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David A. Morse Papers

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Morse, David A. (David Abner), 1907-1990

The legacy of David Abner Morse, who died on December 1, 1990 at the age of 83, was global. As Director-General of the ILO, a specialized agency of the United Nations, for an unprecedented 22 years, he dedicated himself to improving the lot of workers throughout the world. A man of high ideals and exceptional acumen, he upheld the universality of workers' socioeconomic rights amid the conflicting claims of communist and noncommunist systems and have and have-not nations. In 1969 he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the ILO, a recognition of the organization's contribution to international harmony and prosperity under his leadership.

For Javier Perez de Cuellar, Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1982 to 1991, "Flair for leadership and diplomacy, dynamism, charm, dignity -- these were among his many radiant qualities. But above them all was the compassion and the care for the vulnerable of the earth, and the love of social justice which inspired all his endeavours." For George Shultz, Secretary of Labor in the Nixon administration and Secretary of State in the Reagan administration, Morse possessed an innate, instinctive understanding of the need for standards of behavior. "He saw the human side of enterprise.... He stood, it seemed to me, always for a blend of power and principle, not simply interest and power, but principle and power."

Morse, the son of immigrants Morris Moscovitz and Sara Werblin, was born in New York on May 31, 1907. He grew up in Somerville, New Jersey and attended Rutgers University, graduating in 1929. Deciding on a legal career, he studied law at Harvard University and was admitted to the New Jersey Bar in 1933. In 1937 he married Mildred E. Hockstader, daughter of Leonard Hockstader and Aline Straus and granddaughter of Oscar Straus, Secretary of Commerce and Labor in Theodore Roosevelt's cabinet. The union, which spanned 53 years, could not have been happier.

Morse's interest in and commitment to the public welfare in general and labor concerns in particular were evidenced by his involvement in the New Deal of the Roosevelt administration. Between 1933 and 1939 he held a number of governmental posts, including Chief Counsel for the Petroleum Labor Policy Board of the Department of Interior, Special Assistant to the Attorney General of the United States, and Regional Attorney for the Second Region of the National Labor Relations Board. The objectivity he would be called on to exhibit as head of the ILO was apparent in his appointment in 1941 as Impartial Chairman of the milk industry of metropolitan New York. On leaving the public service, Morse became a named partner in the law firm of Coult, Satz, Tomlinson, and Morse. He also found time to lecture on labor relations, labor law, and administrative law at various educational institutions.

Shortly after the United States entered the Second World War, Morse joined the Army. From 1943 to 1944 he served as head of the Labor Division of the Allied Military Government in Sicily and Italy, where he formulated and implemented labor policies and programs for the American and British liberators. He filled a similar role from 1944 to 1945 as head of the Manpower Division of the United States Group Control Council for Germany. One of his tasks was to work with representatives of Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States to harmonize their approach to labor matters in occupied Germany, an involvement which undoubtedly helped to prepare him for his work at the ILO. At the war's end, he held the rank of lieutenant-colonel and, in 1946, was awarded the Legion of Merit.

On his return to the United States, Morse re-entered civilian life as General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, a post he held from 1945 to 1946 when President Harry Truman named him Assistant Secretary of Labor. In this capacity, he focused his attention on the creation of the Department's Program of International Affairs. Named Under Secretary of Labor in 1947, he briefly filled the position of Acting Secretary on the death of Lewis Schwellenbach in 1948.

It was in this year, too, that Morse embarked on the most significant phase of his career, that of Director-General of the ILO. He was no stranger to this organization, having represented the government of the United States as a member of its Governing Body and as a delegate to its annual International Labor Conference. His election to the post of Director-General, which entailed a move to Geneva, brought with it many challenges. It is a measure of his success in facing them that the ILO changed the regulations which would have limited his tenure to a single ten-year term, renewable for three years, to allow for his re-election, which occurred in 1957, 1962, and 1967. (In 1961, he resigned but was persuaded to reconsider.)

Morse brought to his new position a broad and vigorous vision of the potentiality of his office and the ILO as a whole. He exercised a leadership which was at once impartial and engaged and which incorporated three fundamental principles: the need for socioeconomic reform, the importance of the rule of law, and integrity. Integrity was a quality he demanded of everyone who worked with him, and he was equally protective of the integrity of the ILO, deftly resisting political pressure, whether it stemmed from the rivalries of the superpowers or the process of decolonization. As an American, he was particularly vulnerable to the animus of McCarthyism, but he weathered this storm with firmness and dignity.

According to Gullmar Bergenstrom, Vice Chairman of the Governing Body from 1969 to 1979, "Morse was both Director and General. As Director [he was] a most skillful administrator. He appointed the right people to the various top posts in the Office, which was, of course, a policy decision of highest importance. As General he aggressively defended the ILO's sphere of competence against various young mushrooming and sometimes self-propelling agencies with ambitions to encroach on the ILO field." There was a manifest need for each of these functions. The organization Morse inherited was a product of the Treaty of Versailles, and, amid the burgeoning international bodies of the time, its relevance was under threat. He immediately set out to revitalize the ILO along three lines.

First, Morse believed that the ILO could not be a static entity but, rather, would have to adapt to new circumstances if it was to be an effective force for good in the world. He therefore expanded its sights and its reach beyond its traditional role as a setter of international labor standards. Under his leadership, sweeping organizational changes took place. The membership of the ILO grew from 52 to 121 nations, giving it a universal character. Its staff increased fivefold, from some 600 to some 3000 men and women of diverse nationality. Its annual budget rose from about $4,000,000 to about $60,000,000. Morse laid the foundation for a new headquarters and established an extensive network of field offices. The educational activities of the ILO were given a new impetus with the establishment of the International Institute for Labour Studies in Geneva and the International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training in Turin.

