activities in connection with German-language theater. However, theater rehearsal materials from his lending library were evidently used to prepare performances of two plays at Harmonie Hall in December 1897.[65]

A Biographical Note on Marion Dexter Learned (1857-1917)

Marion Dexter Learned was born near Dover, Delaware, of parents of English and Welsh heritage. After graduating from Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, he served for four years as the chair of ancient and modern languages at Dickinson Seminary in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He went on to pursue graduate work in German at Johns Hopkins University, and in the course of his studies visited Germany for the first time in 1885, when he studied for several months at the University of Leipzig. He received a Ph.D. in German from Johns Hopkins in 1887, and subsequently taught there, eventually reaching the rank of associate professor of German. In 1895, Learned moved to the University of Pennsylvania, where he became professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and also served as the department's first chair. German-American cultural intersections were a major area of Learned's scholarly interest. His publications included, for example, The Pennsylvania German Dialect (1889), "Anfänge der deutschen Kultur in Amerika" (1893), The German American Turner Lyric (1897), and The Life of Francis Daniel Pastorius (1908). He gave academic addresses on such topics such as "German Influence in America" (Baltimore, 1892-1893), "German as a Culture Element in American Education" (Cincinnati, 1898) and "The Turner as Champions of American Liberty" (Allegheny, Pa., circa 1900). Learned was the founder, in 1897, of the monograph series Americana Germanica, and later, of the related German American Annals, both devoted to the comparative study of the historical, literary, linguistic, and other cultural relations of Germany and America. Among his many other accomplishments and honors, Learned was the organizer of the Association of Teachers of German in Pennsylvania; served as president of the National German-American Teachers Alliance (Nationaler Deutsch-Amerikanischer Lehrerbund), from 1899 to 1901; and helped to found the German-American Historical Society, in 1901.

It is not known whether Professor Learned was personally acquainted with Theodor Bloch, or exactly how he came to acquire the items that today comprise the Learned Collection on German-Language Theater. It is interesting to note that Learned arrived in Philadelphia at just around the time that Germania Theater finally closed. Given Learned's scholarly interests, it seems likely that he would have had personal contact with some members of the German theater milieu in Philadelphia.

Endnotes (Biography/History)

[1] Frederick C. Luebke, "Patterns of German Settlement in the U.S. and Brazil," in Germans in the New World. Essays in the History of Immigration (Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1990), by Luebke, 95, Table 1. Luebke's data are derived from: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Historical Statistics of the United States, Colonial Times to 1970 (Washington, DC, 1975), 106. These statistics do not include German-speaking immigrants from nations other than Germany.

[2] John A. Hawgood, The Tragedy of German-America. The Germans in the United States of America during the Nineteenth Century––and After (New York: Putnam's, 1940), 58.

[3] Luebke, 95, Table 1. In the 1880s, Germans constituted 27.5% of total immigration.

[4] The peaks were 215,009 and 250,630, respectively. U. S. Bureau of the Census, Historical Statistics, 106.

[5] Günter Moltmann, "The Pattern of German Emigration to the United States in the Nineteenth Century," in America and the Germans. An Assessment of a Three-Hundred-Year History, ed. Frank Trommler and Joseph McVeigh (Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1985), 21.

[6] In 1880, the German-born populations of Cincinnati and Milwaukee numbered 46,157 and 31,483; that of St. Louis, 54,901; and those of New York and Chicago, 163,482 and 75,205, respectively. (The figure for New York does not include Brooklyn, which at that time had not yet been incorporated into Greater New York and, as the third largest American city, had a German-born population comparable to that of Philadelphia, at 55,339.) U.S. Census Office, Tenth Census of the United States, June 1, 1880, Volume 1: Statistics of the Population at the Tenth Census (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1883), 538-539.

[7] Immigrants of Irish stock made up 27% of the city's population. Russell A. Kazal, "Becoming 'Old Stock': The Waning of German-American Identity in Philadelphia, 1900-1930" (Ph. D. dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 1998), 99, Table 1.1. Kazal's source for the table is, in turn: Theodore Hershberg, Alan N. Burstein, Eugene P. Ericksen, Stephanie W. Greenberg and William L. Yancey, "A Tale of Three Cities: Blacks, Immigrants, and Opportunity in Philadelphia, 1850-1880, 1930, 1970," in Philadelphia. Work, Space, Family, and Group Experience in the Nineteenth Century, ed. Theodore Hershberg (New York: Oxford UP, 1981), 465, Table 1. Kazal published an abridged version of his dissertation as: Becoming Old Stock: The Paradox of German-American Identity (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2004).

[8] Kathleen Neils Conzen, "German-Americans and the Invention of Ethnicity," in America and the Germans, 133-135. Conzen argues that by "reacting to the assimilation norms held out to them by American society" and striving for a sense of group cohesiveness, German Americans "helped also to invent ethnicity itself as a category within American society" (133).

[9] Albert Bernhardt Faust, The German Element in the United States (New York: Arno Press and the New York Times, 1969; reprint of the revised edition published by the Steuben Society, 1927), Volume 2, 250-251.

[10] Kazal, 60-61.

[11] Lesley Ann Kawaguchi, The Making of Philadelphia's German-America: Ethnic Group and Community Development, 1830-1883 (Ph. D. dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 1983), 270, 277. The very first Turnverein was founded in Cincinnati.

[12] Anzeiger des Westens, August 28, 1858. Qtd. in Alfred Henry Nolle, The German Drama on the St. Louis Stage (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1917; Americana Germanica No. 32), 26-27. Börnstein was at that time the editor of the Anzeiger, a St. Louis newspaper. All translations from the German are my own.

[13] Hermann E. Rothfuss, "The Beginnings of the German-American Stage," German Quarterly 24.2 (March 1951): 94.

[14] C. F. Huch, "Das deutsche Theater in Philadelphia vor dem Bürgerkriege," Mitteilungen des Deutschen Pionier-Vereins von Philadelphia 6 (1907): 13-27; here: 13. The article was the first in a three-part series by Huch in Mitteilungen, followed by: "Das deutsche Theater in Philadelphia während des Bürgerkrieges," 7 (1908): 10-20; and "Das deutsche Theater in Philadelphia seit dem Bürgerkriege," 8 (1908): 14-29. My narrative from this point will closely follow Huch, with citations using the author's last name and the abbreviated titles: "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," "Während des Bürgerkrieges," and "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," respectively.

[15] Qtd. in Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege." 13-14.

[16] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 15-18.

[17] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 19. On the two venues, see Irvin R. Glazer, Philadelphia Theatres, A-Z. A Comprehensive, Descriptive Record of 813 Theatres Constructed Since 1724 (New York: Greenwood Press, 1986): the Melodeon, 167; and City Museum, 86-87.

[18] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 19-22.

[19] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 19-23. Huch does not specify the total number of plays for 1858. The works listed are just a sampling from those named by Huch as performed more than twice, or as noteworthy productions. In many cases, Huch gives only the titles.

[20] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 23.

[21] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 24. Huch identifies the building originally bought by the Turngemeinde as "Marshalls-Institut." According to playbills and clippings of newspaper advertisements for Turner-Halle held in the Learned Collection (dated 1873-1881), the address was 444 & 446 N. Third Street. (See, for instance, playbills 1875-1879, folder 688.)

[22] Huch, "Vor dem Bürgerkriege," 24.

[23] Huch, "Während des Bürgerkrieges," 13-15. One notes in Huch's account that the Melodeon––previously mentioned as a venue on Chestnut above Sixth––at this point is being used as a name for a venue on Callowhill Street; see note 25, below.

[24] Huch, "Während des Bürgerkrieges," 15.

[25] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 22. The "Callowhill-Straszen-Theater" to which Huch makes repeated reference is apparently a rubric for performances being held at the site originally called the City Museum, located (as mentioned above) on Callowhill Street 'below Fifth.' The address of the successor venue, Concordia-Halle, was 417-427 Callowhill Street (see playbill of 1874, folder 676); that is also the address given for Concordia Operetten-Theater, which opened there in 1881 (see librettos, box 33). Glazer's account of City Museum confirms this assumption: "When [the site] reopened after the 1868 fire, it offered plays, vaudeville and German Drama. Its new name was the Concordia" (86-87). One of the alternate names that Glazer gives for the site is "Melodeon"; his compendium makes no reference to the name "Callowhill Street Theater."

[26] Huch, "Während des Bürgerkrieges," 16-17; "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 15.

[27] Huch, "Während des Bürgerkrieges," 18-19; "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 14.
[28] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 14.

[29] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 16.

[30] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 16. Musical scores authored by Theodor Schaumberg can be found in the Learned Collection––folders 655 (for the play Bruder Liederlich) and 662-664 (for Die Afrikanerin)––as well as handwritten role books (actors' scripts) and handwritten transcriptions of plays that are stamped with his name. In the latter category is a handwritten copy of Roderich Benedix's one-act comedy Nein, signed and dated by Schaumberg 21 February 1868 (folder 44).

[31] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 18-19.

[32] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 20-21.

[33] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 21-23.

[34] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 24-25.

[35] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 25-26. Concerning German-language theater in Turner Halle during this period, a number of performances are documented by newspaper clippings in the Learned Collection (with titles in addition to the ones named by Huch); see Appendix 2: List of Newspaper Advertisements for Performances in Turner-Halle, 1873-1875, following the last series of the collection inventory of this register.

[36] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 27. Concerning the history of the German theater from 1877 on, Huch gives only a brief overview, while referring the reader to an article ("eine Geschichte der hiesigen deutschen Bühne") published on 2 July 1905 in the Philadelphia newspaper Die Neue Welt, by Siegfried Remak, who served for many years as the ticket agent of Germania Theater. I was unfortunately unable to consult that article before completing the writing of this register. My narrative about Germania Theater is based to a great extent on the holdings of the Learned Collection.

[37] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 27. See also the entry for "Germania Theatre," in Glazer, 125. Huch does not give a street address for the site. Glazer gives the street number as "520-530." Playbills and theater newspapers held in the Learned Collection all give the address as 528-532 N. Third Street. Earlier items, in 1878 to 1880, also describe the building as "früher Ladner's Military Hall." (See, for instance, theater newspapers for 1878, folder 690.)

[38] See folder 690 for the newspaper's first issue.

[39] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 27. Huch states the theater closed for reconstruction in "April 1880." Extant issues of theater newspapers suggest the closing was likely in April 1881.

[40] The details about Gottlob Hammer's origins and emigration can be gleaned from a biographical sketch of his son, also named Gottlob Hammer, found in Hervorragende und fortschrittliche Deutsch-Amerikaner von Philadelphia Pennsylvania und Umgegend (Philadelphia: German Daily Gazette Publishing Co., 1906; unpaginated). The professional activities of Oberkirsch are reflected in the advertisements that he ran in the Germania's newspaper, Die Bühne, beginning with the first issue. The paper also carries advertisements for Hammer's wine business. (See folder 690.)

[41] 18 December 1877.

[42] The theater was forced to close on Sundays during the season 1887-1888 for the first time in 15 years ("seit 15 Jahren das erste Mal"), according to a souvenir program for that season. In the souvenir program for the season 1890-1891, it is again noted that the theater had remained closed on Sundays, and that this had been the case for four years ("wie bereits seit 4 Jahren"), that is, throughout the intervening period. The souvenir programs are held at the German Society of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, call numbers AG 720.2 and AG 720.4, respectively.

[43] For an overview of the Learned Collection's holdings of the newspapers of Germania Theater, see the Index to Theater Newspapers in the indices at the end of this register.

[44] Stated in an advertisement for the theater in Philadelphia Tageblatt, 30 April 1878.

[45] The Thalia Theater also issued its own newspaper carrying the program (folder 711).

[46] Nolle, 53, 56. See also a small news item about Wurster and the closing of the Chicago theater in the Germania's newspaper, 19 April 1878, under "Theater-Neuigkeiten" (folder 690).

[47] See folder 704.

[48] Huch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 27. In 1893 to 1896, Wurster led another German theater in St. Louis, which, despite his evident talent as a director, faltered financially; Nolle, 65.

[49] Germania Theater, souvenir program, 1885-1890, held at the German Society of Pennsylvania, call number AG 720.3.

[50] Hoch, "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 27. For the theater newspaper, see folder 710. Hoch states that the theater closed on the 1 February 1895––evidently the closing was later than that. Rehearsal materials for Die Ehre bear names of cast members as advertised in the newspaper (see folders 573-578). The performances of that play were scheduled for 5 and 6 March.

[51] Georg von Bosse, Philadelphia und sein Deutschtum. Ein Gedenkblatt von Ausstellungsjahr 1926 (Philadelphia: Graf & Breuninger, 1926), 130. Bosse initially settled in Egg Harbor City, N.J. After several moves, he arrived in Philadelphia in 1905.

[52] The holdings at the German Society of Pennsylvania related to the Deutsche Theater at Franklin Street and Girard Avenue include a commemorative booklet issued in March 1909, in honor of Hanisch's 25th anniversary in his career as an actor (call number AG 715.4), and a collection of theater programs.

[53] Bosse, 130. Glazer, entry on the German Theatre, 125; and on the Astor Theatre, 62.

[54] Huch notes Bloch's name among the members of a theater troop in summer 1866; "Seit dem Bürgerkriege," 15. Huch speculates that Bloch was a prompter at that time.

[55] See, for instance, the cast listing in a clipping of a newspaper advertisement for a performance of Carl Elmar's Ein jüdischer Dienstbote in August 1873, pasted to inside front cover of the published copy (folder 100); and a playbill for a performance of Arthur Müller's Die Hexe von Leonberg in September 1879 (folder 678).

[56] The compiler is given as: "Theodor Bloch, der sich seit 25 Jahren mit der Statistik des hiesigen Deutschen Theaters eingehend beschäftigt"; Germania Theater, souvenir program, 1885-1890, held at the German Society of Pennsylvania, call number AG 720.3. Three other souvenir programs held at the German Society are for seasons 1886-1887, 1887-1888, and 1890-1891 (call numbers AG 720.1, AG 720.2, and AG 720.4, respectively). Bloch is also credited as the compiler of the 1890-1891 program. For the playbill of 1887, see Learned Collection, folder 683. On Bloch as prompter, see also an item of uncertain date that appears to be a draft of a speech about the prompter Bloch, apparently recited by one of the actors before or after a performance (miscellaneous unidentified items, folder 629).

[57] The advertisement, which retains a similar form over the years, recommends the theater lending library (Theater-Leihbibliothek) to theater directors, amateur theaters, and associations (Vereinen), boasting an extensive selection of "Possen, Schau- und Lustspielen mit den dazu gehörigen Rollen, unter den billigsten Bedingungen" (farces, dramas and comedies, with accompanying role books, under the cheapest terms). See the first advertisements, in folder 692, and the last in folder 710.

[58] See Series III, box 34.

[59] Cast lists usually only give "Herr Frank" and "Fräulein Frank"; their full names appear when benefit performances are dedicated to them––for Heinrich Frank in July 1878 (newspaper, folder 690) and for Mathilde, or Tilly, Frank in January and June 1879 (playbills, folder 678).

[60] An advertisement for the book is found in the newspaper for Thalia Theater, which was also edited by Frank; see the issue for the week ending 6 March 1886, folder 711.

[61] See Appendix 2: List of Newspaper Advertisements for Performances in Turner Halle, 1873-1875, following the last series of the collection inventory in this register.

[62] For the playbill, which has been restored, see folder 722. It is missing one fragment, which remains pasted to the inside front cover of Bloch's copy of Die Tage der Erkenntnis. The book was among the ones separated from the manuscript collection for cataloging in Rare Books.

[63] See folder 347. The materials in the file were evidently used for a performance in Philadelphia in July 1875 (documented by a playbill, folder 688).

[64] In the summary data accessible in the online database at www.castlegarden.org (as accessed 9 June 2007), the first name Theodor is (mis)spelled as "Thodor."

[65] See the files for Hugo Müller's Im Wartesalon erster Klasse (folders 370-371), and Feodor Wehl's Ein modernes Verhängniss (folders 595-596); and the theater newspaper of Harmonie Hall advertising the performances (folder 699).

The Learned Collection on German-Language Theater comprises material relating to the production and performance of German-language plays in Philadelphia, primarily in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. The collection might be thought of in terms of two broad categories: materials directly used by theater companies for rehearsal and performance of works; and printed materials designed for the benefit of audiences and to promote performances.

The core of the materials in the first category are to be found in Series I, Theater Rehearsal Materials, including the following types of items: published copies of plays (or, occasionally, handwritten transcriptions) that have been annotated as prompt books; handwritten scenarios; handwritten role books (actors' scripts); and, in scattered instances, props (limited to written items––letters, written orders, statements––that were called for in the script). The materials of Series I date from approximately 1832 to 1897. They represent a total of 168 titles of German plays by 100 authors (including three authors who appear only as co-authors; one work was published anonymously). In some cases the collection includes musical scores associated with that work (Series IV). The extant musical scores are usually handwritten; in a few instances, a published booklet of music is included. Eleven composers are represented (and one unidentified composer), including two composers (Theodor Schaumberg and C. Harry Lauer) who were active in the local Philadelphia milieu as music directors.

