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Charles B. Shaw Papers

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Held at: Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College [Contact Us]500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 19081

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in their reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Overview and metadata sections

Charles B. Shaw was the Librarian of Swarthmore College from 1927-1962. He was one of the initial champions of the three-college Tripod library system which became a reality after his retirement.

This collection consists of a typed manuscript of the popular lecture given by Shaw called "Seeing Things in Print" on the history of typography.

"Almost a Unified Library," by Michael Stuart Freeman, at http://www.gslis.utexas.edu/~landc/fulltext/LandC_32_1_Freeman.pdf

The collection is contained in one box.

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The collection

The following materials, originally part of the collection, have been removed and recatalogued:

    Publisher
    Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College
    Finding Aid Author
    FHL staff
    Finding Aid Date
    2013
    Access Restrictions

    Collection is open for research.

    Use Restrictions

    Copyright has not been assigned to Friends Historical Library. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in to the Director. Permission for publication is given on behalf of Friends Historical Library as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by reader.

    Collection Inventory

    "Seeing Things in Print" Manuscript of Popular Lectures on Typographic History, n.d.
    Box 1
    Physical Description

    1 folder

    Lectures on Typefaces.
    Box 2 Box 3
    Scope and Contents

    Stored with PA Lantern Slides

    Print, Suggest