Second, Morse believed that the ILO had a global commitment to build peace, and that orderly socioeconomic change within countries was a prerequisite for peace between countries. Whether the issue was a labor dispute in the ILO itself, the credibility of the labor movement in the Soviet Union, or apartheid in South Africa, Morse maintained that the best way to achieve change was to effect it through existing socioeconomic institutions within the rule of law. He insisted, too, that the ILO's contribution to peace building be truly tripartite, involving workers, governments, and employers in a common quest for a more just world. Morse's commitment to this principle was nowhere more evident than in his position on the 1969 Nobel Peace Prize, a personal tribute as much as an organizational one. Francis Wolf, Legal Advisor of the ILO from 1963 to 1987, was instructed to contact the Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Parliament to request that the award be given solely to the ILO lest individual accomplishments overshadow tripartite ones. Accordingly, on December 10, 1969, Morse accepted the Nobel Peace Prize "On behalf of all our constituents, governments as well as employers and workers of our 121 member States, on behalf of all my staff, and in tribute to all those who in the past have faithfully served our Organisation."

Third, Morse believed that symbolism, however potent, was no substitute for action. He won a reputation as a "practical idealist" as he initiated new forms of technical assistance to enable countries to meet the standards and abide by the principles espoused by the ILO. Underdevelopment and the poverty which betokened it became a major preoccupation for him, though in focusing on the myriad needs of the developing world, he did not neglect the problems confronting industrialized societies. Among the issues Morse addressed through new programs and emphases were labor-management relations, workers' education, management development, supervisory training, manpower planning and employment creation, rural development, and promotion of small-scale industries. The World Employment Programme, launched in 1969, was one of Morse's principal legacies. It sought to raise the employment level and, thus, the quality of life of millions of marginalized men and women through such measures as stemming the migration of populations from rural to urban areas. When Morse relinquished his post as Director-General in 1970, the ILO, once a frail survivor of the discredited League of Nations, could take satisfaction in a new vitality and a new prominence.

Morse did not rest on his laurels upon his return to the United States. He took up the practice of international law in New York and Washington, D. C., assuming a leading role in his firm, which grew considerably in the years which followed. His concern for the welfare of the global community did not abate. He served as an advisor to the United Nations Development Programme, chairing its Advisory Panel on Programme Policy, and was active in such organizations as the World Rehabilitation Fund, the United Nations Association of the United States of America, and the Council on Foreign Relations. His contribution to these and other bodies was highly valued. As David Rockefeller, Honorary Chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, noted in 1994, "He was a man of extraordinary quality and distinction who devoted the major part of his life to public service.... David was an active member of the Council on Foreign Relations for some 30 years, and to many here and around the world, he was a staunch and trusted friend."

Morse's life was crowned with many achievements, and the list of honors he acquired is long. In addition to holding a number of honorary doctorates, he was decorated by countries in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. France made him a Grand Officer of the French Legion of Honor, the highest decoration a foreign national can receive. He also received the Meritorious Public Service Award of the Sidney Hillman Foundation and the Human Rights Award of the International League for the Rights of Man.

What Morse did in life was very much a reflection of whom he was, and it is perhaps in the realm of intangibles that he left his most enduring mark. According to Francis Blanchard, Director-General of the ILO from 1974 to 1989, "David Morse was such a remarkably successful leader because he was such a remarkable human being. His warm personality and great personal charm had an almost magic effect on all with whom he came into contact.... Those of us who worked with him in the International Labour Office remember with admiration, respect and affection how deeply he influenced our work and our lives."

Morse, David A. (David Abner), 1907-1990

The legacy of David Abner Morse, who died on December 1, 1990 at the age of 83, was global. As Director-General of the ILO, a specialized agency of the United Nations, for an unprecedented 22 years, he dedicated himself to improving the lot of workers throughout the world. A man of high ideals and exceptional acumen, he upheld the universality of workers' socioeconomic rights amid the conflicting claims of communist and noncommunist systems and have and have-not nations. In 1969 he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the ILO, a recognition of the organization's contribution to international harmony and prosperity under his leadership.

For Javier Perez de Cuellar, Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1982 to 1991, "Flair for leadership and diplomacy, dynamism, charm, dignity -- these were among his many radiant qualities. But above them all was the compassion and the care for the vulnerable of the earth, and the love of social justice which inspired all his endeavours." For George Shultz, Secretary of Labor in the Nixon administration and Secretary of State in the Reagan administration, Morse possessed an innate, instinctive understanding of the need for standards of behavior. "He saw the human side of enterprise.... He stood, it seemed to me, always for a blend of power and principle, not simply interest and power, but principle and power."

Morse, the son of immigrants Morris Moscovitz and Sara Werblin, was born in New York on May 31, 1907. He grew up in Somerville, New Jersey and attended Rutgers University, graduating in 1929. Deciding on a legal career, he studied law at Harvard University and was admitted to the New Jersey Bar in 1933. In 1937 he married Mildred E. Hockstader, daughter of Leonard Hockstader and Aline Straus and granddaughter of Oscar Straus, Secretary of Commerce and Labor in Theodore Roosevelt's cabinet. The union, which spanned 53 years, could not have been happier.

Morse's interest in and commitment to the public welfare in general and labor concerns in particular were evidenced by his involvement in the New Deal of the Roosevelt administration. Between 1933 and 1939 he held a number of governmental posts, including Chief Counsel for the Petroleum Labor Policy Board of the Department of Interior, Special Assistant to the Attorney General of the United States, and Regional Attorney for the Second Region of the National Labor Relations Board. The objectivity he would be called on to exhibit as head of the ILO was apparent in his appointment in 1941 as Impartial Chairman of the milk industry of metropolitan New York. On leaving the public service, Morse became a named partner in the law firm of Coult, Satz, Tomlinson, and Morse. He also found time to lecture on labor relations, labor law, and administrative law at various educational institutions.

Shortly after the United States entered the Second World War, Morse joined the Army. From 1943 to 1944 he served as head of the Labor Division of the Allied Military Government in Sicily and Italy, where he formulated and implemented labor policies and programs for the American and British liberators. He filled a similar role from 1944 to 1945 as head of the Manpower Division of the United States Group Control Council for Germany. One of his tasks was to work with representatives of Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States to harmonize their approach to labor matters in occupied Germany, an involvement which undoubtedly helped to prepare him for his work at the ILO. At the war's end, he held the rank of lieutenant-colonel and, in 1946, was awarded the Legion of Merit.