The majority of the materials in Series I are associated with performances in Philadelphia from around 1873 to 1895, predominantly (although not exclusively) at Germania Theater, at 528-532 N. Third Street, which operated from August 1877 until around March 1895.[1] By far most of the items comprise the surviving inventory of the theater lending library of Theodor Bloch, a German immigrant to Philadelphia who was active in German-language theater in the city during this period.[2] The use of the materials for performances can usually be inferred from the evidence of annotations. In some cases the materials can be correlated to specific performances that are documented by playbills and theater newspapers in the collection. In other cases, the time period when they were most likely used has been inferred through consideration of the cast(s) reflected in annotations (the names of cast members are often written on the role books and/or noted on the page listing characters in the published copy). In a few instances, contemporary participants in German-language theater actually signed and dated materials that they produced or used.[3] Performances were generally able to be confirmed only from the 1870s on. However, it is possible that in some cases handwritten items originated even earlier, and original cast-member names are either no longer in evidence or could not be dated.[4]

The majority of the titles found in Series I are by authors who were popular on nineteenth-century German stages but whose works today are mostly forgotten, or who would primarily be studied under the rubric of 'popular' or 'commercial' theater. The five authors represented by the most titles are Gustav von Moser, Emil Pohl, Hermann Salingré, Louis Schneider, and Friedrich Kaiser (each with between 7 and 9 titles). Rudolf Kneisel, Arthur Müller, Julius Rosen, and Feodor Wehl are represented by four titles each. Five women authors are included: Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer; Hedwig Dohm; Amalie, Princess of Saxony; Therese von Megerle; and Betty Young. (Only Birch-Pfeiffer is represented by more than one title.) The collection contains materials for some titles that are so obscure today that copies of the text are difficult to find, and in a few instances the title (whether it is represented by a published copy of the play, a handwritten transcription, or perhaps only role books) might be unique in the realm of cataloged items.

A significant number of the titles are translations and/or adaptations from works in other languages, especially French, but a few in other languages. In the German-American context, Megerles's Onkel Tom, based on Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, is perhaps worthy of mention; playbills and a theater newspaper are included. In the context of a selection of authors in which there are only a handful with a claim to any kind of canonical status––Johann Nestroy, with Einen Jux will er sich machen, or Hermann Suderman, with Die Ehre––it is fascinating to find Friedrich Schiller represented here only as an adapter, with his fairy-tale drama Turandot, Prinzessin von China, based on the Italian play Turandot, by Carlo Gozzi. (As can be seen by a glance at the indices to the collection's playbills and theater newspapers, found at the end of this register, Schiller's standard and well-loved works, including Wilhelm Tell, Die Räuber, and Maria Stuart, were also produced regularly on the German-language stage in Philadelphia, although they are not represented in Series I.)

In the cataloging of these titles, the adapters have been regarded as the primary author, and every effort was made to trace both the author and the title of the original source (the complete information could not always be found). In two instances, the title constitutes an unattributed German translation of a French work, and since the translator could not be identified, the work has been placed under the name of the author of the French source (Bernard-Valville; Michel Carré). One work has been cataloged according to its title because the author could not be identified (Die lebendig todten Eheleute).

A significant aspect of the selection of plays represented in Series I is that 50 of the 168 titles are works designed to be performed with music. (Musical scores––not necessarily complete––are included for only 20 works.)

Considered by genre, the selection of works is weighted toward comic genres, with over one hundred works designated as Lustspiel (comedy), Posse (farce), Schwank (comical story), or Komödie (or: Comödie; comedy). Following is an overview of the distribution of titles according to genre:

50 Lustspiel

34 Posse

17 Schwank

14 Schauspiel

11 Volksstück or Volks-Schauspiel

7 Drama

4 Lebensbild

4 Liederspiel

3 Trauerspiel

2 Märchen

5 Charakterbild (Characterbild)

4 Genrebild

3 Oper / Operette

2 Dramatisches Gedicht

8 Miscellaneous genre designations (dramatisches Gemälde; Melodrama; Scene; dramatisches Spiel; Scherzspiel; Weihnachts-Komödie; Zeitgemälde; dramatische Anecdote)

While most of the theater rehearsal materials appear to come from Theodor Bloch's lending library, it is interesting to note that the extant items apparently represent only a fraction of the original library. The collection includes a catalog that Bloch compiled for his library in 1886 (the lone item constituting Series III). The catalog contains a 39-page long, mostly single-spaced, handwritten list of titles that Bloch held at that time––perhaps 1,000 titles or more.

One needs to consider that some published books (all containing one or more plays) have been separated from the Manuscript Collection in order to be cataloged as Rare Books. In all cases, the books in this category contained no significant annotations and were not associated with any theater rehearsal materials. The books that have been separated in this way during the present processing (others may have been separated from the collection at an earlier point) number approximately 75. Nearly half of those books are accounted for by a partial set of the collected plays of August von Kotzebue––34 of the 50 volumes contained in: Theater (Wien: Lechner, 1830-1833). A quick perusal indicates that the titles represented by these books are indeed listed in Bloch's catalog, although the catalog does not list every single title in the volumes that contain multiple plays. In addition, a number of the books are labeled as the property of Bloch. It seems a reasonable assumption that most, if not all, of the books belonged to him. With that in mind, it appears that Bloch may have listed many titles in his catalog even if he owned only a published copy of the play. Even if role books may have existed for these additional titles, the lack of annotations in the published copies suggests that the materials were never actually used to prepare a performance. Overall then, one might speculate that the extant items in Series I are more representative than it might at first appear. If they seem to represent perhaps only 15% of the original library, they might nevertheless represent a higher proportion of the items in the library that were actually connected with a performance in Bloch's milieu.

The materials of the second category mentioned at the outset of this discussion––namely, items designed for the benefit of audiences and to promote performances––include: librettos (Series II), playbills (Series V), oversized (poster-format) playbills (Series VII.C), and theater newspapers (Series VI), as well as a handful of newspaper clippings of advertisements for performances, from the general German-language press of Philadelphia.[5] The materials in this category are mostly concentrated in the period 1878 to 1894, with scattered items dating to as early as 1873 and to as late as 1898. Almost all of these materials pertain specifically to Philadelphia, although a few items relate to performances in other cities in the United States (New York City; Newark, N.J.; Sea Isle City, N.J.; and Kansas City, Mo.); and one playbill is from Berlin, Germany. The few items that pertain to performances in cities other than Philadelphia all appear to have had some relationship to individuals who participated in German-language theater in Philadelphia. (For instance, a theater newspaper from Newark records performances by cast members who routinely performed in Philadelphia during the period; a playbill from New York City records a performance that was evidently prepared using items borrowed from Bloch's library; and the single playbill from Germany was possibly saved by Bloch during a visit to Germany––he, at any rate, pasted it to the inside front cover of the published copy of the play held in his library.)

The theater rehearsal materials of Series I include a small subset of materials––17 files––that deserve special mention, since they seem to share certain qualities that set them apart in the context of the collection on the whole.[6] First, the works in question are, on the whole, significantly older, representing, in effect, an earlier generation of authors in comparison to the mid-to-late nineteenth century authors who predominate in the collection. The materials themselves are all written on a heavier-weight and higher quality paper that has an unusual look in comparison to most other handwritten items in the collection, and the style of German handwriting (Kurrentschrift) also tends to a more intricate look typical of older samples. These items appear to have been produced before 1870. The files consist entirely of handwritten items, without the inclusion of a published copy of the play as a prompt book, as is more commonly the case among the materials that can be directly related to Theodor Bloch's lending library. The items in any given file form a uniform set, seemingly written out in the same hand. Some of the files might be linked based on the handwriting. In some cases the items are accompanied by a paper sleeve, and sometimes the sleeve is secured with a red wax seal. Among the several files that include a seal with a discernible impression, four share a seal with an identical design, while a fifth file has a seal that seems to bear a coat of arms. It seems unlikely that the materials in these 17 files originated in the German-American theater milieu; rather, they may have been produced in a German-speaking milieu in Europe, perhaps on a noble estate where private performances were given. It should be noted that two of these titles are listed in Theodor Bloch's catalog: Karl Töpfer, Nehmt ein Exempel dran; and Oswald, Die Theaterprobe. On that basis, one might speculate that Bloch acquired the items fortuitously from a source outside of his usual milieu. There is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. None of the items is marked by Bloch in any way, and the annotations on the items do not include any references that were able to be identified as linking them to the German theater milieu of Philadelphia.

Appendices and Indices

Following the last series in the collection inventory is a series of appendices and indices that gather together information about various materials in the collection.

Appendices 1 to 3, mentioned in the notes to the discussion above, give overviews, respectively, of the theater venues represented; of the handful of scattered newspaper clippings that document additional performances; and of a certain grouping of theater rehearsal materials judged to be possibly older and of a provenance different from the late-nineteenth-century German-American milieus generally represented in the collection.

The three indices that follow the appendices convey detailed information about the performances represented in the playbills and theater newspapers contained in the collection. The Index to Playbills and the Index to Theater Newspapers, organized according to theater name, and then chronologically, constitute a supplement to the general inventory list for Series V and VI; they provide an itemized listing of all the playbills and theater newspaper issues, respectively. Finally, the Author/Title Index to Playbills and Theater Newspapers has been compiled in order to enable the location of materials within the collection of playbills and theater newspapers related to specific authors and works of interest. This index also includes a separate section for composers known to have been responsible for the music accompanying plays represented in the collection (as advertised in the playbills and theater newspapers).

Endnotes (Scope and Contents)

[1] For an overview of the theaters represented in the collection, see Appendix 1: List of Theater Venues Represented in the Learned Collection, in the appendices following the last series in the collection inventory.

[2] See the "Biographical Sketch of Theodor Bloch," in the Biography/History note, above.

[3] Additional confirmation of specific performances could well be drawn from the general German-language press of the period. Theater advertisements were carried, for instance, in the Philadelphia Tageblatt, the Philadelphia Demokrat, Die Freie Presse, and Die Neue Welt. A scholarly work useful in this regard is the Ph.D. thesis of Orlando Faulkland Lewis, "Performances of German Drama in Philadelphia 1842-1898, as advertised in 'Philadelphia Demokrat'; 2,966 titles, 19,270 performances" (handwritten manuscript, University of Pennsylvania, 1900).

[4] Huch's series of articles on German theater in Philadelphia, cited above (in the "Historical Sketch on German-Language Theater in Philadelphia," in the Biography/History note) gives listings of actors and actresses from as early as the 1850s.

[5] There is no separate series for clippings. These clippings are almost exclusively found pasted to the inside covers of published copies of plays that belonged to Theodor Bloch's theater lending library, and so are found randomly throughout Series I. They document performances given in Turner Halle, Philadelphia, just prior to the period covered by the collection's playbills and theater newspapers. For an overview, see Appendix 2: List of Newspaper Advertisements for Performances in Turner Halle, 1873-1875, in the appendices following the last series in the collection inventory. A single stand-alone newspaper clipping from Philadelphia Tageblatt, dated 8 November 1878, has been integrated with the theater newspapers (Series VI).

[6] For a list of these files, see Appendix 3: List of Theater Rehearsal Materials of an Unknown Milieu, in the appendices following the last series in the collection inventory.

Gift of Marion Dexter Learned, 1917 [?]

For a complete list of the 168 plays and 10 librettos found in the collection, do the following title search in Franklin: Learned Collection on German-Language Theater.

Publisher
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Finding Aid Author
Violet Lutz
Finding Aid Date
2007
Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Collection Inventory

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Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by author, then by title of work.

Series Description

This series comprises materials used by theater companies in preparing performances of plays. Many of these materials are marked in some way as belonging to Theodor Bloch, who ran a theater lending library in Philadelphia. The materials generally fall into several major categories that have been ordered in the following sequence:

1. Published edition (printed copy) of the play, usually bearing handwritten annotations, for use as a prompt book. In some cases the file contains, instead, a handwritten copy of the complete text.
2. Handwritten scenario
3. List of props. Notes about props are often found on the scenario, or somewhere in the copy of the text, but occasionally there is a separate list.
4. Props. Some files contain fictional handwritten 'letters,' or other handwritten documents, that are called for in the script, to be held or read by a character at a certain point in the action.
5. Role books (actors' scripts). Handwritten booklets containing an individual role, with cues.

Occasionally, handwritten notes that seem to be about the props, stage set, or costumes are to be found on the outside or inside covers of role books. In many cases the names of actors or actresses who played the role are noted on the front of role books (sometimes several different casts over time can be discerned; in other cases earlier names have been erased).

Materials for two unidentified plays are found at the end of Series I (folders 625-628); and three miscellaneous unidentified items (folder 629): a draft of a rhymed speech about the prompter Theodor Bloch; a poem or rhymed speech referring to a story of infanticide; and song lyrics, including the line "Mein Schatz is a Jäger."

Oversized role books and scenarios are found in series VII.A.

Individual cataloging records for the files of each title (author as main entry) have been entered into Worldcat; these records can also be accessed through Franklin, the online catalog of the University of Pennsylvania (http://www.franklin.library.upenn.edu).

Physical Description

32 boxes

Adami -- Anzengruber.
Box 1 Folder 1-17
Bahn -- Belly.
Box 2 Folder 18-36
Benedix -- Bernard-Valville.
Box 3 Folder 37-54
Birch-Pfeiffer -- Blum.
Box 4 Folder 55-73
Blumenthal -- Contessa.
Box 5 Folder 74-90
Deinhardstein -- Feldmann.
Box 6 Folder 91-108
Friedrich -- Görner (Aschenbrödel).
Box 7 Folder 109-129
Görner (In Pyrmont) -- Hahn.
Box 8 Folder 130-153
Halm -- Homburg.
Box 9 Folder 154-172
Hopf -- Jacobson.
Box 10 Folder 173-192
Jahn -- Kaiser (Etwas Kleines).
Box 11 Folder 193-217
Kaiser (Jagd-Abenteuer) -- Karl.
Box 12 Folder 218-234
Kneisel.
Box 13 Folder 235-252
Kotzebue -- L'Arronge (Doctor Klaus).
Box 14 Folder 253-262
L'Arronge (Mein Leopold) -- Lindau.
Box 15 Folder 263-281
Lortzing -- Mallachow and Elsner.
Box 16 Folder 282-294
Megerle -- Moser (Der Bibliothekar).
Box 17 Folder 295-316
Moser (Eine Frau, die in Paris war) -- Moser and Drost.
Box 18 Folder 317-338
Moser and L'Arronge -- Müller, A. (Die Hexe von Leonberg).
Box 19 Folder 339-354
Müller, A. (Johannisfeuer) -- Müller von Königswinter.
Box 20 Folder 355-373
Nestroy -- Pless.
Box 21 Folder 374-390
Pohl (Die alte Schachtel -- Die Schulreiterin).
Box 22 Folder 391-414
Pohl (Seine Dritte) -- Räder.
Box 23 Folder 415-434
Raupach -- Roger.
Box 24 Folder 435-452
Rosen.
Box 25 Folder 453-476
Salingré (Berliner Kinder -- Pech-Schulze).
Box 26 Folder 477-495
Salingré (Ein verlornes Mädchen) -- Salingré and Jacobson.
Box 27 Folder 496-516
Saul -- Schneider (Die Memoiren des Teufels).
Box 28 Folder 517-539
Schneider (Die schöne Müllerin) -- Schönthan.
Box 29 Folder 540-559
Schröder -- Sudermann.
Box 30 Folder 560-578
Tenelli -- Wichert (Das eiserne Kreuz).
Box 31 Folder 579-604
Wichert (Ein Schritt vom Wege) -- Young.
Box 32 Folder 605-624
Unidentified materials.
Box 32 Folder 625-629

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by author, then by title of work.

Series Description

This series comprises librettos of operas or operettas (as well as one work described in the subtitle as "Posse mit Gesang"), published in connection with performances. The librettos usually include the names of the theater's top personnel (owner, director, artistic director, music director), and often the cast members for a specific performance. They also carry advertisements.

Like the theater rehearsal materials in Series I, these items have been individually cataloged; please see the records in Franklin for additional details.

Physical Description

10 folders

Braun, Karl Johann Ritter von Braunthal. Das Nachtlager in Granada (music by Conradin Kreutzer). Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, 1881.
Box 33 Folder 630
Friedrich, W. Martha (music by Friedrich von Flotow). Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, 1881.
Box 33 Folder 631
Haffner, C. (Carl), and Richard Genée. Die Fledermaus (music by Johann Strauss). Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, 1881.
Box 33 Folder 632
Hopp, Julius. Blaubart (music by Jacques Offenbach). Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, 1881.
Box 33 Folder 633
Hopp, Julius. Die Prinzessin von Trapezunt (music by Jacques Offenbach). Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, circa 1881.
Box 33 Folder 634
Italiener, H. Der Rattenfänger von Hameln (music by Adolph Neuendorff). Germania Theater, New York City, circa 1880-1886.
Box 33 Folder 635
Mannstädt, Wilhelm. Der tolle Wenzel (music by Paul Sentz). Germania Theater, Philadelphia, circa 1888.
Box 33 Folder 636
Die Regimentstochter (music by Gaetano Donizetti). Author of the German libretto unknown (original French libretto by Jean-François-Alfred Bayard and Henri Saint-Georges). Germania Theater, Philadelphia, circa 1881.
Box 33 Folder 637
Treumann, Karl. Pariser Leben! (music by Jacques Offenbach). Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1893.
Box 33 Folder 638
Zell, F. Fatinitza (music by Franz von Suppé). Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, 1881.
Box 33 Folder 639

Physical Description

1 volume

Catalog of Theodor Bloch's Theater Lending Library, Philadelphia, January 1886.
Box 34
Description

Handwritten catalog created by Bloch, in a hard-covered notebook, of rehearsal materials available in his theater lending library located at 442 N. Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Title label pasted to front cover reads: "Catalog von Theater-Stücken, Rollen und Musikalien, welche in der Theater-Leih-Bibliothek von Theodor Bloch enthalten und zu verleihen sind." Includes, at the front, two pages of text clarifying lending conditions. Works in the catalog are listed by title, and are grouped in the following categories: plays without music; plays with music; children's theater; operetta; opera - texts. For each title the following information is noted: genre (e.g. Posse, Lustspiel); number of acts; author; number of male roles; number of female roles; and number of children's roles [?].