On his return to the United States, Morse re-entered civilian life as General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, a post he held from 1945 to 1946 when President Harry Truman named him Assistant Secretary of Labor. In this capacity, he focused his attention on the creation of the Department's Program of International Affairs. Named Under Secretary of Labor in 1947, he briefly filled the position of Acting Secretary on the death of Lewis Schwellenbach in 1948.

It was in this year, too, that Morse embarked on the most significant phase of his career, that of Director-General of the ILO. He was no stranger to this organization, having represented the government of the United States as a member of its Governing Body and as a delegate to its annual International Labor Conference. His election to the post of Director-General, which entailed a move to Geneva, brought with it many challenges. It is a measure of his success in facing them that the ILO changed the regulations which would have limited his tenure to a single ten-year term, renewable for three years, to allow for his re-election, which occurred in 1957, 1962, and 1967. (In 1961, he resigned but was persuaded to reconsider.)

Morse brought to his new position a broad and vigorous vision of the potentiality of his office and the ILO as a whole. He exercised a leadership which was at once impartial and engaged and which incorporated three fundamental principles: the need for socioeconomic reform, the importance of the rule of law, and integrity. Integrity was a quality he demanded of everyone who worked with him, and he was equally protective of the integrity of the ILO, deftly resisting political pressure, whether it stemmed from the rivalries of the superpowers or the process of decolonization. As an American, he was particularly vulnerable to the animus of McCarthyism, but he weathered this storm with firmness and dignity.

According to Gullmar Bergenstrom, Vice Chairman of the Governing Body from 1969 to 1979, "Morse was both Director and General. As Director [he was] a most skillful administrator. He appointed the right people to the various top posts in the Office, which was, of course, a policy decision of highest importance. As General he aggressively defended the ILO's sphere of competence against various young mushrooming and sometimes self-propelling agencies with ambitions to encroach on the ILO field." There was a manifest need for each of these functions. The organization Morse inherited was a product of the Treaty of Versailles, and, amid the burgeoning international bodies of the time, its relevance was under threat. He immediately set out to revitalize the ILO along three lines.

First, Morse believed that the ILO could not be a static entity but, rather, would have to adapt to new circumstances if it was to be an effective force for good in the world. He therefore expanded its sights and its reach beyond its traditional role as a setter of international labor standards. Under his leadership, sweeping organizational changes took place. The membership of the ILO grew from 52 to 121 nations, giving it a universal character. Its staff increased fivefold, from some 600 to some 3000 men and women of diverse nationality. Its annual budget rose from about $4,000,000 to about $60,000,000. Morse laid the foundation for a new headquarters and established an extensive network of field offices. The educational activities of the ILO were given a new impetus with the establishment of the International Institute for Labour Studies in Geneva and the International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training in Turin.

Second, Morse believed that the ILO had a global commitment to build peace, and that orderly socioeconomic change within countries was a prerequisite for peace between countries. Whether the issue was a labor dispute in the ILO itself, the credibility of the labor movement in the Soviet Union, or apartheid in South Africa, Morse maintained that the best way to achieve change was to effect it through existing socioeconomic institutions within the rule of law. He insisted, too, that the ILO's contribution to peace building be truly tripartite, involving workers, governments, and employers in a common quest for a more just world. Morse's commitment to this principle was nowhere more evident than in his position on the 1969 Nobel Peace Prize, a personal tribute as much as an organizational one. Francis Wolf, Legal Advisor of the ILO from 1963 to 1987, was instructed to contact the Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Parliament to request that the award be given solely to the ILO lest individual accomplishments overshadow tripartite ones. Accordingly, on December 10, 1969, Morse accepted the Nobel Peace Prize "On behalf of all our constituents, governments as well as employers and workers of our 121 member States, on behalf of all my staff, and in tribute to all those who in the past have faithfully served our Organisation."

Third, Morse believed that symbolism, however potent, was no substitute for action. He won a reputation as a "practical idealist" as he initiated new forms of technical assistance to enable countries to meet the standards and abide by the principles espoused by the ILO. Underdevelopment and the poverty which betokened it became a major preoccupation for him, though in focusing on the myriad needs of the developing world, he did not neglect the problems confronting industrialized societies. Among the issues Morse addressed through new programs and emphases were labor-management relations, workers' education, management development, supervisory training, manpower planning and employment creation, rural development, and promotion of small-scale industries. The World Employment Programme, launched in 1969, was one of Morse's principal legacies. It sought to raise the employment level and, thus, the quality of life of millions of marginalized men and women through such measures as stemming the migration of populations from rural to urban areas. When Morse relinquished his post as Director-General in 1970, the ILO, once a frail survivor of the discredited League of Nations, could take satisfaction in a new vitality and a new prominence.

Morse did not rest on his laurels upon his return to the United States. He took up the practice of international law in New York and Washington, D. C., assuming a leading role in his firm, which grew considerably in the years which followed. His concern for the welfare of the global community did not abate. He served as an advisor to the United Nations Development Programme, chairing its Advisory Panel on Programme Policy, and was active in such organizations as the World Rehabilitation Fund, the United Nations Association of the United States of America, and the Council on Foreign Relations. His contribution to these and other bodies was highly valued. As David Rockefeller, Honorary Chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, noted in 1994, "He was a man of extraordinary quality and distinction who devoted the major part of his life to public service.... David was an active member of the Council on Foreign Relations for some 30 years, and to many here and around the world, he was a staunch and trusted friend."

Morse's life was crowned with many achievements, and the list of honors he acquired is long. In addition to holding a number of honorary doctorates, he was decorated by countries in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. France made him a Grand Officer of the French Legion of Honor, the highest decoration a foreign national can receive. He also received the Meritorious Public Service Award of the Sidney Hillman Foundation and the Human Rights Award of the International League for the Rights of Man.

What Morse did in life was very much a reflection of whom he was, and it is perhaps in the realm of intangibles that he left his most enduring mark. According to Francis Blanchard, Director-General of the ILO from 1974 to 1989, "David Morse was such a remarkably successful leader because he was such a remarkable human being. His warm personality and great personal charm had an almost magic effect on all with whom he came into contact.... Those of us who worked with him in the International Labour Office remember with admiration, respect and affection how deeply he influenced our work and our lives."

Morse, David A. (David Abner), 1907-1990

The legacy of David Abner Morse, who died on December 1, 1990 at the age of 83, was global. As Director-General of the ILO, a specialized agency of the United Nations, for an unprecedented 22 years, he dedicated himself to improving the lot of workers throughout the world. A man of high ideals and exceptional acumen, he upheld the universality of workers' socioeconomic rights amid the conflicting claims of communist and noncommunist systems and have and have-not nations. In 1969 he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the ILO, a recognition of the organization's contribution to international harmony and prosperity under his leadership.

For Javier Perez de Cuellar, Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1982 to 1991, "Flair for leadership and diplomacy, dynamism, charm, dignity -- these were among his many radiant qualities. But above them all was the compassion and the care for the vulnerable of the earth, and the love of social justice which inspired all his endeavours." For George Shultz, Secretary of Labor in the Nixon administration and Secretary of State in the Reagan administration, Morse possessed an innate, instinctive understanding of the need for standards of behavior. "He saw the human side of enterprise.... He stood, it seemed to me, always for a blend of power and principle, not simply interest and power, but principle and power."

Morse, the son of immigrants Morris Moscovitz and Sara Werblin, was born in New York on May 31, 1907. He grew up in Somerville, New Jersey and attended Rutgers University, graduating in 1929. Deciding on a legal career, he studied law at Harvard University and was admitted to the New Jersey Bar in 1933. In 1937 he married Mildred E. Hockstader, daughter of Leonard Hockstader and Aline Straus and granddaughter of Oscar Straus, Secretary of Commerce and Labor in Theodore Roosevelt's cabinet. The union, which spanned 53 years, could not have been happier.

Morse's interest in and commitment to the public welfare in general and labor concerns in particular were evidenced by his involvement in the New Deal of the Roosevelt administration. Between 1933 and 1939 he held a number of governmental posts, including Chief Counsel for the Petroleum Labor Policy Board of the Department of Interior, Special Assistant to the Attorney General of the United States, and Regional Attorney for the Second Region of the National Labor Relations Board. The objectivity he would be called on to exhibit as head of the ILO was apparent in his appointment in 1941 as Impartial Chairman of the milk industry of metropolitan New York. On leaving the public service, Morse became a named partner in the law firm of Coult, Satz, Tomlinson, and Morse. He also found time to lecture on labor relations, labor law, and administrative law at various educational institutions.

Shortly after the United States entered the Second World War, Morse joined the Army. From 1943 to 1944 he served as head of the Labor Division of the Allied Military Government in Sicily and Italy, where he formulated and implemented labor policies and programs for the American and British liberators. He filled a similar role from 1944 to 1945 as head of the Manpower Division of the United States Group Control Council for Germany. One of his tasks was to work with representatives of Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States to harmonize their approach to labor matters in occupied Germany, an involvement which undoubtedly helped to prepare him for his work at the ILO. At the war's end, he held the rank of lieutenant-colonel and, in 1946, was awarded the Legion of Merit.

On his return to the United States, Morse re-entered civilian life as General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, a post he held from 1945 to 1946 when President Harry Truman named him Assistant Secretary of Labor. In this capacity, he focused his attention on the creation of the Department's Program of International Affairs. Named Under Secretary of Labor in 1947, he briefly filled the position of Acting Secretary on the death of Lewis Schwellenbach in 1948.

It was in this year, too, that Morse embarked on the most significant phase of his career, that of Director-General of the ILO. He was no stranger to this organization, having represented the government of the United States as a member of its Governing Body and as a delegate to its annual International Labor Conference. His election to the post of Director-General, which entailed a move to Geneva, brought with it many challenges. It is a measure of his success in facing them that the ILO changed the regulations which would have limited his tenure to a single ten-year term, renewable for three years, to allow for his re-election, which occurred in 1957, 1962, and 1967. (In 1961, he resigned but was persuaded to reconsider.)

Morse brought to his new position a broad and vigorous vision of the potentiality of his office and the ILO as a whole. He exercised a leadership which was at once impartial and engaged and which incorporated three fundamental principles: the need for socioeconomic reform, the importance of the rule of law, and integrity. Integrity was a quality he demanded of everyone who worked with him, and he was equally protective of the integrity of the ILO, deftly resisting political pressure, whether it stemmed from the rivalries of the superpowers or the process of decolonization. As an American, he was particularly vulnerable to the animus of McCarthyism, but he weathered this storm with firmness and dignity.

According to Gullmar Bergenstrom, Vice Chairman of the Governing Body from 1969 to 1979, "Morse was both Director and General. As Director [he was] a most skillful administrator. He appointed the right people to the various top posts in the Office, which was, of course, a policy decision of highest importance. As General he aggressively defended the ILO's sphere of competence against various young mushrooming and sometimes self-propelling agencies with ambitions to encroach on the ILO field." There was a manifest need for each of these functions. The organization Morse inherited was a product of the Treaty of Versailles, and, amid the burgeoning international bodies of the time, its relevance was under threat. He immediately set out to revitalize the ILO along three lines.

First, Morse believed that the ILO could not be a static entity but, rather, would have to adapt to new circumstances if it was to be an effective force for good in the world. He therefore expanded its sights and its reach beyond its traditional role as a setter of international labor standards. Under his leadership, sweeping organizational changes took place. The membership of the ILO grew from 52 to 121 nations, giving it a universal character. Its staff increased fivefold, from some 600 to some 3000 men and women of diverse nationality. Its annual budget rose from about $4,000,000 to about $60,000,000. Morse laid the foundation for a new headquarters and established an extensive network of field offices. The educational activities of the ILO were given a new impetus with the establishment of the International Institute for Labour Studies in Geneva and the International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training in Turin.