The majority of the files of materials found in Series I (theater rehearsal materials) and Series IV (musical scores) in the Learned Collection are in some way labeled as having belonged to Theodor Bloch and/or to his theater lending library. When such evidence is present, it has been noted in catalog records in Franklin; 134 of the 168 records contain such mentions, and those files can be located by doing a combined search for title (Learned Collection) and the general keywords: Theodor Bloch.

Arrangment

Arranged alphabetically by composer, then by title of work.

Note

With only one exception, musical scores are associated with plays for which theater rehearsal materials can be found in Series I; the location of those related materials is indicated. In the catalog records for the plays in Franklin, the presence of music has been noted, and the records are also accessible by composer name. One file of oversized musical scores is found in series VII.B.

Physical Description

1 box

Bial, Rudolf. Music for Die alte Schachtel (play by Emil Pohl), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 391-397.
Box 35 Folder 640-641
Bial, Rudolf. Music for Die Maurer von Berlin (play by Emil Pohl), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 406-412.
Box 35 Folder 642
Bial, Rudolf. Music for Mein Leopold (play by Adolph L'Arronge), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 263-267.
Box 35 Folder 643
Brahms, Johannes [?]. Possibly from Die schöne Magelone, opus 33, no. 13, undated. Two versions of a musical score for stanzas three and four of Ludwig Tieck's poem "Geliebter, wo zaudert" contained in his story Liebesgeschichte der schönen Magelone und des Grafen Peter von Provence, the text that was the basis for Brahms's Die schöne Magelone.
Box 35 Folder 644
Conradi, August. Music for Der Budiker und sein Kind (play by Hermann Salingré and Eduard Jacobson), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 509-516.
Box 35 Folder 645
Conradi, August. Music for Der Herr Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle (play by Rudolf Kneisel), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 235-240.
Box 35 Folder 646-648
Conradi, August. Music for Robert und Bertram (play by Gustav Räder), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 430-434.
Box 35 Folder 649-650
Conradi, August. Music for Das Volk wie es weint und lacht (by O.F. Berg and David Kalisch), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 50-53.
Box 35 Folder 651-652
Conradi, August. Music for Werther und Lotte, oder: Nachtwächters Erdenwallen (play by Georg Belly), undated. See also oversized scores in Folder 719; and theater rehearsal materials in Folders 35-36.
Box 35 Folder 653
Conradi, August, and Theodor Schaumberg. Music for Bruder Liederlich (play by Emil Pohl), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 398-405.
Box 35 Folder 654-655
Gumbert, Ferdinand. Music for Die Lieder des Musikanten (play by Rudolf Kneisel), April 1894, undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 241-244.
Box 35 Folder 656-657
Hauptner, Thuiskon. Music for Berliner Kinder (play by Hermann Salingré), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 477-487.
Box 35 Folder 658-660
Hauptner, Thuiskon, and Max Telle [?]. Music for Singvögelchen (play by Eduard Jacobson), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 191-192.
Box 35 Folder 661
Hauptner, Thuiskon, and Theodor Schaumberg. Music for Die Afrikanerin (play by Eduard Jacobson), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 184-190.
Box 35 Folder 662-664
Lang, Adolf. Music for Eine Nacht in Berlin (play by Albert Hopf), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 173-179.
Box 35 Folder 665-667
Lang, Adolf. Music for Pech-Schulze (by Hermann Salingré), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 488-495.
Box 35 Folder 668-669
Lauer, C. Harry. Music for Die rothe Liesel (play by Betty Young), circa 1878-1879. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 619-624.
Box 35 Folder 670
Music for Das Lorle (play by August Wilhelm Hesse), undated. Composer unknown. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 168-169.
Box 35 Folder 671
Müller, Adolf. Music for Stadt und Land, oder: Der Viehhändler aus Ober-Oesterreich (play by Friedrich Kaiser), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 225-228.
Box 35 Folder 672
Müller, Adolf. Music for Therese Krones (play by Carl Haffner), undated. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 143-144.
Box 35 Folder 673
Schmidt, Hermann. Music for Kurmärker und Picarde (play by Louis Schneider), 25 January 1878. See also theater rehearsal materials in Folders 535-536.
Box 35 Folder 674

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by name of theater, then chronologically.

Note

Oversized playbills are found in series VII.C. and VII.D.

For a detailed listing of the individual playbills, including information about the performances announced, see the Index to Playbills in the indices at the end of this register.

Physical Description

15 folders

Aurora Dramatic Circle, Café Logeling, New York City, 1889.
Box 36 Folder 675
"The Bijou" at Petersen's Hotel, Sea Isle City, N.J., undated.
Box 36 Folder 675
Deutsches Stadt-Theater, Concordia Halle, Philadelphia, 1874.
Box 36 Folder 676
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1878.
Box 36 Folder 677
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1879.
Box 36 Folder 678
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1880.
Box 36 Folder 679
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1882-1883.
Box 36 Folder 680
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1884.
Box 36 Folder 681
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1885-1886.
Box 36 Folder 682
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1887.
Box 36 Folder 683
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1889.
Box 36 Folder 684
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1890-1891.
Box 36 Folder 685
Maennerchor Hall, Philadelphia, 1886.
Box 36 Folder 686
Stadt-Theater, Philadelphia, 1877.
Box 36 Folder 686
Thalia Theater, 1886.
Box 36 Folder 687
Turner-Halle, Philadelphia, 1875-1876, 1879.
Box 36 Folder 688
Unidentified playbill, 1896. "Theatralische Abend-Unterhaltung"; no location given (features the Philadelphia actor Fritz Weilenbeck).
Box 36 Folder 689

Note

Some newspapers that, due to their fragile condition, have been restored and/or laid flat, have been grouped at the end of the series as "oversized" (subseries C).

For an itemized listing of the extant issues of theater newspapers, including information about the performances advertised, see the Index to Theater Newspapers in the indices at the end of this register.

Physical Description

22 folders

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, April 1878 - March 1879. Includes a miscellaneous newspaper clipping, Philadelphia Tageblatt, 8 November 1878. .
Drawer 35 Folder 690
Germania Theater, Die Bühne, March - August 1880.
Drawer 35 Folder 691
Germania Theater, Die Bühne, October - December 1880.
Drawer 35 Folder 692
Germania Theater, Die Bühne, January - February 1881.
Drawer 35 Folder 693
Germania Theater, Die Bühne, March - November 1881.
Drawer 35 Folder 694
Germania Theater Zeitung, March 1883 - February 1884.
Drawer 35 Folder 695
Germania Theater Zeitung , December 1887-March 1888.
Drawer 35 Folder 696
Germania Theater Zeitung, March - October 1890.
Drawer 35 Folder 697
Germania Theater, February 1891 - February 1893.
Drawer 35 Folder 698
Harmonie Hall, Philadelphia: Harmonie Programme, season 1893-1894.
Drawer 35 Folder 699
Harmonie Hall, Philadelphia: Harmonie Program, season 1897-1898.
Drawer 35 Folder 699
New Park Theatre, Philadelphia, season 1890-1891, vol. 2, no. 4, performances 6-11 October 1890 .
Drawer 35 Folder 700
Saenger-Halle, Belmont Avenue, Newark, N.J., 17-24 November 1889.
Drawer 35 Folder 701
Turner Halle, Philadelphia: Die Bühne, Theater-Programm , 22-27 May 1881.
Drawer 35 Folder 702
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Die Bühne, 1878-1879, 1882.
Drawer 35 Folder 703
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater Zeitung, 1884-1886.
Drawer 35 Folder 704
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater Zeitung, 1887.
Drawer 35 Folder 705
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888 - February 1889.
Drawer 35 Folder 706
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater Zeitung, March 1889, March - April 1890.
Drawer 35 Folder 707
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater, December 1890 - November 1891.
Drawer 35 Folder 708
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater, 1892-1893.
Drawer 35 Folder 709
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theater, January 1894.
Drawer 35 Folder 710
Germania Theater, Philadelphia: Germania Theatre, November 1894 - February 1895.
Drawer 35 Folder 710
Thalia Theater, Philadelphia: Programme, season 1885-1886.
Drawer 35 Folder 711

Amalie, Princess of Saxony. Der Verlobungsring: role book and scenario, undated. See also related items in Folders 12-14 .
Drawer 36 Folder 712-713
Bernard-Valville, François. Die hölzerne Uhr: scenario, undated. See also related items in Folder 54 .
Drawer 36 Folder 714
Clauren, Heinrich. Der Abend im Posthaus: two scenarios (two different versions), undated. See also related items in Folders 85-88.
Drawer 36 Folder 715
Friedrich, W. Dornen und Lorbeer: two role books, undated. See also related items in Folders 109-112.
Drawer 36 Folder 716
Jünger, Johann Friedrich. Die Komödie aus dem Stegreif: scenario, undated. See also related items in Folders 202-203 .
Drawer 36 Folder 717
Mels, August. Junge Leiden: role book, undated. See also related items in Folders 308-310.
Drawer 36 Folder 718
Conradi, August. Music for Werther und Lotte (by George Belly): "Auftrittslied," "Nachtwächterlied," undated. See also scores in Folder 653; and theater rehearsal materials in Folders 35-36 .
Drawer 36 Folder 719
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1879-1883.
Drawer 36 Folder 720
Contents

* 28-29 January [1879] (21" x 9")
* 6 November 1879 (26" x 10")
* 3 March [1881] (26" x 10")
* 3-7 November 1881 (26" x 10")
* 10 May 1883 (26" x 10")
* 1 January [1884] (16-1/2" x 6-1/2"; two copies)

Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1887-1888.
Drawer 36 Folder 721
Contents

* 28 April 1887 (26" x 10"; four copies)
* 19-21 September [1887] (26" x 10")
* 3-5 November [1887] (26" x 10")
* 10-15 February [1888] (26" x 10")

Other theaters.
Drawer 36 Folder 722
Contents

* Residenz-Theater (Blumenstr. 9 und Wallner-Theaterstr. 16), Berlin, 2 June 1873. Originally pasted to the inside front cover of a copy of the play belonging to Theodor Bloch. (16-1/2" x 14")
* Turner Halle, Philadelphia, 16 September 1875 (13" x 10")
* Turner Halle, Philadelphia, 8 June 1876 (20" x 13"; two copies)
* Maennerchor Hall, Philadelphia, 26-28 April [circa 1878] (23" x 8-3/4")
* Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, 14-17 Jan. [1882] (26" x 10")
* Stadt-Theater, Kump's Hall, Kansas City, 4 March 1883 (26" x 10")
* Thalia Theater, Philadelphia, 22-24 March 1886 (26" x 10")
* Thalia Theater, Philadelphia, 28 March 1886 (26" x 10")

Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 4-9 March [1889] (25-1/2" x 18-1/2"; three copies) , 1889.
Drawer 36 Folder 723
Germania Theater, Philadelphia, 1890.
Drawer 36 Folder 724
Contents

* 11-15 April 1890 (25-1/2" x 18-1/2"; two copies)
* 10-11 November 1890 (25-1/2" x 18-1/2")
* 8-15 April [1891] (25-1/2" x 18-1/2")

[Germania Theater, Philadelphia]. Poster advertising Fräul. Martha Wedemeyer as Eliza in Uncle Tom's Cabin, circa December 1880 (36-3/4" x 15-1/2") .
Drawer 36 Folder 725
Unidentified poster (43-1/2" x 30-1/2"), undated. Drawing in black and aqua, possibly depicting a scene from a play. "Ledger Print Phila." appears in lower left. See Dietrich poster shelves.
Appendix 1: List of Theater Venues Represented in the Learned Collection.
Theater Venues in Philadelphia

* Concordia-Halle, 417-427 Callowhill Street

Built in 1868-1869, on the site of another theatrical venue that had burned down. The site was originally known as the City Museum. In the 1870s Concordia-Halle was the venue for German-language theater productions under the rubric Deutsches Stadt-Theater (playbill, folder 676) or Stadt-Theater (playbill, folder 686).

In December 1880, the Concordia Operetten-Theater opened in this hall, managed through 1881 by Robert Tagg (librettos, box 33).

From around fall 1885 to spring 1886 Thalia Theater operated at the same location under the directorship of Alexander Kost (playbills, folders 687, 722; theater newspapers, folder 711).

* Concordia Operetten-Theater –– see under: Concordia-Halle

* Deutsches Stadt-Theater –– see under: Concordia-Halle.

* Dramatic Hall, 509 S. Fifth Street

A performance of a German-language play at this location is advertised in the Turner Halle theater newspaper of May 1881 (folder 702).

* Germania Theater, 528-532 N. Third Street (near the intersection with Spring Garden)

Opened on this site around fall 1877, in Ladner's Miliary Hall, which was built in 1857 and operated by the brothers Fritz and Louis Ladner. The hall was leased by Gottlob Hammer and Henry Oberkirsch as a venue for Germania Theater beginning in August 1877. In 1881, it was rebuilt as a permanent home for Germania Theater, which continued in operation until approximately March 1895. The majority of the materials in the collection relate to this theater (playbills, folders 677-685, 720-721; theater newspapers, folders 690-698, 703-710).

* Harmonie Hall, 525-533 N. Eleventh Street (corner of Brandywine)

German-language theater productions at this location are advertised in theater newspapers dating from 1893 to 1898 (folder 699).

* Ladner's Military Hall –– see under: Germania Theater

* Maennerchor Hall (also: Maennerchor Garden), northeast corner of Franklin Street and Fairmount Avenue

Operated by Robert Tagg beginning in November 1876. The collection contains playbills from German-language theater productions at this location dating from circa 1878 (folder 722) and from 1886 (folder 686).

* New Park Theatre, corner of Broad Street and Fairmount Avenue

A theater newspaper in the collection related to this venue dates from the 1890-1891 season (folder 700).

* Stadt-Theater –– see under: Concordia-Halle

* Thalia Theater –– see under: Concordia-Halle

* Turner Halle, 444 & 446 N. Third Street (between Willow and Noble)

Established by the Turngemeinde Philadelphia in 1858 to 1860. German-language theater productions were given at this venue under rubrics such as Deutsches Theater in der Turner-Halle and Turner-Halle Theater. Pertinent materials in the collection date from 1873 to 1881 (playbills, folders 688, 702; theater newspaper, folder 702; see also Appendix 2: List of Newspaper Advertisements for Performances in Turner Halle, 1873-1875).


Theater Venues Outside of Philadelphia

* Aurora Dramatic Circle, Café Logeling, 237 E. 57th Street, New York, N.Y. (playbill, folder 675)

* The Bijou, Petersen's Hotel, corner of Landis and Fritz Street, Sea Isle City, N.J. (playbill, folder 675)

* Germania Theater, 145-147 East 14th Street (between Third Avenue and Irving Place; Tammany Hall), New York, N.Y.

Founded by Adolf Neuendorff in 1872; operated at this location until 1881 (libretto, folder 635)

* Residenz-Theater, Blumenstraße 9 und Wallner-Theaterstraße 16, Berlin, Germany (playbill, folder 722)

* Saenger-Halle, Belmont Avenue, Newark, N.J. (theater newspaper, folder 701)

* Stadt-Theater, Kump's Hall, Main and Tenth Street, Kansas City, Mo. (playbill, folder 722)

Arrangement and Description

Clippings of newspaper advertisements for the following performances, listed in chronological order, are located in files for theater rehearsal materials in Series I. In each case, the clipping is pasted to the inside front cover of a published copy of the play that was used as a prompt book. With respect to documentation of specific performances in Philadelphia in which the rehearsal materials were used, these clippings, many of which are dated in 1873, supplement the collection's playbills and theater newspapers, which date from no earlier than 1874.

13 August 1873, Deutsches Sommer-Theater, Turnerhalle: performance of Ein jüdischer Dienstbote, by Carl Elmar .
Folder 100
29 August 1873, Turnerhalle Sommer-Theater: performance of Die Pfarrersköchin, by O. F. Berg .
Folder 46
16 September 1873, Turnerhalle Sommer-Theater: performance of Maria und Magdalena, by Paul Lindau .
Folder 271
23 September 1873, Turnerhalle Sommer-Theater: performance of Die Mönche, by M. Tenelli .
Folder 579
6 October 1873, Turnerhalle Sommer-Theater: performance of Eine Zeitungsente, by Rudolf Kneisel .
Folder 249
16 October 1873, Turnerhalle Sommer-Theater: performance of Johannisfeuer, oder: Der Gemskönig, by Arthur Müller .
Folder 355
10 November 1873, Turnerhalle Sommer-Theater: performance of Ein freier Mann, by Julius Rosen .
Folder 466
17 November 1873, Turnerhalle-Theater: performance of Washington, der Befreier Nord-Amerika's, by Georg Schönfeldt .
Folder 546
25 December 1873, Turnerhalle-Theater: performance of Eine Nacht in Berlin, by Albert Hopf .
Folder 173
4 May 1874, Deutsches Theater in der Turner-Halle: performance of Berliner Kinder, by Hermann Salingré .
Folder 477
2 June 1874, Deutsches Theater in der Turner-Halle: performance of Die Tochter Belial's, by Rudolf Kneisel .
Folder 245
17 July 1874, Deutsches Theater in der Turner-Halle: performance of Zwei Tage aus dem Leben eines Fürsten, by Johann Ludwig Deinhardstein .
Folder 93
13 October 1875, Deutsches Theater in der Turner-Halle: performance of Junge Leiden, by August Mels .
Folder 308

Arrangement and Description

The following theater rehearsal materials are highlighted because they may possibly be of a provenance different from that of the other materials in the collection (see Scope and Contents note, above). Based on their appearance, the materials were probably created before 1870. They are listed alphabetically by author of the work to be performed, with unidentified works at the end.