Second, Morse believed that the ILO had a global commitment to build peace, and that orderly socioeconomic change within countries was a prerequisite for peace between countries. Whether the issue was a labor dispute in the ILO itself, the credibility of the labor movement in the Soviet Union, or apartheid in South Africa, Morse maintained that the best way to achieve change was to effect it through existing socioeconomic institutions within the rule of law. He insisted, too, that the ILO's contribution to peace building be truly tripartite, involving workers, governments, and employers in a common quest for a more just world. Morse's commitment to this principle was nowhere more evident than in his position on the 1969 Nobel Peace Prize, a personal tribute as much as an organizational one. Francis Wolf, Legal Advisor of the ILO from 1963 to 1987, was instructed to contact the Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Parliament to request that the award be given solely to the ILO lest individual accomplishments overshadow tripartite ones. Accordingly, on December 10, 1969, Morse accepted the Nobel Peace Prize "On behalf of all our constituents, governments as well as employers and workers of our 121 member States, on behalf of all my staff, and in tribute to all those who in the past have faithfully served our Organisation."

Third, Morse believed that symbolism, however potent, was no substitute for action. He won a reputation as a "practical idealist" as he initiated new forms of technical assistance to enable countries to meet the standards and abide by the principles espoused by the ILO. Underdevelopment and the poverty which betokened it became a major preoccupation for him, though in focusing on the myriad needs of the developing world, he did not neglect the problems confronting industrialized societies. Among the issues Morse addressed through new programs and emphases were labor-management relations, workers' education, management development, supervisory training, manpower planning and employment creation, rural development, and promotion of small-scale industries. The World Employment Programme, launched in 1969, was one of Morse's principal legacies. It sought to raise the employment level and, thus, the quality of life of millions of marginalized men and women through such measures as stemming the migration of populations from rural to urban areas. When Morse relinquished his post as Director-General in 1970, the ILO, once a frail survivor of the discredited League of Nations, could take satisfaction in a new vitality and a new prominence.

Morse did not rest on his laurels upon his return to the United States. He took up the practice of international law in New York and Washington, D. C., assuming a leading role in his firm, which grew considerably in the years which followed. His concern for the welfare of the global community did not abate. He served as an advisor to the United Nations Development Programme, chairing its Advisory Panel on Programme Policy, and was active in such organizations as the World Rehabilitation Fund, the United Nations Association of the United States of America, and the Council on Foreign Relations. His contribution to these and other bodies was highly valued. As David Rockefeller, Honorary Chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, noted in 1994, "He was a man of extraordinary quality and distinction who devoted the major part of his life to public service.... David was an active member of the Council on Foreign Relations for some 30 years, and to many here and around the world, he was a staunch and trusted friend."

Morse's life was crowned with many achievements, and the list of honors he acquired is long. In addition to holding a number of honorary doctorates, he was decorated by countries in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. France made him a Grand Officer of the French Legion of Honor, the highest decoration a foreign national can receive. He also received the Meritorious Public Service Award of the Sidney Hillman Foundation and the Human Rights Award of the International League for the Rights of Man.

What Morse did in life was very much a reflection of whom he was, and it is perhaps in the realm of intangibles that he left his most enduring mark. According to Francis Blanchard, Director-General of the ILO from 1974 to 1989, "David Morse was such a remarkably successful leader because he was such a remarkable human being. His warm personality and great personal charm had an almost magic effect on all with whom he came into contact.... Those of us who worked with him in the International Labour Office remember with admiration, respect and affection how deeply he influenced our work and our lives."

The Morse Papers consists of textual, microform, audiovisual, and photographic material. The preponderance, though by no means all, of this material relates to the ILO. While its focus is inevitably more personal than organizational, it reveals the varied facets of Morse's work and that of his staff, the delegates to the International Labour Conference, and the members of the Governing Body. Other phases of Morse's life are well-represented, too, including his years in the Army (1942-1945), the Department of Labor (1946-1948), and the United Nations Development Programme (1970-1972). Material of a private nature is also present, the most notable elements being a collection of wartime correspondence between Morse and his wife, Mildred, and a variety of mementos, such as photographs, newspaper clippings, and documents, from the couple's youth and family. While the Morse Papers are not without lacunae, particularly with regard to Morse's prewar career, they shed ample light on his activities, the concerns which animated them, and the relationships in which they were centered. Researchers can expect to encounter both the large and the small in Morse's life -- from his views on internationalism to his views on small-town New Jersey -- and, in the process, construct a rounded picture of an influential public figure in the last half of the twentieth century.

Throughout his life, Morse met and corresponded with many individuals of national and international significance concerning labor issues. This collection contains correspondence or records of discussion with Dean Acheson, Leonid Brezhnev, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Dag Hammarskjold, Averell Harriman, Paul G. Hoffman, C. Wilfred Jenks, David Lilienthal, George Marshall, Leopold Senghor, and U Thant.

The David A. Morse Papers are divided into nine series (two of which have been further divided into five subseries) and are arranged as follows:

Portions of the Morse Papers are available on microfilm. These are Series 1 (Subseries 1), Series 2 (Subseries 1 to 5), and Series 3. Search for "Selections from the David A. Morse papers [microform]" in library catalog.

The Morse Papers were donated to Princeton University in multiple installments, beginning in 1972, by David Morse and, following his death, by his wife, Mildred. Included in this material are eight reels of microfilm donated to Princeton University in 1976 by Leon Gordenker, a member of its faculty. Designed to supplement Morse's donations, this microfilm consists for the most part of records generated or acquired by the Office of the Director-General of the ILO during Morse's tenure. Another accrual in 2011 from Jean Straus documents the end of David Morse's life and his memorial.

For preservation reasons, original analog and digital media may not be read or played back in the reading room. Users may visually inspect physical media but may not remove it from its enclosure. All analog audiovisual media must be digitized to preservation-quality standards prior to use. Audiovisual digitization requests are processed by an approved third-party vendor. Please note, the transfer time required can be as little as several weeks to as long as several months and there may be financial costs associated with the process. Requests should be directed through the Ask Us Form.

This collection was arranged and described by John S. Weeren with the able assistance of Fifi Chan and Tina Wang in 1995. Mildred Morse provided invaluable help in identifying photographs and contextualizing portions of this material. Additions received since 1995 were integrated into the collection by Adriane Hanson in 2008. Finding aid written by John S. Weeren in 1995. A subsequent accession in March 2011 was added to the collection as its own series, and the finding aid was updated at this time.

Duplicates were separated from the April 2008 accession. No information about appraisal is available for the other accessions associated with this collection.

People
Organization
Subject

Publisher
Public Policy Papers
Finding Aid Author
John S. Weeren
Finding Aid Date
1998
Sponsor
These papers were processed with the generous support of Mildred H. Morse, wife of the late David A. Morse, and the John Foster and Janet Avery Dulles Fund.
Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Single copies may be made for research purposes. To cite or publish quotations that fall within Fair Use, as defined under U. S. Copyright Law, no permission is required. For instances beyond Fair Use, it is the responsibility of the researcher to determine whether any permissions related to copyright, privacy, publicity, or any other rights are necessary for their intended use of the Library's materials, and to obtain all required permissions from any existing rights holders, if they have not already done so. Princeton University Library's Special Collections does not charge any permission or use fees for the publication of images of materials from our collections, nor does it require researchers to obtain its permission for said use. The department does request that its collections be properly cited and images credited. More detailed information can be found on the Copyright, Credit and Citations Guidelines page on our website. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us through the Ask Us! form.

Collection Inventory

Scope and Contents

Series 1: International Labour Organization Files (1934-1991) documents Morse's involvement with the ILO, predominantly concerned with his tenure as Director-General and also including material that both predates and postdates that period. Included are materials on the conferences, reports, travels, and issues faced by Morse and the organization. Please see the subseries descriptions in the contents list for additional information about individual subseries.

Arrangement

Divided into five subseries: Director-General's Papers, Microfilm, Reports of Director-General, Missions of Director-General, and Proceedings of International Labor Conference.

Physical Description

46 boxes

Scope and Contents

Series 1: International Labour Organisation Files, Subseries 1: Director-General's Papers (1934-1991) consists of a variety of material, including letters, memoranda, articles, booklets, and reports, relating to the ILO. Though this material both predates and postdates Morse's tenure as Director-General, illustrating his long association with the ILO, it is primarily concerned with his years in office. The material in this subseries represents only a fraction of the documentation which passed through Morse's hands in the course of his long sojourn in Geneva, but its selectiveness imbues it with a distinctly personal quality. Much of this material consists of items which were highly important to Morse, though in many cases, matters of policy were not involved. There are numerous messages of congratulation on the occasions of his multiple elections to the post of Director-General. Also Pope Paul VI's visit to the headquarters of the ILO and the conferral on the ILO of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969 are well-documented, for both were of great symbolic significance to Morse.

Also preserved, though not for celebratory purposes, are a number of revealing memoranda of meetings between Morse and prominent figures of his day. These include a discussion with Vincent Auriol in 1948 in which the President of France took exception to the American media's calls for "a strong man" in the Elysee Palace, a heated discussion with George Meany in 1963 in which the head of the AFL-CIO accused Morse of being soft on communism, and a discussion with Adlai Stevenson within a week of his death in 1965 in which the two-time Democratic presidential candidate voiced his dissatisfaction with the Johnson administration's policies in Vietnam and the Dominican Republic. Of particular interest, too, are a pair of memoranda recording Morse's discussions with representatives of the Soviet Union and the United States in 1970 on the contentious matter of the appointment of a Soviet Assistant Director-General. Morse's diplomatic skills are evident and, in particular, his ability to prolong a process whose resolution could (and ultimately did) have negative consequences for the ILO. Other insights offered by these documents relate to the international "jockeying and politicking" (to use Morse's words), which can precede the election of the head of an organization such as the ILO; the implications of domestic politics and, specifically, McCarthyism, for international civil servants of American nationality; and Morse's relationship with his staff as manifested in his correspondence with two pivotal subordinates: Jef Rens, his second in command in Geneva, and Thacher Winslow, head of the ILO's office in Washington, D.C.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent or topic.

Physical Description

14 boxes

"Action of the ILO: Problems and Prospects", 1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Activities of the ILO: 1970", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Albert Thomas: 1878-1978", 1978. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Algeria, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The Amazing I.L.O.", 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Arbitration Association - International Labour Organisation Collaboration, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Andean Indian Project, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Argentina, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Auriol, Vincent, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bevin, Ernest, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Biography of Morse, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Blamont, Philippe, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bolivia, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Brazil, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Budget for 1965, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bulgaria, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bustamante, Jose L, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Castberg, Johan, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ceylon, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

China, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Colombia, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Congo, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Constitution, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Constitutional Issues, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cox, Robert W, 1956-1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Criticism of International Labour Organisation, 1948-1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Curtis, Thomas B, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"David Morse and His Global Skill-Building Program", 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"David Morse et l'Art", 1991. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

DesRochers, Hermance, 1988. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Development of the I.L.O. during Mr. Morse's Terms of Office as Director-General", 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Discrimination in Employment, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Drug Abuse, 1969-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Eastern European Staff, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Egypt, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Congratulations, 1948-1949. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Election of Morse as Director-General: Congratulations, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Congratulations, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Congratulations, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Governing Body, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Governing Body, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Governing Body, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Governing Body, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: News Clippings, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: News Clippings, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: News Clippings, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Pre-Election Correspondence, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Pre-Election Correspondence, 1956-1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Pre-Election Correspondence, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Pre-Election Correspondence, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Election of Morse as Director-General: Pre-Election Correspondence, 1965-1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Entry of United States into International Labour Organisation, 1934. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

European Economic Community, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

50th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation, 1967-1969. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

50th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Forced Labor, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