Amalie, Princess of Saxony, Der Verlobungsring, undated.
Folder 12-14, 712-713
Bernard-Valville, François, Die hölzerne Uhr , undated.
Folder 54, 714
Blum, Carl, Die Mäntel , undated.
Folder 72-73
Castelli, Ignaz Franz, Fünf sind zwei, oder: Domestikenstreiche , undated.
Folder 82-83
Castelli, Ignaz Franz, Klimpern gehört zum Handwerk, undated.
Folder 84
Clauren, Heinrich, Der Abend im Posthaus, undated.
Folder 85-88, 715
Contessa, Karl Wilhelm Salice, Das Räthsel, undated.
Folder 89-90
Deinhardstein, Johann Ludwig, Das Bild der Danae , 1837 [?].
Folder 91-92
Feldmann, Leopold, Das Portrait der Geliebten, undated.
Folder 107-108
Houwald, Ernst von, Der Geburtstag der Mutter, undated.
Folder 180-181
Jünger, Johann Friedrich, Die Komödie aus dem Stegreif , undated.
Folder 202-203, 717
Kurländer, Franz August von, Der Todte in Verlegenheit, undated.
Folder 254-256
Lafontaine, August Heinrich Julius, Die Prüfung der Treue, oder: Die Irrungen, undated.
Folder 257
Oswald, Die Theaterprobe , undated.
Folder 381-383
Töpfer, Karl Friedrich Gustav, Nehmt ein Exempel dran!, 1837.
Folder 585-587
Unidentified two-act play, undated. Characters: Geheimrath, Angelika, Peter von Platz, Baron Siegmund, Paul, Kellner/Husar .
Folder 625-627
Unidentified one-act play, undated. 17 scenes. Characters: Der Oberst, Auguste, Anton, Neumann .
Folder 628

Arrangement and Description

The following listing of playbills in the collection is organized first by theater name, in alphabetical order. Within each grouping, the playbills are then listed chronologically, with each entry detailing the titles of plays, operas, or operettas advertised (the holdings include one copy of each playbill, unless multiple copies are noted). The playbills also sometimes announce a musical program or give additional information about performances, all the details of which could not be included here.

In addition to listing the work(s) featured on the playbill, this index also includes, at the end of the entry, any additional works that are advertised only briefly, often as "In preparation." Those abbreviated announcements sometimes include such information as the guest appearance of a certain actor or actress, or the dedication of the performance as a benefit for a particular person, although often only the title of the work appears.

In cases of works that are advertised by title only, the author's name has been supplied in brackets, if it could be determined with reasonable certainty.

In the case of works that are adaptations, the author and title of the source work have been included to whatever extent that information could be determined.

Following is an overview of the distribution of playbills among the theaters represented:

1. Aurora Dramatic Circle, Café Logeling, New York, N.Y. (one playbill)

2. The Bijou, Petersen's Hotel, Sea Isle City, N.J. (one playbill)

3. Concordia Operetten-Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. (one oversized playbill)––see also under Librettos, series II, box 33

4. Deutsches Stadt-Theater, Concordia Halle, Philadelphia, Pa. (one playbill)

5. Germania Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. (42 playbills and 14 oversized playbills)

6. Maennerchor Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. (one playbill and one oversized playbill)

7. Residenz-Theater, Berlin, Germany (one oversized playbill)

8. Stadt-Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. (one playbill)

9. Stadt-Theater, Kump's Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (one oversized playbill)

10. Thalia Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. (three playbills and two oversized playbills)

11. Turner-Halle, Philadelphia, Pa. (four playbills and two oversized playbills)

12. Unidentified (one playbill)

Aurora Dramatic Circle playbill.
Folder 675
4 May 1889

Gute Nacht [by Rudolf Hahn]

The Bijou playbill.
Folder 675
undated

"To-Night at the Bijou (Petersen's Hotel)" (playbill is mostly in English)
* Wie man Landluft geniesst [by C. A. Görner]
* Barber and Banker (in English) [author unknown]

Concordia Operetten-Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 722
14-17 January [1882]

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang
Also advertised:
* Die Großherzogin von Geroldstein [presumably the comic opera composed by Jacques Offenbach, with German text by Julius Hopp, based on the original French libretto Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy]
Also listed as "in preparation":
* Olivette [composer/author unknown]
* Pariser Leben [presumably the operetta composed by Jacques Offenbach, with German text by Karl Treumann, based on the original French libretto La vie parisienne, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy]
* Der Waffenschmied [presumably the comic opera by Albert Lortzing]

Deutsches Stadt-Theater playbill.
Folder 676
22 March 1874

* Robert und Bertram, oder: Die (heiligen) lustigen Vagabunden, by Gustav Räder, with music by August Conradi

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 677
21 February 1878

* Die Afrikanerin, by Eduard Jacobson, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 677
14 March 1878

* Die schöne Galathée, operetta composed by Franz von Suppé, with libretto by Poly Henrion
Also advertised:
* Ein Wechsel, by F. Wolterich [=F. Woltereck]
* Die Wacht am Rhein, by Oscar Elsner

Germania Theater playbill (six copies).
Folder 677
31 March - 1 April 1878

* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten, by Friedrich Adami [based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père)]

Germania Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 677
4 April 1878

Die Bettlerin von Marienberg [=Die Bettlerin], by Julius Meissner [based on a play in French by Michel Masson]

Germania Theater playbill (bears handwritten emendations).
Folder 677
5 September 1878

* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 677
7 November 1878

* Luftschlösser, oder: Viel Vergnügen, by Heinrich Wilken

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 678
2 January 1879

* Onkel Tom's Hütte [=Onkel Tom], by Therese von Megerle, based on the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 21" x 9").
Folder 720
28-29 January [1879]

* Die eiserne Maske, by L. Schneider [based on the French play L'homme au masque de fer by Auguste Jean François Arnould and Narcisse Fournier]
Also advertised:
* Die drei Langhänse [by Fritz Reuter]

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 678
24-28 May 1879

* Citronen (Lemons), by Julius Rosen
Also advertised:
* Bruder Liederlich, by Emil Pohl, with music by August Conradi
* Singvögelchen [by Eduard Jacobson, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner]
* Der Sohn der Wildniss [by Friedrich Halm]
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Die Karlsschüler [by Heinrich Laube]

Germania Theater playbill (four copies).
Folder 678
19 June 1879

* Maria und Magdalena, by Paul Lindau

Germania Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 678
28 August - 1 September 1879

* Maria Stuart, by Friedrich Schiller
* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul

Germania Theater playbill (eight copies).
Folder 678
4-6 September 1879

* Die Hexe von Leonberg, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 678
20-23 September 1879

* Stadt und Land, oder: Der Viehhändler aus Oberösterreich [by Friedrich Kaiser]

Germania Theater playbill playbill (two copies).
Folder 678
6 November 1879

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 720
6 November 1879

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 678
27 November 1879

* Mariette und Jeanetton, oder: Die Heirath vor der Trommel, by W. Friedrich, based on a work in French by Alexandre Dumas (père)
Also advertised:
* Aschenbrödel, oder: Der gläserne Pantoffel, by C. A. Görner
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Philippine Welser [possibly the play by Oskar von Redwitz]

Germania Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 678
11 December 1879

* Ein Engel, by Julius Rosen

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 678
13-17 December [1879]

* Die alte Schachtel, by Emil Pohl, based on a play of the same title by O. F. Berg
Also advertised:
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame [presumably the play by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer based on the French novel Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo]

Germania Theater playbill (eight copies).
Folder 679
5 Feburary 1880

* Die Bettlerin von Marienberg [=Die Bettlerin], [by Julius Meissner, based on a play in French] by Michel Masson

Germania Theater playbill (eleven copies).
Folder 679
11 March 1880

* Wenn man im Dunkeln küßt (A Kiss in the Dark), by Carl Mallachow and Oskar Elsner

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 679
13-15 March 1880

* Berliner Kinder, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Wohlthätige Frauen [by Adolph L'Arronge]

Germania Theater playbill (four copies).
Folder 679
18 March 1880

* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater playbill (six copies).
Folder 679
27-28 April [1880]

* Ein jüdischer Dienstbote, by Carl Elmar
Also advertised:
* Wohlthätige Frauen, by Adolph L'Arronge

Germania Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 679
15 August 1880

* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul

Germania Theater playbill (oversized poster, 36-3/4" x 15-1/2").
Folder 725
circa December 1880

* Uncle Tom's Cabin, color image of the character "Eliza" played by "Fräul. Martha Wedemeyer," with banner: "Rial & Draper's / Ideal"
Presumably dates from the performance of Onkel Tom's Hütte (=Onkel Tom, by Therese von Megerle, based on the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe) on 9-10 December 1880 at Germania Theater––see Germania theater newspaper, Die Bühne, 1880, no. 76, folder 692.

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 720
3 March [1881]

* Die Bettlerin von Marienberg, [by Julius Meissner, based on a play in French] by Michel Masson

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 720
3-7 November 1881

* Die Dame mit den Camelien, [by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias] by Alexandre Dumas (fils)
* Der Jongleur, oder: Die Kunstreiter von Berlin und Leipzig, by Emil Pohl
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Pikante Enthüllungen [presumably the play by Emil Artur]
* Die Zigeuner [author unknown]
* 500,000 Teufel [author unknown]

Germania Theater playbill (four copies).
Folder 680
8-10 April [1882]

* Stadt und Land, oder: Der Viehhändler aus Oberösterreich, by Friedrich Kaiser
Also advertised:
* Die Näherin [possibly the play by Ludwig Held with music by Carl Millöcker]
* Krethi und Plethi, by David Kalisch

Germania Theater playbill (seven copies).
Folder 680
10 May 1883

* Unsere Frauen [by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan]

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 720
10 May 1883

* Unsere Frauen, by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan

Germania Theater playbill (8 copies).
Folder 680
9-11 November 1883

* Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott, by Arthur Müller
Also advertised:
* Der Verschwender, by Ferdinand Raimund
* 500,000 Teufel [author unknown]

Germania Theater playbill (five copies).
Folder 680
6 December 1883

* Der Bibliothekar, by Gustav von Moser

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 680
23 December [1883]

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang
Also advertised:
* Lumpaci Vagabundus, oder: Das liederliche Kleeblatt [=Der böse Geist Lumpazivavagabundus, by Johann Nestroy]
* Die schöne Klosterbäuerin, oder: Der Meuchelmord auf dem Friedhofe, by Franz Prüller

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 16-1/2" x 6-1/2; two copies).
Folder 720
1 January [1884]

* Die Pariser Bluthochzeit, oder: Die Schreckensherrschaft in der Bartholomäus Nacht [=Königin Margot und die Hugenotten], by Friedrich Adami based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père)

Germania Theater playbill (nine copies).
Folder 681
27 January 1884

* Die Bettlerin von Marienberg [=Die Bettlerin], [by Julius Meissner, based on a play in French] by Michel Masson

Germania Theater playbill (eight copies).
Folder 681
30 January [1884]

* Eine Nacht in Berlin, oder: Onkel Bergemann, by Albert Hopf, with music by Adolf Lang

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 681
5 October [1884]

* Die beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno, with music by G. Bätz
Also advertised:
* Die Geheimnisse von Philadelphia [author unknown]
Also listed as "in preparation":
* Apfelröschen [by Heinrich Wilken and Oskar Justinus]
* Ein Gottesurtheil [author unknown]
* Schützliesel[possibly: Schützen-Lies'l, by Leon Treptow]
* Herzensfritz [presumably: Mein Herzensfritz, by Wilhelm Mannstädt and Heinrich Wilken]
* Des Schulmeisters Töchterlein [by Krüger]
* Liebhabereien [presumably the play by Emil Pohl]
* Geierwally [presumably an adaptation of the novel Die Geier-Wally by Wilhelmine von Hillern]
* Lumpenmüller's Lieschen [author unknown]

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 681
30 November [1884]

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and David Kalisch, with music by August Conradi
Also advertised:
* Wilhelm Tell [by Friedrich Schiller]

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 682
5-6 April [1885]

* Die Afrikanerin, by Eduard Jacobson, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
Also advertised:
* Der Rattenfänger von Hameln, by C. A. Görner, based on the history of the town of Hameln by Friedrich Sprenger and a chronical by Ehrick, with music by Ernst Catenhusen

Germania Theater playbill (three copies).
Folder 682
6-10 March [1886]

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang
Also advertised:
* Die alte Jungfer, by Roderich Benedix

Germania Theater playbill (on cardboard, with color image).
Folder 683
18 February 1887

* Maria und Magdalena, by Paul Lindau

Germania Theater playbill (two copies, one orange and one yellow).
Folder 683
28 April 1887

(a) - One of two small-format playbills bearing same date; includes an image of scene from the play but no cast listing.

* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul

Germania Theater playbill (four copies).
Folder 683
28 April 1887

(b) - One of two small-format playbills bearing the same date; includes cast listing

* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10"; four copies).
Folder 721
28 April 1887

* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 721
19-21 September [1887]

* Doctor Klaus, by Adolph L'Arronge

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 721
3-5 November [1887]

* Gaston, der Mann mit der eisernen Maske [=Die eiserne Maske], by L. Schneider based on the French play L'homme au masque de fer by Auguste Jean François Arnould and Narcisse Fournier
Also advertised:
* Wilhelm Tell, by Friedrich Schiller

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 721
10-15 February [1888]

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and David Kalisch, with music by August Conradi
Also advertised:
* Die goldene Spinne [by Franz von Schönthan]
* Die Regimentstochter [by Carl Blum]
* Das Mädel ohne Geld [by Eduard Jacobson]

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 25-1/2" x 18-1/2"; 3 copies).
Folder 723
4-9 March [1889]

* Unter der Erde, oder: Arbeit bringt Segen, by Carl Elmar, with music by Franz von Suppé
* Cora, die Tochter des Pflanzers [=Cora, das Kind des Pflanzers], by Paul Victor Wichmann [based on the French play Cora, ou: L'esclavage, by Jules Barbier]
Also advertised:
* Eine Ehe von heute, by Victorien Sardou, translated from the French by Heinrich Laube

Germania Theater playbill (four copies).
Folder 684
6 March 1889

(a) - One of the two playbills bearing the same date; features plot summary
* Cora, die Tochter des Pflanzers [=Cora, das Kind des Pflanzers], by Paul Victor Wichmann [based on the French play Cora, ou: L'esclavage, by Jules Barbier]

Germania Theater playbill (six copies).
Folder 684
6 March 1889

(b) - One of the two playbills bearing the same date

* Cora, die Tochter des Pflanzers [=Cora, das Kind des Pflanzers], by Paul Victor Wichmann [based on the French play Cora, ou: L'esclavage, by Jules Barbier]

Germania Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 685
5 March 1890

* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, oder: Der alte Dessauer und sein Fähnrich, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 25-1/2" x 18-1/2"; two copies).
Folder 724
11-15 April 1890

* Raub der Sabinerinnen (A Night Off), by Franz and Paul von Schönthan
* Die Dame mit den Camelien, [by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias] by Alexandre Dumas (fils)
Also advertised:
* Die Spitzenkönigin [by Hugo Müller and Adolph L'Arronge]
* Die Ehre [by Hermann Sudermann]

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 25-1/2" x 18-1/2").
Folder 724
10-11 November 1890

* Turandot, Prinzessin von China, by Friedrich Schiller
Also advertised:
* Nervös, by Gustav von Moser and Otto Girndt

Germania Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 685
8 April 1891

* Die Tochter der Hölle, oder: Mensch bezahle deine Schulden [=Die Tochter Belial's], by Rudolf Kneisel

Germania Theater playbill (oversized, 25-1/2" x 18-1/2").
Folder 724
8-15 April [1891]

* Die Tochter der Hölle, oder: Mensch bezahle deine Schulden [=Die Tochter Belial's], by Rudolf Kneisel
* Comtesse Helene, by J. B. Schweitzer and Hermann Salingré, with music by Rudolf Bial
Also advertised:
* Krieg im Frieden [by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan]

Germania Theater playbill.
Folder 685
circa 28 November 1891

* Berliner Kinder, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner

Deutsches Theater, Maennerchor Halle playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 722
26-28 April [circa 1878]

* Citronen, by Julius Rosen
Also advertised:
* Luftschlösser [author unknown; there are at least two plays by this title, one by Wilhelm Mannstädt and A. Weller, and the other by Heinrich Wilken]

Maennerchor Halle playbill (in English and German).
Folder 686
28 March 1886

* Ein sehr delicater Auftrag, by Edward Bloch [=Eduard Bloch], based on the French play Chez une petite dame [author of the original French play unknown]

Residenz-Theater playbill (oversized, 16-1/2" x 14").
Folder 722
2 June 1873

* Die alten Junggesellen, [based on the French play Les vieux garçons] by Victorien Sardou [translator unknown]