40th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

France, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gabon, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Germany, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Governing Body: Finance Committee, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Governing Body: Illness of Morse, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hildebrandt, George H, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hungary, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Index to ILO Panorama, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training, 1970. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training, 1985. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Institute for Labour Studies, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (29th Session): Constitutional Questions, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (29th Session): News Clippings, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (30th Session): News Clippings, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (31st Session): Reports Thereon, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (31st Session): United States Delegation, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (32nd Session): Report Thereon, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (35th Session): News Clippings, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (36th Session): Report Thereon, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (40th Session): Press Releases, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (43rd Session): Report Thereon, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (49th Session): News Clipping, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (53rd Session): News Clippings, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (54th Session): Report Thereon, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"International Labor in Crisis", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Israel, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kelley, Augustine B, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kennedy, John F.: Death, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lebanon, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Loyalty Proceedings, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Loyalty Proceedings, 1954-1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Marshall, George C, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Meany, George, 1961-1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Minister of Labor for the World", 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Myrddin-Evans, Guildhaume, 1948-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Association of Manufacturers, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

New Headquarters, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

News Clippings Concerning Morse, 1949-1990. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nigeria, 1976. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nobel Peace Prize: Commemorative Booklet, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nobel Peace Prize: Correspondence Regarding Nomination, 1949-1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nobel Peace Prize: "The ILO Receives the Nobel Peace Prize", 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nobel Peace Prize: Messages, 1969. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Nobel Peace Prize: News Clippings, 1969-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nobel Peace Prize: "20 Years Ago, the Nobel Peace Prize for the ILO", 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Norway, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oath of Office, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"L'Opinion de M. David A. Morse", 1976. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Organization for European Economic Cooperation, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Peru, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Phelan, Edward J, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pope Paul VI's Visit to Geneva, 1969. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Portugal, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Post-Retirement Correspondence, 1970-1975. 6 folders.
Physical Description

6 folders

Post-Retirement Correspondence, 1976-1990. 13 folders.
Physical Description

13 folders

Presentation of Portrait to International Labour Office, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Press Releases, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"A Programme for Strengthening the International Labour Organisation", 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rao, Raghunath, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Raza, S. Hashim, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rens, Jef, 1948-1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Resignation of Morse as Director-General, 1961-1963. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Announcement, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Farewells, 1970. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Governing Body, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: News Clippings, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Signatures of Colleagues, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Review of the Administrative and Management Procedures Concerning the Programme and Budget of the ILO", 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rusk, Dean, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

70th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation, 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Simultaneous Interpretation System, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The 'Socialistic' ILO", 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

South Africa, 1963-1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Soviet Union, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Spain, 1965-1969. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

State of World Labor, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stevenson, Adlai, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sudan, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Syria, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Technical Assistance, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Thomas, Elbert D, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Le Tribunal Administratif de l'Organisation Internationale du Travail", 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United States, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The United States and the International Labor Organization: Background Paper", 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The United States Assaults the I.L.O.", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United States Association of the International Labor Organization, 1990. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"United States' Participation in the ILO: Redefining the Role", 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Venezuela, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Vietnam, 1966-1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Villot, Jean Cardinal, 1969-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Winslow, Thacher, 1948. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Working Party on Structure, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Employment, 1970-1973. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

"World Labor is Jerseyan's Task", 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"World Traveler: ILO's David A. Morse Directs a Far-Flung Program", 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wou-Saofong, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wou-Saofong, 1950-1958. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Wright, Ralph, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Zempel, Arnold, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 1: International Labour Organisation Files, Subseries 2: Microfilm (1938-1973) consists of material contained in the "cabinet files," that is, in the files of the Office of the Director-General of the ILO. The lion's share of this material was created during Morse's tenure, while the rest dates from the time of his predecessors, John Winant and Edward Phelan, and his successor, Wilfred Jenks. There are two sets of microfilm in this subseries, reflecting its twofold provenance. Set One, which Morse supplied, comprises eleven 16mm reels of microfilm spanning the period between 1938 and 1961. Set Two, which Professor Gordenker supplied, comprises eight 35mm reels of microfilm spanning the period between 1948 and 1973. Both sets consist for the most part of correspondence, official and personal; records of meetings; and reports by Morse and his staff.

The official correspondence is chiefly composed of letters or memoranda between Morse, officials of the ILO, and representatives of various countries and business and trade union organizations. The personal correspondence generally takes the form of thank you notes of various kinds, congratulatory messages, and letters concerning travel plans. The records of meetings, for their part, detail who attended, what issues were raised, and what conclusions or decisions were reached. A wide range of reports are represented, including reports on missions carried out by Morse or his staff, documents which frequently include a schedule and abbreviated summary of the trip; reports submitted to Morse on various subjects, providing him with the background, analysis, and projections essential to informed decision-making; and reports presented by Morse at various meetings and assemblies. Interspersed throughout this subseries are newspaper clippings on various issues of interest to the ILO; excerpts from or copies of publications, including serials such as the Congressional Record and booklets such as "Labor's Role in Newly Developing Countries;" and mementos from Morse's travels, among which can be found the business cards of individuals with whom he met and the programs of events at which he spoke.

Neither set of microfilm possesses a discernible structure, but an index is available which lists the subjects, together with their respective date spans, on a reel by reel basis. A number has been assigned to each subject, denoting its incorporation in a formal filing system. What this subseries lacks in orderliness, it more than makes up for in diversity. Topics covered in Set One range from the re-entry of Paraguay into the ILO to the use of the Swiss diplomatic pouch and cipher to the appointment of an Assistant Director-General from the Near and Middle East. Topics covered in Set Two range from the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees to the ILO's relations with Bulgaria to the Nobel Peace Prize. Set Two is less sweeping than Set One, but the quality of its reproductions is much higher. Much of the fourth reel in Set One, for instance, is illegible, and other reels impose a heavy burden on the eyes. A further challenge stems from the multinational character of the ILO. English-speaking scholars can expect to encounter a variety of foreign languages. While French predominates, there is also a smattering of Spanish, German, Arabic, and Chinese.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by year.