Stadt-Theater playbill.
Folder 686
14 January 1877

(date according to handwritten annotation)

* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten, by Friedrich Adami [based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père)]

Stadt-Theater (Kump's Halle) playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 722
4 March 1883

* Das Haus Rothschild, oder: Wie man den Grundstein zu Millionen legt, by Adolph Reich

Thalia Theater playbill (two copies).
Folder 687
17 March 1886

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and David Kalisch, with music by August Conradi

Thalia Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 722
22-24 March 1886

* Berliner Kinder, oder: Was sich die Kaserne erzählt, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
Also advertised:
* Catharina Howard [possibly: Katharina Howard, by Eduard Jerrmann]

Thalia Theater playbill (fragment of the oversize playbill above; two copies).
Folder 687
[22-24 March 1886]

* Berliner Kinder, oder: Was sich die Kaserne erzählt, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner

Thalia Theater playbill (oversized, 26" x 10") .
Folder 722
28 March 1886

* Lucretia Borgia, by Alexander Preuss based on the French play Lucrèce Borgia by Victor Hugo

Thalia Theater playbill (eight copies) .
Folder 687
Week of 1 April [1886]

* Lucretia Borgia [by Alexander Preuss based on the French play Lucrèce Borgia by Victor Hugo]
Also advertised:
* Pech-Schulze [by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang]

Thalia Theater playbill (six copies) .
Folder 687
[circa 1886]

* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer based on the French novel Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo

Sommer-Theater in der Turner-Halle playbill.
Folder 688
29 July 1875

* Die Hexe von Leonberg, by Arthur Müller

Deutsches Theater in der Turner Halle playbill (oversized, 26" x 10").
Folder 722
16 September 1875

* Sternenjungfrau, oder: Der letzte Mensch! by Carl Haffner, with music by Theodor Schaumberg (music director for the Turner-Halle Theater)

Deutsches Theater in der Turner Halle playbill (oversized, 26" x 10"; two copies).
Folder 722
8 June 1876

* Robert und Bertram, by Gustav Räder, with music by August Conradi

Turner Halle Theater play bill (fourteen copies).
Folder 688
5-6 December [1876]

* Eine feste Burg ist unser Gott [=Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott], by Arthur Müller
Also advertised:
* Herr Mengler, oder: Endlich hat er es doch gut gemacht [by Albin von Meddlhammer]

Turner Halle Theater playbill .
Folder 688
14 December 1876

Therese Krones, by Carl Haffner, with music by Adolf Müller

Turner-Halle playbill .
Folder 688
13 February 1879

* Die Sternenjungfrau, oder: Der letzte Mensch, by Carl Haffner

"Theatralische Abend-Unterhaltung" (unidentified theater).
Folder 689
23 October 1896

* Die Tante aus Schwaben, by Feodor von Wehl
* Li Hong Joe, der Rattenkönig [author unknown]
* Das Schwert des Damokles, by Gustav Heinrich Gans von und zu Putlitz

Arrangement and Description

The organization of the following listing of theater newspapers is comparable to that of the above Index to Playbills––the items are grouped first by theater name, in alphabetical order, and then listed chronologically, with each entry detailing the plays, operas, or operettas announced in that issue. (The holdings include one copy of each issue, unless multiple copies are noted.)

Dates primarily reflect the way the newspaper issue is dated; it was not possible to include the exact date(s) of performance of the individual works advertised.

The announcements for the featured works in any given issue typically give a full cast listing. As in the Index to Playbills, this index also includes, at the end of the entry, works that are advertised only briefly, often as "In preparation." Those abbreviated announcements sometimes include such information as the guest appearance of a certain actor or actress, or the dedication of the performance as a benefit for a particular person, although often only the title of the work appears.

In cases of works that are advertised by title only, the author's name has been supplied in brackets, if it could be determined with reasonable certainty.

In the case of works that are adaptations, the author and title of the source work have been included to whatever extent that information could be determined.

Please note that the details given in this index about the content of theater newspapers concern only the theatrical performances advertised. Other types of content, including announcements of concerts, festivals, and other events, could not be taken into account here. The newspapers also usually give information about the theater management, and carry numerous business advertisements.

Following is an overview of the distribution of newspapers among theaters represented, and of masthead changes:

1. Germania Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. (102 issues)
* April 1878–April 1881; November 1881: Die Bühne
* May 1882–October 1885; April 1886-October 1890: Germania Theater Zeitung
* December 1890–January 1894: Germania Theater
* November 1894–1895: Germania Theatre

2. Harmonie Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. (two issues)
* season 1893-1894: Harmonie Programme
* season 1897-1898: Harmonie Program

3. New Park Theatre, Philadelphia, Pa. (one issue)
* season 1890-1891: New Park Theatre Programme (one issue)

4. Saenger-Halle, Newark, N.J. (one issue)
* 17 November 1889

Note: Saenger-Halle appears to have been an out-of-town venue for Sunday performances of the theater company that otherwise performed at Germania Theater in Philadelphia.

5. Thalia Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. (five issues)
* December 1885–March 1886: Thalia Theater Programme

6. Turner-Halle, Philadelphia, Pa. (one issue)
* 22-27 May 1881: Die Bühne. Theater-Programm

Note: Turner-Halle appears to have functioned as a temporary venue in Philadelphia for the theater company that otherwise performed at Germania Theater.

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 1 .
Folder 690
19 April 1878

* Torpedoes, oder: Ein Staats-Geheimnis! by J. B. von Schweitzer and Hermann Salingré
* Citronen (Lemons), by Julius Rosen
* Die Schleichhändler, by Ernst Raupach

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 2 .
Folder 690
26 April 1878

* Die Tochter der Harfenistin, by Rudolf Kneisel and Eduard Jacobson, with music by Gustav Michaelis
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer based on the French novel Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo
* Strauß und Lanner, by Anton Langer

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 6 .
Folder 703
24 May 1878

* Der Viehhändler aus Ober-Österreich, oder: Stadt und Land [=Stadt und Land], by Friedrich Kaiser
* Faust, by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
* Pauvrette, W. Lautz

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 9 .
Folder 703
14 June 1878

* East Lynne [translation and dramatic adaptation of the English novel by Mrs. Henry Wood; translator/adapter unknown]
* Schloß Greiffenstein, oder: Der Sammtschuh, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer
* Robert und Bertram, oder: Die lustigen Vagabund, by Gustav Räder

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 11.
Folder 690
28 June 1878

* Lockere Zeisige! by O. F. Berg and Eduard Jacobson
* Citronen (Lemons), by Julius Rosen
* Der Verschwender, by Ferdinand Raimund

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 12 .
Folder 690
5 July 1878

* Das Milchmädchen aus Schöneberg, by Wilhelm Mannstädt
* Die beiden Waisen [translation of the French play Les deux orphelines, by Adolphe d'Ennery and Eugène Cormon]
* Die alte Schachtel, by Emil Pohl [based on a play of the same title by O. F. Berg]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 19 .
Folder 690
23 August 1878

* Die Rose von Bacharach, by Theodor Gassmann
* Die Anna-Liese, oder: Der alten Dessauer Jugendliebe [=Die Anna-Lise], by Hermann Hersch
* Die Mönche, oder: Das Geheimniss eines Nonnenklosters, by M. Tenelli

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 20 .
Folder 703
30 August 1878

* Theater-Schülerin, oder: Verfehlter Beruf, by Emil Pohl, with music by Heinrich Wilhelm
* Die Hexe von Leonberg, by Arthur Müller
* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 25 .
Folder 703
4 October 1878

* Eine Nacht in Berlin, by Albert Hopf
* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul (B. Scheiden)
* Der Maurer von Ronquerolles, oder: Die Memoiren des Teufels [=Die Memoiren des Teufels], by L. Schneider, based on the French play Les mémoires du diable, by Etienne Arago and Paul Vermond (pseudonym of Eugène Guinot)

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 26 (two copies).
Folder 703
11 October 1878

* Gewonnene Herzen, by Hugo Müller
* Frauenkampf, by Olfers based on the French play Bataille de dames by Eugène Scribe and Ernest LeGouvé
* Eine silberne Hochzeit, oder: Das Jubel-Paar, by M. Bauermeister
* O diese Weiber, by Emil Pohl

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 28 (three copies).
Folder 690
25 October 1878

* Deborah, by S. H. Mosenthal
* Eine Nacht in Berlin, by Albert Hopf
* Aschenbrödel, by C. A. Görner

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 29 .
Folder 690
1 November 1878

* Rose Michel, by Victorien Sardou [original in French; translator/adapter unknown]
* Singvögelchen, operetta by Eduard Jacobson, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
* Ein freier Mann, by Julius Rosen

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 30 .
Folder 703
8 November 1878

* Die Schillerlocke, oder: Gräfin Male [=Der Budiker und sein Kind], by Hermann Salingré and Eduard Jacobson
* Einen Jux will er sich machen, by Johann Nestroy
* Maria Stuart, by Friedrich Schiller

Philadelphia Tageblatt – miscellaneous newspaper clipping (not a theater newspaper); contains an ad for that day's performance at Germania Theater .
Folder 690
8 November 1878

* Luftschlösser, oder Viel Vergnügen [by Heinrich Wilken]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 31.
Folder 690
15 November 1878

* Die rothe Liesel, by Betty Young, with music by Lauer
* Dorf und Stadt, oder: Das Lorle vom Schwarzwald, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer, based on the stories (Dorfgeschichten) of Berthold Auerbach
* Mein Leopold (My Son), by Adolph L'Arronge, with music by Rudolf Bial

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 33 .
Folder 703
29 November 1878

* Othello, der Mohr von Venedig, by Shakespeare [translator unknown]
* Schuster-Pluster, oder: Wenn Leute Geld haben! [=Wenn Leute Geld haben!], by August Weirauch, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
* Der jüdische Dienstbote [=Ein jüdischer Dienstbote], by Carl Elmar
Also advertised:
* Hasemann's Töchter [by Adolph L'Arronge]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 45 (one complete and one fragmentary copy) .
Folder 703
21 February 1879

* Washington, Befreier Nord-Amerikas, by Georg Schönfeldt
* Die rothe Liesel, by Betty Young
* Der Stumme von Manchester, by Fr. Rainer
Also advertised:
* Der Hypochonder, oder: Unsere Stadtväter (Our Alderman), by Gustav von Moser
* Uriel Acosta, by Karl Gutzkow
* Heidemann und Sohn, by Hugo Müller

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, vol. 1, no. 48 (two copies) .
Folder 690
14 March 1879

* Doctor Klaus, by Adolph L'Arronge
* Mathilde, ein Weib wie es sein soll, by Roderich Benedix
* Ihrer Majestät Schiff Pinafore, oder: Die Seemannsbraut, comic opera by W. S. Gilbert, with music by Sir Arthur Sullivan (title of original: H. M. S. Pinafore), translated by Biedermann
Also advertised:
* Uriel Acosta, by Karl Gutzkow

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 1 (two copies).
Folder 691
16-22 March 1880

* Englisch, oder: Banquier Ippelberger aus Leipzig, by C. A. Görner
* Wiener in Berlin, by Karl von Holtei
* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, by Arthur Müller
* Harun al Raschid und seine Schwiegermutter, by Gustav von Moser

Germania Theater (three copies).
Folder 691
15-19 May 1880

* Die Sternenjungfrau, oder: Der letzte Mensch, by Carl Haffner
* Schuster-Pluster, oder: Wenn Leute Geld haben! [=Wenn Leute Geld haben!], by August Weirauch
* Das böse Fräulein [by Rudolf Kneisel]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 13 (three copies).
Folder 691
29-31 May 1880

* Stadt und Land, oder: Der Viehhändler aus Ober-Österreich, by Friedrich Kaiser

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 19.
Folder 691
19-24 June 1880

* Eine Nacht in Berlin, by Albert Hopf
Also advertised:
* Blinde Kuh, by Rudolf Kneisel

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 27 (three copies).
Folder 691
25 July 1880

* Licht, mehr Licht! oder: Die Tochter der Hölle [=Die Tochter Belial's], by Rudolf Kneisel

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 30.
Folder 691
15 August 1880

* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 50 (four copies).
Folder 691
9-11 October 1880

* Der Budiker und sein Kind, by Hermann Salingré and Eduard Jacobson
Also advertised:
* Faust, by Johann Wolgang von Goethe
* Quecksilber [by Leon Treptow]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 60 (three copies).
Folder 692
2-4 November 1880

* Citronen (Lemons), by Julius Rosen
Also advertised:
* Durchgegangene Weiber, by Alois Berla

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 68 (two copies).
Folder 692
20-25 November 1880

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and David Kalisch, with music by August Conradi
Also advertised:
* Der Löwe des Tages [presumably the play by Heinrich Wilken, with music by Carl Millöcker]
* Der Sohn auf Reisen [presumably the play by Leopold Feldmann]
* Lumpacivagabundus [=Der böse Geist Lumpazivavagabundus, by Johann Nestroy]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 71 (two copies).
Folder 692
27 November - 2 December 1880

* Aschenbrödel, oder: Der gläserne Pantoffel, by C. A. Görner
Also advertised:
* Unter dem Gaslicht (Under the Gaslight), by Wolff [presumably a German adaptation of the American play Under the Gaslight, by Augustin Daly]
* Die Fremden, oder: Der Heimathschein, by Roderich Benedix

Germania Theater, Die Bühne 1880, no. 76 (four copies).
Folder 692
9-15 December 1880

* Onkel Tom's Hütte [=Onkel Tom], by Therese von Megerle, based on the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Also advertised:
* Die Spitzenkönigin, by Hugo Müller [and Adolph L'Arronge]
* Narciss, by Albert Emil Brachvogel

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 4 (two copies).
Folder 693
8-13 January 1881

* Berliner Kinder, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
Also advertised:
* Die zweite Frau, by Blumenreich [possibly: Paul Blumenreich]
* Christ und Jude [possibly the play of this title by Adolph Reich; the title is also the same as that of the first part of Arthur Müller's Die Hexe von Leonberg]
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Die beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno
* Blitzmädel [by Carl Costa]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 12.
Folder 693
29 January - 3 February 1881

* Robert und Bertram, by Gustav Räder
Also advertised:
* Die Dame mit den Camelien (Camille) [by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias by Alexandre Dumas (fils)]
* Die Reise durch Philadelphia in 24 Stunden, by William Schoppe; described as a local farce written especially for Germania Theater
* Blitzmädel [by Carl Costa]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 13 (four copies).
Folder 693
3-5 February 1881

* Die Dame mit den Camelien [by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias by Alexandre Dumas (fils)]
Also advertised:
* Die Reise durch Philadelphia in 24 Stunden, by William Schoppe; described as a local farce written especially for Germania Theater

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 18 (two copies).
Folder 693
15-17 February 1881

* Die Dame mit den Camelien (Camille), [by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias] by Alexandre Dumas (fils)
Also advertised:
* Sarah Bernhardt, by Paul Löbel (the author was also an actor in the play, appearing from Concordia Theater, Baltimore)
* Heinrich Heine [=Junge Leiden], by A. Mels
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Verfehlter Beruf [by Emil Pohl]
* Die drei Junggesellen [by Roderich Benedix]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 25 (three copies).
Folder 694
3-7 March 1881

* Die Bettlerin von Marienberg [=Die Bettlerin], [by Julius Meissner, based on a play in French] by Michel Masson
Also advertised:
* Stadt und Land, oder: Der Viehhändler aus Oberösterreich, by Friedrich Kaiser

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 26 (two copies).
Folder 694
4-10 March 1881

* Stadt und land, oder: Der Viehhändler aus Oberösterreich, by Friedrich Kaiser
Also advertised:
* Hinko, oder: König und Freiknecht [presumably Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer's play Hinko, based on the novel Der Freiknecht by Ludwig Storch]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 31 (in purple) .
Folder 694
17-24 March 1881

* Cora, die Tochter des Pflanzers [=Cora, das Kind des Pflanzers], by Paul Victor Wichmann [based on the French play Cora, ou: L'esclavage, by Jules Barbier]
Also advertised:
* Ein geadelter Kaufmann [presumably the play by C. A. Görner]
* Der Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle [=Der Herr Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle], by Rudolf Kneisel

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 34.
Folder 694
24-28 March 1881

* Der Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle [=Der Herr Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle], by Rudolf Kneisel
Also advertised:
* Der Verschwender, by Nestroy [sic] [the author name is presumably an error; the play is a well known work by Ferdinand Raimund]
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Hamlet [by Shakespeare; translator unknown]
* Eine vornehme Ehe [most likely the play by Heinrich Laube, based on a French work by Octave Feuillet]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881, no. 40.
Folder 694
7-11 April 1881

* Die Schuld einer Frau, by Emil Neumann [based on the French play Le supplice d'une femme, by Alexandre Dumas (fils) in collaboration with Emile de Girardin]
* Das Lorle, oder: Ein Berliner im Schwarzwald, by August Wilhelm Hesse
Also advertised:
* Das Mädchen vom Dorfe, oder: Baron, Bauer und Handwerker [by Johann Krüger]

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881-1882, no. 20 (two copies).
Folder 694
3-7 November 1881

* Die Dame mit den Camelien,[by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias] by Alexandre Dumas (fils)
Also advertised:
* Der Jongleur, by Emil Pohl

Germania Theater, Die Bühne, 1881-1882, no. 79.
Folder 703
5-7 May 1882

* Emilia Galotti, by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
* Die Tochter der Hölle [=Die Tochter Belial's], by Rudolf Kneisel

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1882-83, no. 34.
Folder 695
weeking ending 3 March 1883

* Die beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1882-83, no. 44.
Folder 695
week ending 12 May 1883

* Unsere Frauen, by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1882-83, 8th week (two copies).
Folder 695
4-11 November 1883

* Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1882-83, 11th week.
Folder 695
25 November - 1 December 1883

* Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott, by Arthur Müller

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1882-83, 13th week (three copies).
Folder 695
9-15 December 1883

* Gaston, der Mann mit der eisernen Maske [=Die eiserne Maske], by L. Schneider based on the French play L'homme au masque de fer by Auguste Jean François Arnould and Narcisse Fournier
Also advertised:
* Bruder Liederlich, by Emil Pohl

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1882-83, 15th week (two copies).
Folder 695
23-29 December 1883

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1883-1884, 16th week (two copies).
Folder 695
30 December 1883 - 6 January 1884

* Die Pariser Bluthochzeit, oder: Die Schreckensherrschaft in der Bartholomäus Nacht [=Königin Margot und die Hugenotten], by Friedrich Adami based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père)

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1883-1884, 20th week (four copies).
Folder 695
27 January - 2 February 1884

* Eine Nacht in Berlin, oder: Onkel Bergemann, by Albert Hopf, with music by Adolf Lang

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1883-1884, vol. 3, 16th week.
Folder 704
29 November - 6 December 1884

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and David Kalisch, with music from August Conradi
Also advertised:
* Wilhelm Tell, by Friedrich Schiller

Germania Theater Zeitung, 29th week (two copies) .
Folder 704
4-12 April 1885

(a) - First of two different issues bearing the date 4-12 April 1885

* Die Afrikanerin, by Eduard Jacobson, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner

Germania Theater Zeitung, vol. 3, 29th week (two copies of the first page only) .
Folder 704
4-12 April 1885

(b) - Second of two different issues bearing the date 4-12 April 1885

* Berliner Kinder, oder: Was sich die Kaserne erzählt, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1885-1886.
Folder 704
week ending 24 October 1885

* Die Anna-Liese [=Die Anna-Lise], by Hermann Hersch
Also advertised:
* Die Anti-Xantippe, oder: Krieg den Frauen, by Rudolf Kneisel
* Das Stiftungsfest, by Gustav von Moser
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Der Registrator auf Reisen, by Adolph L'Arronge
* Die goldene Spinne, by Franz von Schönthan
* Der Salon-Tyroler, by Gustav von Moser
* Frau Director Striese (sequel to Der Raub der Sabinerinnen), by Franz and Paul von Schönthan
* Sidonie, oder: Fromont Jr. und Riesler Sr. [translation of the French play Fromont jeune et Risler aîné, by Alphonse Daudet and Adolphe Belot, an adaptation of the novel of the same title by Daudet]
* Der Schwabenstreich [by Franz von Schönthan]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1885-1886.
Folder 704
week ending 24 April 1886

* Die Tochter der Hölle [=Die Tochter Belial's], Rudolf Kneisel
Also advertised:
* Der Bibliothekar (The Private Secretary), by Gustav von Moser
* Harun al Raschid und seine Schwiegermutter, by Gustav von Moser
* Griseldis, das Köhlerkind [by Friedrich Halm]

Germania Theater Zeitung, no. 29.
Folder 704
weeking ending 18 December 1886

* Die Anna-Lise, by Hermann Hersch
Also advertised:
* Handwerk hat goldenen Boden[by Wilhelm Mannstädt]
* Der Stabstrompeter [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1886-1887, no. 37.
Folder 705
week ending 19 February 1887

* Maria und Magdalena, by Paul Lindau
Also advertised:
* Unsere Sclaven, by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch
* Die schöne Ungarin [by Wilhelm Mannstädt und A. Weller, with music by Gustav Steffens]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1886-1887, no. 39.
Folder 705
week ending 12 March 1887

* Robert und Bertram, by Gustav Räder
Also advertised:
* Ein berühmter Rechtsfall [translation of the French play Une cause célèbre, by Adolphe d'Ennery and Eugène Cormon]
* Romeo und Julie, by Shakespeare (title of original: Romeo and Juliet) [translator unknown]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1886-1887, no. 40.
Folder 705
week ending 19 March 1887

* Ein Tropfen Gift, by Oscar Blumenthal
Also advertised:
* Fedora [translation of the French play Fédora, by Victorien Sardou]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1886-1887, no. 43 (two copies).
Folder 705
week ending 30 April 1887

* Der Bucklige, oder: Die Macht der Arbeit, by C. A. Paul
Also advertised:
* Mensch ärgere dich nicht! [by Leon Treptow]; performance tentatively scheduled at the Thalia Theater

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-1888, no. 2.
Folder 705
week ending 24 September 1887

* Doctor Klaus, by Adolph L'Arronge Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Der Stabstrompeter [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]
* Die Sternschnuppe [by Gustav von Moser and Otto Girndt]
* Unser Doctor [by Leon Treptow and Louis Herrmann]
* Die große Unbekannte [by Rudolf Kneisel]
* Der deutsche Michel [by Louis Nötel]
* Kyritz-Pyritz, by Heinrich Wilken and Oskar Justinus

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-1888, no. 13 (two copies).
Folder 705
week ending 5 November 1887

* Gaston, der Mann mit der eisernen Maske [=Die eiserne Maske], by L. Schneider based on the French play L'homme au masque de fer by Auguste Jean François Arnould and Narcisse Fournier
Also advertised:
* Die beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Wilhelm Tell, by Friedrich Schiller

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-1888, no. 15.
Folder 705
week ending 12 November 1887

* Die Beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno
Also advertised:
* Kyritz-Pyritz, by Heinrich Wilken and Oskar Justinus
* Wilhelm Tell, by Friedrich Schiller
* Der Stabstrompeter [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-1888, no. 16 (two copies).
Folder 705
week ending 19 November 1887

* Berliner Kinder, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
Also advertised:
* Deborah, by S. H. Mosenthal
* Der Stabstrompeter [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]
* Wilhelm Tell, by Friedrich Schiller

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-1888, no. 18.
Folder 696
week ending 3 December 1887

* Reif-Reifling, by Gustav von Moser
Also advertised:
* Ehrliche Arbeit, by Heinrich Wilken
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Jane Eyre, die Waise von Lowood [by Heinrich Wilken, based on the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë]
* Der Wald-Teufel, by Wilhelm Mannstädt with music by Gustav Steffens
* Ihre Familie, by Julius Stinde and Georg Engels [based on stories by Stinde]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-88, no. 25.
Folder 706
week ending 21 January 1888

* Mein Leopold, by Adolph L'Arronge, with music by Rudolf Bial
Also advertised:
* Spottvögel, by Wilhelm Mannstädt, with music by Gustav Steffens
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Richard III [by Shakespeare; translator unknown]
* Der tolle Wenzel, by Wilhelm Mannstädt
* 200,000 [sic] Mark Belohnung [=20,000 Mark Belohnung, by Leon Treptow]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-88, no. 30.
Folder 706
week ending 25 February 1888

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and David Kalisch, with music by August Conradi
Also advertised:
* Der tolle Wenzel, by Wilhelm Mannstädt
* Der Pfarrer von Kirchfeld, by Ludwig Anzengruber
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* 20,000 Mark Belohnung [by Leon Treptow], with music by Paul Sentz
* Anna, zu Dir ist mein liebster Gang [by Julius Braun]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1887-88, no. 32.
Folder 696
week ending 10 March 1888

* Der Viehhändler aus Oberösterreich [=Stadt und Land], by Friedrich Kaiser
Also advertised:
* Die Regimentstochter [by Carl Blum]
* Die lustigen Weiber von Kyritz-Pyritz [=Kyritz-Pyritz], by Heinrich Wilken and Oskar Justinus
* Die Seemannsbraut, oder: Ihre Familie [=Ihre Familie by Julius Stinde and Georg Engels, based on stories by Stinde about the family Buchholz]
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* 20,000 Mark Belohnung [by Leon Treptow, with music by Paul Sentz]
* Der Trompeter von Säckingen [presumably the opera composed by Victor Ernst Nessler based, on the epic poem of the same title by Joseph Victor von Scheffel]
* Goldener Boden [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]

Germania Theater Zeitung, season 1888/1889 (two copies).
Folder 706
week ending 20 October 1888

* Unsere Frauen, by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan
Also advertised:
* Der Salon-Tyroler, by Gustav von Moser
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Othello, by Shakespeare [translator unknown]
Also advertised as "tentatively scheduled":
* Fiesco, oder: Die Verschwörung zu Genua, by Friedrich Schiller

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889 (three copies).
Folder 706
week ending 5 January 1889

* Onkel Bergemann's Abenteuer in der Residenz [=Eine Nacht in Berlin], by Albert Hopf, with music by Adolf Lang
Also advertised:
* Höhere Töchter, by Wilhelm Mannstädt
* Schmerle's Geheimniss, by Rudolf Kneisel
* Othello, der Mohr von Venedig [by Shakespeare; translator unknown]

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889 (three copies).
Folder 706
week ending 9 February 1889

(a) - The first of two different issues bearing the date 9 February 1889 (coming performances dated 4-9 February).

* Der Herr Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle, by Rudolf Kneisel
Also advertised:
* Der Veilchenfresser, by Gustav von Moser

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889.
Folder 706
week ending 9 February 1889

(b) - The second of two different issues bearing the date 9 February 1889 (coming performances dated 7-13 February).

* Der Veilchenfresser, by Gustav von Moser
Also advertised:
* Der Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle [=Der Herr Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle], by Rudolf Kneisel
* Der Heirath vor der Trommel, oder: Die beiden Regimentstöchter [possibly: Mariette und Jeanetton, oder: Die Heirath vor der Trommel, by W. Friedrich, based on a work in French by Alexandre Dumas (père)]
* Gewonnene Herzen, by Hugo Müller

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889 (two copies).
Folder 707
week ending 2 March 1889

(a) - The first of two different issues bearing the date 2 March 1889 (coming performances dated 25 February - 2 March).

* Robert und Bertram, by Gustav Räder
Also advertised:
* Preciosa, by Pius Alexander Wolff
* Schmerle's Geheimniss, by Rudolf Kneisel

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889 (two copies).
Folder 707
week ending 2 March 1889

(b) - The second of two different issues bearing the date 2 March 1889 (coming performances are dated 28 February - 6 March).

* Robert und Bertram, by Gustav Räder
Also advertised:
* Schmerle's Geheimniss, by Rudolf Kneisel
* Unter der Erde, oder: Arbeit bringt Segen, by Carl Elmar
* Cora, die Tochter des Pflanzers [=Cora, das Kind des Pflanzers], by Paul Victor Wichmann [based on the French play Cora, ou: L'esclavage, by Jules Barbier]

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889.
Folder 707
week ending 9 March 1889

(a) - The first of two different issues of the newspaper bearing the date 9 March 1889.

* Robert und Bertram, by Gustav Räder
Also advertised:
* Gewonnene Herzen, by Hugo Müller
* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré
* Der weiße Rabe, oder: Ein ehrlicher Makler, by Leon Treptow

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889 (three copies).
Folder 707
week ending 9 March 1889

(b) - The second of two different issues bearing the date 9 March 1889.

* Cora, die Tochter des Pflanzers [=Cora, das Kind des Pflanzers], by Paul Victor Wichmann [based on the French play Cora, ou: L'esclavage, by Jules Barbier]
Also advertised:
* Robert und Bertram, oder: Die lustigen Vagabunden, by Gustav Räder
* Gewonnene Herzen, by Hugo Müller
* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré
* Der weiße Rabe, oder: Ein ehrlicher Makler, by Leon Treptow

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1888/1889 (three copies).
Folder 707
week ending 16 March 1889

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Adolf Lang
Also advertised:
* Der weiße Rabe, oder: Ein ehrlicher Makler, by Leon Treptow
* Kabale und Liebe, by Friedrich Schiller
Also advertised as "tentatively scheduled":
* Eine moderne Ehe [author unknown]
* Die Grille, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer [based on the story "Le grillon" by George Sand]

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1889/1890 (two copies).
Folder 697
week ending 8 March 1890

* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, oder: Der alte Dessauer und sein Fähnrich, by Arthur Müller
Also advertised:
* Die Lachtaube [by Eduard Jacobson]
* Die zärtlichen Verwandten, by Roderich Benedix
* Die Braut von Messina, oder: Die feindlichen Brüder, by Friedrich Schiller
* Die wilde Jagd [by Ludwig Fulda]
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Großstädtisch, by J. B. von Schweitzer

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1889/1890.
Folder 707
week ending 22 March 1890

* Großstädtisch, by J. B. von Schweitzer
Also advertised:
* Die relegierten Studenten, by Roderich Benedix
* Leuchtkugeln [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]
* Ein geadelter Kaufmann [presumably the play by C. A. Görner]
* Die zärtlichen Verwandten, by Roderich Benedix
* Die große Glocke, by Oscar Blumenthal
* Die Lachtaube [by Eduard Jacobson]
* Philippine Welser [possibly the play by Oskar von Redwitz]

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1889/1890 (three copies).
Folder 707
week ending 12 April 1890

* Der Raub der Sabinerinnen, by Franz and Paul von Schönthan
* Die Dame mit den Camelien (Camille), [by L. von Alvensleben, based on the French novel La dame aux camélias] by Alexandre Dumas (fils)
Also advertised:
* Die Spitzenkönigin [by Hugo Müller and Adolph L'Arronge]
* Unser Otto [by Wilhelm Mannstädt]
* Die Ehre, by Hermann Sudermann

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1889/1890 (three copies).
Folder 697
week ending 4 October 1890

* Therese Krones, by Carl Haffner, with music by Adolf Müller
Also advertised:
* Sein Steckenpferd, by Leon Treptow

Germania Theater Zeitung, 1889/1890.
Folder 708
week ending 20 December 1890

* Ein Tropfen Gift, by Oscar Blumenthal
Also advertised:
* Daniela, by Felix Philippi
* Goldene Berge [by Heinrich Wilken and Eduard Jacobson]
* Ferreol [translation by R. Schelcher of the French play Andrea Férreol, by Victorien Sardou]
* Engelmann's Rache [presumably the play by W. Büller and O. Voges]
* Halbe Dichter [presumably the play by Julius Rosen]
Also advertised as "tentatively scheduled":
* Der Weltumsegler wider Willen, by Gustav Räder
* Verfehlter Beruf [by Emil Pohl]
* Die Schule des Lebens, oder: Die Königstochter als Bettlerin [by Ernst Raupach]

Germania Theater, 1890/1891 .
Folder 698
week ending 21 February 1891

* Die beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno
Also advertised:
* Der Rattenfänger von Hameln [by Braun]
* Böse Zungen, by Heinrich Laube
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Die Haubenlerche, by Ernst von Wildenbruch
* Sodom's Ende, by Hermann Sudermann
* Der Schatten, by Paul Lindau
* Flotte Weiber [by Leon Treptow]

Germania Theater, 1890/1891.
Folder 708
week ending 11 April 1891

* Die Tochter der Hölle, oder: Mensch bezahle deine Schulden [=Die Tochter Belial's], by Rudolf Kneisel
Also advertised:
* Comtesse Helene [by J. B. Schweitzer and Hermann Salingré, with music by Rudolf Bial]
* Krieg im Frieden, by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan
* Die Leibrente, by Gustav von Moser
* Sodom's Ende, by Hermann Sudermann

Germania Theater, 1890/1891.
Folder 708
week ending 25 April 1891

* Sodom's Ende, by Hermann Sudermann
* Heine's junge Leiden [=Junge Leiden], by A. Mels
Also advertised:
* Nemesis, oder: Eine Civil-Ehe [by Adolph Reich]

Germania Theater, 1891/1892.
Folder 698
week ending 10 October 1891

* Er muß auf's Land, by W. Friedrich
* Wenn man im Dunkeln küßt, by Carl Mallachow and Oskar Elsner
Also advertised:
* Die Maurer von Berlin, by Emil Pohl [with music by Rudolf Bial]

Germania Theater (half-page fragment).
Folder 698
[circa week ending 17 October 1891]

* Wenn man im Dunkeln küßt, by Carl Mallachow and Oskar Elsner
Also advertised:
* Die Maurer von Berlin, by Emil Pohl [with music by Rudolf Bial]
* Die beiden Balletmädchen, oder: Ihre Familie [=Ihre Familie], by Julius Stinde and Georg Engels [based on stories by Stinde about the family Buchholz]
* Gräfin Lea, by Paul Lindau

Germania Theater, 1891/1892 (two copies and an extra second page).
Folder 708
week ending 7 November 1891

(a) - The first of two different issues bearing the date 7 November 1891 (coming performances dated 2-7 November).

* Einer von unsere Leut', by David Kalisch and O. F. Berg
* Unsere Frauen, by Gustav von Moser and Franz von Schönthan
Also advertised:
* Der Raub der Sabinerinnen, by Franz and Paul von Schönthan
* Der rechte Schlüssel, by Francis Stahl

Germania Theater, 1891/1892 (includes two copies of variant second page).
Folder 708
week ending 7 November 1891

(b) - The second of two different issues bearing the date 7 November 1891 (coming performances dated 9-14 November).

* Der rechte Schlüssel, by Francis Stahl
* Die Maurer von Berlin, by Emil Pohl, with music by Rudolf Bial.
Also advertised:
* Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua, by Friedrich Schiller
* Eine leichte Person, by Anton Bittner

Germania Theater, 1891/1892 (two copies).
Folder 708
week ending 28 November 1891

* Ein delikater Auftrag [=Ein sehr delikater Auftrag], by Eduard Bloch
* Das Schwert des Damokles, by Gustav Heinrich Gans von und zu Putlitz
* Der bengalische Tiger, by Otto Randolf [based on the French Un tigre du Bengale by Édouard Brisebarre and M. Marc-Michel]
* Berliner Kinder, by Hermann Salingré, with music by Thuiskon Hauptner
Also advertised:
* Der schwarze Schleier [presumably the play by Oscar Blumenthal]
* Das Mädel vom Dorf [=Das Mädchen vom Dorfe, by Johann Krüger]
* Der Goldbauer [presumably the play by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer]
* Entspector Bräsig [=Inspektor Bräsig] [most likely the adaptation by Theodor Gassmann and Johann Krüger of the Low-German novel Ut mine stomtid by Fritz Reuter]

Germania Theater, 1891/1892.
Folder 709
week ending 6 February 1892

* Narciss, by Albert Emil Brachvogel
* Die Räuber, by Friedrich Schiller
Also advertised:
* Hamlet [by Shakespeare; translator unknown]
* Trotzköpfchen [by Oscar Blumenthal]
* Der Hüttenbesitzer [most likely a translation/adaptation of the French novel and play Le maître de forges by Georges Ohnet]

Germania Theater, 1891/1892 (two copies).
Folder 709
week ending 27 February 1892

* Die Verschwörung der Frauen, by Arthur Müller
Also advertised:
* Drei Paar Schuhe [presumably the play by Karl Görlitz, with music by Carl Millöcker]
* Die Salon-Tyrolerin, by Gustav von Moser
* Pension Schöller, by Carl Laufs

Germania Theater, 1891/1892.
Folder 709
week ending 12 March 1892

* Maria und Magdalena, by Paul Lindau
Also advertised:
* 's Lorle [author unknown: possibly Das Lorle, by August Wilhelm Hesse, or Dorf und Stadt, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer]
* Wohlthätige Frauen [by Adolph L'Arronge]
* Die Schuld einer Frau [by Emil Neumann, based on the French play Le supplice d'une femme, by Alexandre Dumas (fils) in collaboration with Emile de Girardin]
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Nora, Nora, by Henrik Ibsen (title of the Norwegian original: Et Dukkehjem; English: A Doll's House) [translator unknown]

Germania Theater, 1891/1892.
Folder 698
week ending 16 April 1892

* Die Nixe, by Friedrich Gustav Triesch
* Der Ehemann vor der Thür, by Victorien Sardou
[title of the original French play: La Papillonne; translator unknown – possibly August Förster, whose translation of that work was published as Flattersucht]
* Die schöne Galathée [operetta composed by Franz von Suppé, presumably with libretto by Poly Henrion]
* Die Tochter der Hölle [=Die Tochter Belial's], by Rudolf Kneisel
Also advertised:
* Unsere Don Juans, by Leon Treptow
* Flotte Weiber [by Leon Treptow]
* Papageno [presumably the play by Rudolf Kneisel]

Germania Theater [1891/1892] (fragment, second page only).
Folder 698
[circa April-May 1892]

* Die schöne Galathée, operetta composed by Franz von Suppé [presumably with libretto by Poly Henrion]
* Mein neuer Hut [by Max Bernstein]
* Die Verlobung bei der Laterne, operetta by Jacques Offenbach [original French libretto, Le mariage aux lanternes, by Michel Carré und Léon Battu; translator unknown]

Germania Theater, [1892/1893] no. 1 .
Folder 709
week beginning 21 September 1892

* Schuldig! by Richard Voss
* Der Bibliothekar (Private Secretary), by Gustav von Moser
Also advertised:
* Mein Herzensfritz, by Wilhelm Mannstädt and Heinrich Wilken

Germania Theater, [1892/1893] no. 9.
Folder 698
week beginning 24 October 1892

* Der Wald-Teufel, by Wilhelm Mannstädt, with music by Gustav Steffens
* Die beiden Reichenmüller, by Anton Anno
Also advertised:
* Der Störenfried, by Roderich Benedix
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Die Quizows [presumably: Die Quitzows, by Ernst von Wildenbruch]
* Der Dorfbarbier [by Paul Weidmann and Joseph Weidmann, with music by Johann Schenk]
* Der Soldatenfreund [author unknown]
* Satisfaktion [possibly the play by Alexander Baron von Roberts]
* Orpheus in der Unterwelt [presumably the opera composed by Jacques Offenbach, with German libretto by Ludwig Kalisch, based on the original French libretto Orphée aux enfers, by Hector Jonathan Crémieux

Germania Theater, [1892/1893] no. 28.
Folder 698
week beginning 1 February 1893

* Schützen-Lies'l, by Leon Treptow, with music by Gustav Steffens
* Die Waise aus Lowood, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer, based on the novel Jane Eyre by Currer Bell [pseudonym of Charlotte Brontë]
* Die Anna-Liese [=Die Anna-Lise], by Hermann Hersch

Germania Theater, [1892/1893] no. 37 (two copies).
Folder 709
week beginning 3 April 1893

* Gewonnene Herzen, by Hugo Müller, with music by Rudolf Bial
* Philippine Welser, by Oskar von Redwitz
* Eine Nacht in der Residenz [=Eine Nacht in Berlin], by Albert Hopf, with music by Adolf Lang
* Die Waise aus Lowood, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer, based on the novel Jane Eyre by Currer Bell [pseudonym of Charlotte Brontë]
* Deborah, by S. H. Mosenthal
Also advertised:
* Die Karls-Schüler [=Die Karlsschüler, by Heinrich Laube]

Germania Theater, [1893/1894] no. 14 (two copies and one incomplete version, sides two and three only).
Folder 710
week beginning 11 January 1894

* Stadt-Wahlen, oder: Roderich Heller [=Roderich Heller], by Franz von Schönthan
* Robert und Bertram, oder: Die lustigen Vagabunden, by Gustav Räder
* Luftschlösser, by Wilhelm Mannstädt and A. Weller, with music by [Adolf?] Mohr
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Der Geigenmacher von Mittenwald [presumably the play by Ludwig Ganghofer and Hans Neuert]
* Der Hüttenbesitzer [most likely a translation/adaptation of the French novel and play Le maître de forges by Georges Ohnet]

Germania Theater, [1893/1894] no. 15.
Folder 710
week beginning 18 January 1894

* Lorbeerbaum und Bettelstab, oder: Drei Winter eines deutschen Dichters, by Karl von Holtei
* Luftschlösser, by Wilhelm Mannstädt and A. Weller, with music by [Adolf?] Mohr
* Der Viehhändler aus Ober-Österreich [=Stadt und Land], by Friedrich Kaiser
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame, by Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer based on the French novel Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* Geigenmacher von Mittenwald [presumably the play by Ludwig Ganghofer and Hans Neuert]
* Der Hüttenbesitzer [most likely a translation/adaptation of the French novel and play Le maître de forges by Georges Ohnet]
* Dolores [author unknown]

Germania Theatre, [1894/1895] no. 7.
Folder 710
week beginning 8 November 1894

* Grünhörner (Greenhorns), by Hans Dobers (member of Germania Theater), with music by Max Gabriel
* Die Gustel von Blasewitz, by Sigmund Schlesinger
* Unter vier Augen, by Ludwig Fulda

Germania Theatre, [1894/1895] no. 9.
Folder 710
week beginning 22 November 1894

* Grünhörner (Greenhorns), by Hans Dobers (member of Germania Theater), with music by Max Gabriel
Also advertised as "in preparation":
* König Krause [presumably the play by Julius Keller and Louis Herrmann]

Germania Theatre, [1894/1895] no. 23.
Folder 710
week beginning 28 February 1895

* Die Ehre, by Hermann Sudermann
Also advertised:
* Die Räuber, by Friedrich Schiller
* Die Geheimnisse von Philadelphia [author unknown]

Harmonie Programme, season 1893-1894.
Folder 699
3 December 1893

* Wie man Landluft geniesst, by C. A. Görner

Harmonie Program, season 1897-1898.
Folder 699
26 December 1897 - 1 January 1898

* Im Wartesalon erster Klasse, by Hugo Müller
* Ein modernes Verhängniss, by Feodor von Wehl

Note

This newspaper is generally in English, with performance announcements and cast listings given in both English and German.

Programme, New Park Theatre, season 1890-1891, vol. II, no. 4.
Folder 700
6-11 October 1890

* Die Ehre, by Hermann Sudermann
* Der Fall Clemenceau, by Armand d'Artois and Alexandre Dumas (fils) [translation of the French play L'affaire Clémenceau by d'Artrois, based on the novel of the same title by Dumas; translator possibly: R. Schelcher]

Saenger-Halle, Belmont Avenue, newspaper.
Folder 701
17 November 1889

* Griseldis!, oder: Mannesstolz und Frauenliebe, by Friedrich Halm
* Die schöne Ungarin, by Wilhelm Mannstädt und A. Weller

Thalia Theater Programme, season 1885-86 .
Folder 711
week ending 12 December 1885

* Der Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle [=Der Herr Stadtmusikus und seine Kapelle], by Rudolf Kneisel

Thalia Theater Programme, season 1885-86 (two copies) .
Folder 711
week ending 6 March 1886

* Die Pariser Bluthochzeit [=Königin Margot und die Hugenotten], by Friedrich Adami based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père)

Thalia Theater Programme, season 1885-86 (two copies, in yellow and orange) .
Folder 711
week ending 20 March 1886

* Das Volk wie es weint und lacht, by O. F. Berg and Davild Kalisch, with music from August Conradi
Also advertised:
* Die Pariser Bluthochzeit [=Königin Margot und die Hugenotten], by Friedrich Adami based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père)
* Frisch, gesund und meschugge [by Adolph L'Arronge]

Thalia Theater Programme, season 1885-86 .
Folder 711
week ending 27 March 1886

(a) - The first of two different issues bearing the date 27 March 1886.

* Lucretia Borgia, by Alexander Preuss based on the French play Lucrèce Borgia by Victor Hugo
Also advertised:
* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré

Thalia Theater Programme, season 1885-86 (four copies of the first page only).
Folder 711
week ending 27 March 1886

(b) - The second of two different issues bearing the date 27 March 1886.

* Pech-Schulze, by Hermann Salingré, with music by August Conradi.
Note: The printed edition of the play indicates that the accompanying music is by A. Lang, not by Conradi.

Die Bühne. Turner Halle Theatre-Programm.
Folder 702
22-27 May 1881

* Doctor Klaus, by Adolph L'Arronge; performance in Männerchor-Halle
* Die schöne Müllerin, by L. Schneider; performance in Turner-Halle
* Der Bombardier im Feuer, by Sauer; performance in Turner Halle
Also advertised:
* Der schwarze Peter, by C. A. Görner; performance in Dramatic Hall
* Eine Parthie 66, oder: Wem gehört die Frau, by W. Friedrich; performance in Dramatic Hall, Thalia Theater-Club
* Eine verfolgte Unschuld, by Emil Pohl and Lange, with music by August Conradi.
Note: Printed editions of the latter play give Pohl as the sole author.

Arrangement and Description

This index is arranged alphabetically by author name, then by title of work. Playbills that carry announcements for performances of a given work are then listed chronologically, followed by theater newspapers related to that work, also listed chronologically. Playbills and theater newspapers pertain to Germania Theater, Philadelphia, unless otherwise specified. This index and the following two indices to the playbills and theater newspapers comprise three interrelated parts:

1. Alphabetical index by author of play, then by title

2. Alphabetical index by title of play, for plays of unidentified authorship

3. Alphabetical listing of composers of music for plays, with cross-reference to the author name under which the listing for the play can be found

In the case of works that are translations and/or adaptations, the author of the source work, if known, has been included in this index, with a cross-reference to the main entry under the name of the translator or adapter. If the name of the translator or adapter could not be determined, and only the name of the author of the source work is known, then the author of the source work has been used for the main entry for the German play, with a note about the original work from which the play was translated.

Please keep in mind that not all works represented in the collection are included in this manual index but only the ones mentioned in the playbills and newspapers. For works that are represented solely by theater rehearsal materials (Series I) or by librettos (Series II), the catalog records that have been created for those files in Franklin, the library's catalog, are accessible both by author or composer name and by title of the work to be performed.

Note

The symbol [R] following the title of a play indicates that the Learned Collection also contains theater rehearsal materials for that play, in Series I.

Adami, Friedrich: Königin Margot und die Hugenotten[R].
Sometimes performed under the title Die Pariser Bluthochzeit; based on the French novel La reine Margot by Alexandre Dumas (père).
Folder --
* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten: playbill, Stadt-Theater, 14 January 1877.
Folder 686
* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten: playbill, 31 March - 1 April 1878.
Folder 677
* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten: playbill (oversized), 1 January [1884].
Folder 720
* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten: newspaper, 30 December 1883 - 6 January 1884, season 1883-1884, 16th week.
Folder 695
* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten: newspaper, Thalia Theater, 6 March 1886.
Folder 711
* Königin Margot und die Hugenotten: newspaper, Thalia Theater, 20 March 1886.
Folder 711
Albini (pseudonym)--see under: Meddlhammer, Albin von.
Folder --
Alvensleben, L. von (Ludwig): Die Dame mit den Camelien [R].
Based on the novel La dame aux camélias by Alexandre Dumas (fils).
Folder --
* Die Dame mit den Camelien: playbill (oversized), 3-7 November 1881.
Folder 720
* Die Dame mit den Camelien: playbill (oversized), 11-15 April 1890.
Folder 724
* Die Dame mit den Camelien: newspaper, 1881, no. 12, 29 January - 3 February.
Folder 693
* Die Dame mit den Camelien: newspaper, 1881, no. 13, 3-5 February.
Folder 693
* Die Dame mit den Camelien: newspaper, 1881, no. 18, 15-17 February.
Folder 693
* Die Dame mit den Camelien: newspaper, season 1881-1882, no. 20, 3-7 November 1881.
Folder 694
Anno, Anton: Die beiden Reichenmüller [R].
Folder --
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: playbill, 5 October [1884], with music by G. Bätz.
Folder 681
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: newspaper, 8-13 January 1881, no. 4.
Folder 693
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: newspaper, 3 March 1883, season 1882-1883, no. 34.
Folder 695
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: newspaper, 5 November 1887, season 1887-1888, no. 13.
Folder 705
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: newspaper, 12 November 1887, season 1887-1888, no. 15.
Folder 705
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: newspaper, 21 February 1891.
Folder 698
* Die beiden Reichenmüller: newspaper, 24 October 1892, no. 9.
Folder 698
Anzengruber, Ludwig: Der Pfarrer von Kirchfeld [R].
Folder --
* Der Pfarrer von Kirchfeld: newspaper, 25 February 1888, season 1887-1888, no. 30.
Folder 706
Arago, Etienne: Les mémoires du diable--see: Schneider, L. (Louis), Die Memoiren des Teufels.
Folder --
Arnould, M. (Auguste Jean François): L'homme au masque de fer--see: Schneider, L. (Louis), Die eiserne Maske.
Folder --
Arter, Emil (pseudonym for M. A. Reitler): Pikante Enthüllungen.
Folder --
* Pikante Enthüllungen: playbill (oversized), 3-7 November 1881.
Folder 720
Artois, Armand d' : Der Fall Clemenceau.
German translation (possibly: R. Schelcher) of D'Artois's play L'affaire Clemenceau, based on the novel of the same title by Alexandre Dumas (fils).
Folder --
* Der Fall Clemenceau: newspaper, New Park Theatre, season 1890-1891, vol. II, no. 4.
Folder 700
Auerbach, Berthold, Dorfgeschichten (stories)--see: Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte, Dorf und Stadt.
Folder --
Barbier, Jules: Cora, ou: L'esclavage--see: Wichmann, Paul Victor von Sebog und Glenz, Cora, das Kind des Planzers.
Folder --
Battu, Léon: Le mariage aux lanternes--see under: Carré, Michel.
Folder --
Bauermeister, M.: Eine silberne Hochzeit, oder: Das Jubel-Paar .
Folder --
* Eine silberne Hochzeit, oder: Das Jubel-Paar: newspaper, 11 October 1878, vol. 1, no. 26.
Folder 703
Belot, Adolphe: Fromont jeune et Risler aîné--see under: Daudet, Alphonse .
Folder --
Benedix, Roderich: Die alte Jungfer [R].
Folder --
* Die alte Jungfer: playbill, 6-10 March [1886].
Folder 682
Benedix, Roderich: Die drei Junggesellen.
Folder --
* Die drei Junggesellen: newspaper, 1881, no. 18, 15-17 February.
Folder 693
Benedix, Roderich: Die Fremden.
Folder --
* Die Fremden: newspaper, 1880, no. 71, 27 November - 2 December.
Folder 692
Benedix, Roderich: Mathilde, ein Weib wie es sein soll.
Folder --
* Mathilde, ein Weib wie es sein soll: newspaper, 14 March 1879, vol. 1, no. 48.
Folder 690
Benedix, Roderich: Die relegierten Studenten.
Folder --
* Die relegierten Studenten: newspaper, 22 March 1890.
Folder 707
Benedix, Roderich: Der Störenfried.
Folder --
* Der Störenfried: newspaper, 24 October 1892, no. 9.
Folder 698
Benedix, Roderich: Die zärtlichen Verwandten.
Folder --
* Die zärtlichen Verwandten: newspaper, 8 March 1890.
Folder 697
* Die zärtlichen Verwandten: newspaper, 22 March 1890.
Folder 707
Berg, O. F. (pseudonym of Ottokar Franz Ebersberg): Die alte Schachtel--see: Pohl, Emil, Die alte Schachtel.
Folder --
Berg, O. F. (pseudonym of Ottokar Franz Ebersberg): Einer von unsere Leut'--see under: Kalisch, David.
Folder --
Berg, O. F. (pseudonym of Ottokar Franz Ebersberg): Lockere Zeisige!.
Co-authored by Eduard Jacobson.
Folder --
* Lockere Zeisige!: newspaper, 28 June 1878, vol. 1, no. 11 .
Folder 690
Berg, O. F. (pseudonym of Ottokar Franz Ebersberg): Das Volk wie es weint und lockt [R].
Co-authored by David Kalisch, with music by August Conradi.
Folder --
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: playbill, 30 November [1884].
Folder 681
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: playbill (oversized), 10-15 February [1888].
Folder 721
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: playbill, Thalia Theater, 17 March 1886.
Folder 687
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: newspaper, 1880, no. 68, 20-25 November.
Folder 692
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: newspaper, 29 November - 6 December 1884, vol. 3, 11th week.
Folder 704
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: newspaper, 25 February 1888, season 1887-1888, no. 30.
Folder 706
* Das Volk wie es weint und lockt: newspaper, Thalia Theater, 20 March 1886 .
Folder 711
Berla, Alois: Durchgegangene Weiber .
Folder --
* Durchgegangene Weiber: newspaper, 1880, no. 60, 2-4 November.
Folder 692
Bernstein, Max: Mein neuer Hut .
Folder --
* Mein neuer Hut: newspaper, circa April-May 1892.
Folder 698
Biedermann: Ihrer Majestät Schiff Pinafore.
Translation of H. M. S. Pinafore by W.S. Gilbert, with music by Arthur Sullivan. .
Folder --
* Ihrer Majestät Schiff Pinafore: newspaper, 14 March 1879, vol. 1, no. 48.
Folder 690
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Dorf und Stadt.
Based on the Dorfgeschichten of Berthold Auerbach.
Folder --
* Dorf und Stadt: newspaper, 15 November 1878, vol. 1, no. 31.
Folder 690
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Der Glöckner von Notre Dame [R].
Based on Victor Hugo's novel Notre-Dame de Paris.
Folder --
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame: playbill, 13-17 December [1879].
Folder 678
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame: playbill, Thalia Theater, [circa 1886].
Folder 687
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame: newspaper, 26 April 1878, vol. 1, no. 2.
Folder 690
* Der Glöckner von Notre Dame: newspaper, 18 January 1894, no. 15.
Folder 710
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Der Goldbauer .
Folder --
* Der Goldbauer: newspaper, 28 November 1891.
Folder 708
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Die Grille.
Based George Sand's story "Le grillon".
Folder --
* Die Grille: newspaper, 16 March 1889.
Folder 707
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Hinko.
Based on the novel Der Freiknecht by Ludwig Storch.
Folder --
* Hinko: newspaper, 1881, no. 26, 4-10 March.
Folder 694
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Schloß Greiffenstein, oder: Der Sammtschuh.
Folder --
* Schloß Greiffenstein, oder: Der Sammtschuh: newspaper 14 June 1878, vol. 1, no. 9.
Folder 703
Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte: Die Waise aus Lowood.
Based on the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (published under the pseudonym Currer Bell) .
Folder --
* Die Waise aus Lowood: newspaper, 1 February 1893, no. 28.
Folder 698
* Die Waise aus Lowood: newspaper, 3 April 1893, no. 37.
Folder 709
Bittner, Anton: Eine leichte Person .
Folder --
* Eine leichte Person: newspaper, 7 November 1891 (b).
Folder 708
Bloch, Eduard: Ein sehr delikater Auftrag [R].
Based on the French play Chez une petite dame [author of the original French play unknown] .
Folder --
* Ein sehr delikater Auftrag: playbill, 28 March 1886, Maennerchor Hall.
Folder 686
* Ein sehr delikater Auftrag: newspaper, 28 November 1891.
Folder 708
Blum, Carl: Die Regimentstochter.
Folder --
* Die Regimentstochter: playbill (oversized), 10-15 February [1888].
Folder 721
* Die Regimentstochter: newspaper,10 March 1888, season 1887-1888, no. 32.
Folder 696
Blumenreich, [Paul?]: Die zweite Frau .
Folder --
* Die zweite Frau: newspaper, 1881, no. 4, 8-13 January.
Folder 693
Blumenthal, Oscar: Die große Glocke .
Folder --
* Die große Glocke: newspaper, 22 March 1890.
Folder 707
Blumenthal, Oscar: Der schwarze Schleier.
Folder --
* Der schwarze Schleier: newspaper, 28 November 1891.
Folder 708
Blumenthal, Oscar: Ein Tropfen Gift [R].
Folder --
* Ein Tropfen Gift: newspaper, 19 March 1887, season 1886-1887, no. 40.
Folder 705
* Ein Tropfen Gift: newspaper, 20 December 1890.
Folder 708
Blumenthal, Oscar: Trotzköpfchen.
Folder --
* Trotzköpfchen: newspaper, 6 February 1892.
Folder 709
Brachvogel, Albert Emil: Narciss.
Folder --
* Narciss : newspaper, 1880, no. 76, 9-15 December.
Folder 692
* Narciss : newspaper, 6 February 1892.
Folder 709
Braun: Der Rattenfänger von Hameln .
Folder --
* Der Rattenfänger von Hameln: newspaper, 21 February 1891.
Folder 698
Braun, Julius: Anna, zu Dir ist mein liebster Gang .
Folder --
* Anna, zu Dir ist mein liebster Gang: newspaper, 25 February 1888, season 1887-1888, no. 30.
Folder 706
Brisebarre, Edouard: Un tigre du Bengale--see: Randolf, Otto, Der bengalische Tiger .
Folder --
Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre (novel)--see: Birch-Pfeiffer, Charlotte, Die Waise aus Lowood; and: Wilken, Heinrich, Die Waise von Lowood .
Folder --
Büller, W.: Engelmann's Rache.
Co-authored by O. Voges .
Folder --
* Engelmann's Rache: newspaper, 20 December 1890.
Folder 708
Carré, Michel: Die Verlobung bei der Laterne [R].
German translation of Le mariage aux lanternes (translator unknown) .
Folder --
* Die Verlobung bei der Laterne: newspaper, circa April-May 1892.
Folder 698
Cormon, Eugène: Une cause célèbre--see under: Ennery, Adolphe d' .
Folder --
Cormon, Eugène: Les deux orphelines--see under: Ennery, Adolphe d'.
Folder --
Costa, Carl [pseudonym of Karl Kostia]: Blitzmädel .
Folder --
* Blitzmädel: newspaper, 1881, no. 4, 8-13 January.
Folder 693
* Blitzmädel: newspaper, 1881, no. 12, 29 January - 3 February.
Folder 693
Crémieux, Hector Jonathan: Orphée aux enfers--see: Kalisch, Ludwig, Orpheus in der Unterwelt .
Folder --
Daly, Augustin: Under the Gaslight--see: Wolff, Unter dem Gaslicht.
Folder --
Daudet, Alphonse: Sidonie, oder: Fromont Jr. und Riesler Sr.
German translation (translator unknown) of Fromont jeune et Risler aîné, an adaptation of Daudet's novel of the same title, co-authored by Daudet and Adolphe Belot.
Folder --
* Sidonie, oder: Fromont Jr. und Riesler Sr.: newspaper, 24 October 1885.
Folder 704
Dobers, Hans (member of Germania Theater, Philadelphia): Grünhörner .
Folder --
* Grünhörner: newspaper, 8 November 1894, no. 7 .
Folder 710
* Grünhörner: newspaper, 22 November 1894, no. 9.
Folder 710
Dumas, Alexandre (père): La reine Margot (novel)--see: Adami, Friedrich, Königin Margot und die Hugenotten; see also: Friedrich, W., Mariette und Jeanetton, oder: Die Heirath vor der Trommel (adaptation of an unidentified work by Dumas) .
Folder --
Dumas, Alexandre (fils): L'affaire Clémenceau (novel)--see under: Artois, Armand d'.
Folder --
Dumas, Alexandre (fils): La dame aux camélias (novel)--see: Alvensleben, L. von (Ludwig), Die Dame mit den Camelien.
Folder --
Dumas, Alexandre (fils): Le supplice d'une femme--see: Neumann, Emil, Die Schuld einer Frau.
Folder --
Ebersberg, Ottokar Franz--see under pseudonym: Berg, O. F.
Folder --
Elmar, Carl: Ein jüdischer Dienstbote [R] .
Folder --
* Ein jüdischer Dienstbote: playbill, 27-28 April [1880].
Folder 679
* Ein jüdischer Dienstbote: newspaper, 29 November 1878, vol. 1, no. 33.
Folder 703
Elmar, Carl: Unter der Erde, oder: Arbeit bringt Segen.
Folder --
* Unter der Erde, oder: Arbeit bringt Segen: playbill (oversized), 4-9 March [1889].
Folder 723
* Unter der Erde, oder: Arbeit bringt Segen: newspaper, 2 March 1889 (b).
Folder 707
Elsner, Oskar: Die Wacht am Rhein [R] .
Folder --
* Die Wacht am Rhein: playbill, 14 March 1878.
Folder 677
Elsner, Oskar: Wenn man im Dunkeln küßt--see under: Mallachow, Carl.
Folder --
Engels, Georg: Ihre Familie--see under: Stinde, Julius .
Folder --
Ennery, Adolph d': Ein berühmter Rechtsfall
German translation of d'Ennery's Une cause célèbre, co-authored by Eugène Cormon (translator unknown) .
Folder --
* Ein berühmter Rechtsfall: newspaper, 12 March 1887, season 1886-1887, no. 39.
Folder 705
Ennery, Adolph d': Die beiden Waisen.
German translation of d'Ennery's Les deux orphelines, co-authored by Eugène Cormon, based on a novel of the same title by d'Ennery (translator unknown).
Folder --
* Die beiden Waisen: newspaper, 5 July 1878, vol. 1, no. 12.
Folder 690
Feuillet, Octave: Le mariage dans le monde--see: Laube, Heinrich, Eine vornehme Ehe.
Folder --
Feldmann, Leopold: Der Sohn auf Reisen .
Folder --
* Der Sohn auf Reisen: newspaper, 1880, no. 68, 20-25 November.
Folder 692
Fournier, N. (Narcisse): L'homme au masque de fer--see: Schneider, L. (Louis), Die eiserne Maske .
Folder --
Friedrich, W.: Er muß auf's Land .
Folder --
* Er muß auf's Land: newspaper, 10 October 1891.
Folder 698
Friedrich, W.: Mariette und Jeanetton, oder: Die Heirath vor der Trommel.
Based on an unidentified work by Alexandre Dumas (père).
Folder --
* Mariette und Jeanetton, oder: Die Heirath vor der Trommel: playbill, 27 November 1879.
Folder 678
* Mariette und Jeanetton, oder: Die Heirath vor der Trommel: newspaper, 9 February 1889 (b).
Folder 706
Friedrich, W.: Eine Parthie 66, oder: Wem gehört die Frau.
Folder --
* Eine Parthie 66, oder: Wem gehört die Frau: newspaper, Turner Halle, 22-27 May 1881.
Folder 702
Fulda, Ludwig: Unter vier Augen .
Folder --
* Unter vier Augen: newspaper, 8 November 1894, no. 7.
Folder 710
Fulda, Ludwig: Die wilde Jagd.
Folder --
* Die wilde Jagd: newspaper, 8 March 1890.
Folder 697
Ganghofer, Ludwig: Der Geigenmacher von Mittenwald.
Co-authored by Hans Neuert. .
Folder --
* Der Geigenmacher von Mittenwald: newspaper, 11 January 1894, no. 14.
Folder 710
* Der Geigenmacher von Mittenwald: newspaper, 18 January 1894, no. 15.
Folder 710
Gassmann, Theodor: Inspektor Bräsig.
Co-authored by J. Krüger; dramatic adaptation of the Low-German novel Ut mine stomtid by Fritz Reuter .
Folder --
* Inspektor Bräsig: newspaper, 28 November 1891.
Folder 708
Gassmann, Theodor: Die Rose von Bacharach.
Folder --
* Die Rose von Bacharach: newspaper, 23 August 1878, vol. 1, no. 19.
Folder 690
Gilbert, W. S. (William Schwenck): H. M. S. Pinafore--see: Biedermann, Ihrer Majestät Schiff Pinafore, oder: Die Seemanns Braut .
Folder --
Girardin, Emil de: Le supplice d'une femme--see: Neumann, Emil, Die Schuld einer Frau .
Folder --
Girndt, Otto: Nervös--see under: Moser, Gustav von.
Folder --
Girndt, Otto: Die Sternschnuppe--see under: Moser, Gustav von.
Folder --
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von: Faust .
Folder --
* Faust: newspaper, 24 May 1878, vol. 1, no. 6.
Folder 703
* Faust: newspaper, 1880, no. 50, 9-11 October.
Folder 692
Görlitz, Karl: Drei paar Schuhe.
Folder --
* Drei paar Schuhe : newspaper, 27 February 1892.
Folder 709
Görner, C. A. (Carl August): Aschenbrödel, oder: Der gläserne Pantoffel [R].
Folder --
* Aschenbrödel, oder: Der gläserne Pantoffel : playbill, 27 November 1879.
Folder 678
* Aschenbrödel, oder: Der gläserne Pantoffel : newspaper, 25 October 1878, vol. 1, no. 28.
Folder 690
* Aschenbrödel, oder: Der gläserne Pantoffel : newspaper, 1880, no. 71, 27 November - 2 December.
Folder 692
Görner, C. A. (Carl August): Englisch.
Folder --
* Englisch: newspaper, 1880, no. 1, 16-22 March.
Folder 691
Görner, C. A. (Carl August): Ein geadelter Kaufmann.
Folder --
* Ein geadelter Kaufmann: newspaper, 1881, no. 31, 17-24 March.
Folder 694
* Ein geadelter Kaufmann: newspaper, 22 March 1890.
Folder 707
Görner, C. A. (Carl August): Der Rattenfänger von Hameln
Based on the history of the town of Hameln by Friedrich Sprenger and a chronical by Ehrick, with music by Ernst Catenhusen.
Folder --
* Der Rattenfänger von Hameln: playbill, 5-6 April [1885].
Folder 682
Görner, C. A. (Carl August): Der schwarze Peter.
Folder --
* Der schwarze Peter: newspaper, Turner Halle, 22-27 May 1881.
Folder 702
Görner, C. A. (Carl August): Wie man Landluft geniesst [R].
Folder --
* Wie man Landluft geniesst: playbill, "To-Night at the Bijou (Petersen's Hotel)," undated.
Folder 675
* Wie man Landluft geniesst: newspaper, Harmonie Hall, season 1893-1894.
Folder 699
Guinot, Eugène: Les mémoires du diable--see: Schneider, L. (Louis), Die Memoiren des Teufels.
Folder --
Gutzkow, Karl: Uriel Acosta.
Folder --
* Uriel Acosta : newspaper, 21 February 1879, vol. 1, no. 45.
Folder 703
* Uriel Acosta : newspaper, 14 March 1879, vol. 1, no. 48.
Folder 690
Haffner, C. (Carl): Die Sternenjungfrau [R] .
Folder --
* Die Sternenjungfrau: playbill (oversized), Deutsches Theater in der Turner Halle, 16 September 1875.
Folder 722
* Die Sternenjungfrau: playbill, Turner-Halle, 13 February 1879.
Folder 688
* Die Sternenjungfrau: newspaper, 15-19 May 1880.
Folder 691
Haffner, C. (Carl): Therese Krones [R]
With music by Adolf Müller.
Folder --
* Therese Krones: playbill, Turner Halle Theater, 14 December 1876.
Folder 688
* Therese Krones: newspaper, 4 October 1890.
Folder 697
Hahn, Rudolf: Gute Nacht [R] .
Folder --
* Gute Nacht: playbill, Aurora Dramatic Circle, Café Logeling, 4 May 1889.
Folder 675
Halévy, Ludovic: Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein--see: Hopp, Julius, Die Großherzogin von Geroldstein .
Folder --
Halm, Friedrich: Griseldis .
Folder --
* Griseldis: newspaper, 24 April 1886.
Folder 704
* Griseldis: newspaper, Saenger-Halle, 17 November 1889.
Folder 701
Halm, Friedrich: Der Sohn der Wildnis [R].
Folder --
* Der Sohn der Wildnis: playbill, 24-28 May 1879.
Folder 678
Held, Ludwig: Die Näherin .
Folder --
* Die Näherin: playbill, 8-10 April [1882].
Folder 680
Henrion, Poly: Die schöne Galathée.
Operetta composed by Franz von Suppé .
Folder --
* Die schöne Galathée: playbill, 14 March 1878.
Folder 677
* Die schöne Galathée: newspaper, 16 April 1892.
Folder 698
* Die schöne Galathée: newspaper, circa April-May 1892.
Folder 698
Herrmann, Louis: König Krause--see under: Keller, Julius .
Folder --
Herrmann, Louis: Unser Doktor--see under: Treptow, Leon.
Folder --
Hersch, Hermann: Die Anna-Lise [R] .
Folder --