Physical Description

2 boxes

Eleven 16mm Reels of International Labour Office Records (Index Included), 1938-1961. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Eight 35mm Reels of International Labour Office Records (Index Included), 1948-1973. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scope and Contents

Series 1: International Labour Organisation Files, Subseries 3: Reports of Director-General (1949-1970) consists of lengthy reports on a variety of matters which Morse placed before the annual International Labour Conference, typically held in Geneva, and periodic regional conferences held in cities as far afield as Montevideo and New Delhi. The latter include the Conference of American States Members, the Asian Regional Conference, the European Regional Conference, and the African Regional Conference. Throughout Morse's tenure, the report of the Director-General, who serves as Secretary-General of the International Labour Conference and, frequently, of the regional conferences, played a central role in the deliberations of these assemblies. Heading, as they did, the agenda of each conference, Morse's reports were designed both to inform and animate debate, and to transcend a simple recitation of the ILO's activities by broaching issues of organizational, regional, and global importance. As Morse noted in his report to the International Labour Conference in 1951, "If these pages stimulate thought and discussion, if they help some to see more clearly than before the spirit which must inspire our work, if they encourage others to intensify their efforts to promote understanding between peoples and to improve the lot of their fellow men, they will have served their purpose."

Morse's reports to the regional conferences focused on phenomena of regional concern. Thus, in his report to the First African Regional Conference in 1960, "the year of Africa," he examined Africa's economic background, its patterns of employment, the education of its workers, and the field of action it presented to the ILO, both in terms of problems and solutions. Similarly, in his report to the Fifth Asian Regional Conference in 1962, he explored Asia's economic achievements and shortcomings as well as ways of surmounting the challenges posed by its developmental course, touching on everything from entrepreneurship and balance of payments to manpower planning and agrarian reform. In his reports to the International Labour Conference, Morse employed a larger canvas, offering broad socioeconomic overviews as well as discrete themes for discussion. He also provided an account of the ILO's activities in the preceding year. Among the topics he covered were productivity and welfare, workers' housing, automation and other technological developments, youth and work, labor relations, and the program and structure of the ILO. Morse's later reports are more voluminous, reflecting the introduction of a two-part format, one focusing on a particular issue and the other documenting the activities of the ILO.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by year.

Physical Description

6 boxes

Report to Fourth Conference of American States Members: Montevideo, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Asian Regional Conference: Ceylon, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Fifth Conference of American States Members:, Rio de Janeiro, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Asian Regional Conference: Tokyo, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to European Regional Conference: Geneva, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Sixth Conference of American States Members: Havana, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Fourth Asian Regional Conference: New Delhi, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1958. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to First African Regional Conference: Lagos, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Seventh Conference of American States Members:, Buenos Aires, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Fifth Asian Regional Conference: Melbourne, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Second African Regional Conference: Addis Ababa, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Eighth Conference of American States Members: Ottawa, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Sixth Asian Regional Conference: Tokyo, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Third African Regional Conference: Accra, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to Ninth Conference of American States Members: Caracas, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Report to International Labour Conference: Geneva, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 1: International Labour Organisation Files, Subseries 4: Missions of Director-General (1948-1969) consists of material, in the form of discrete volumes, documenting Morse's official visits, as Director-General, to ILO member countries throughout the world. His missions range from his visit to Italy in connection with the then newly established Manpower Programme of the ILO in 1948 to his attendance at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in Norway in 1969. In 1967, one of his busiest years, he travelled to Cameroon, the two Congos, Cyprus, Gabon, Ireland, Morocco, the Vatican, and Venezuela. The volumes in this subseries usually contain a detailed report on his mission and a background briefing on the host country. However, for some missions, only the background briefing is present, attributable in certain cases to the fact that the trip was merely a proposal.

The report component of these volumes contains detailed information on Morse's visits in the form of schedules, speeches, records of conversations, brochures, newspaper clippings, and photographs. The records of conversations are especially interesting. For example, during Morse's visit to the Vatican in 1967, Pope Paul VI made three direct and precise requests of the ILO: continue its mission; place an emphasis on education; and pay particular attention to Latin America, a field of obvious importance to the Church. In another conversation, this time with Leonid Brezhnev during Morse's mission to the Soviet Union in 1963, Brezhnev proudly described the various changes which had occurred in Moscow, the industrial sector, energy consumption, transportation, and the agricultural sector since his guest's last visit, noting, however, that the "Bolsheviks" were not content to be earthbound and, indeed, had already travelled millions of kilometers in space. He made it clear that the Soviet Union, though powerful, was pacific and that if the United States grasped this, the storm in which the superpowers found themselves would pass. As to the background briefings in these volumes, they consist of information on various aspects of the host country such as its geographical, social, financial, and political situation, and biographies of its leaders.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by year.

Physical Description

17 boxes

Missions to Italy, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Uruguay, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Czechoslovakia, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Finland, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to India, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Poland, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to the Netherlands, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Yugoslavia, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Egypt, 1953-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Federal Republic of Germany, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Israel, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Israel, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Spain, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to India, Burma, Thailand, Pakistan, and Lebanon, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to U.S.S.R., Poland, Austria, and Czechoslovakia, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to United States and Canada, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions to Vatican, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Federal Republic of Germany, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Israel, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Morocco, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Proposed Mission to Tunisia, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to United Kingdom, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to United States, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Yugoslavia, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Greece, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Nigeria, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Paris, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Portugal, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Rumania, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, and Uruguay, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Bulgaria, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Norway, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Venezuela, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Proposed Mission to Ghana, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Tunisia, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Morocco, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Poland, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to U.S.S.R., 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to United Arab Republic, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Washington, D.C., 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Czechoslovakia, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Ethiopia, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Libya, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Hungary, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Spain, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Algeria, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Mali, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Senegal, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Sweden, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Cameroon, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Congo (Brazzaville), 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Congo (Kinshasa), 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Cyprus, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Gabon, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Ireland, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Morocco, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Venezuela, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Cairo, Kuwait, and Beirut, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Ethiopia, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to India, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Japan, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to the Philippines, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Republic of China, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Rumania, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Thailand, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mission to Scandinavia, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 1: International Labour Organisation Files, Subseries 5: Proceedings of International Labour Conference (1946-1970) consists of the Record of Proceedings of the 30th through the 54th session of the International Labour Conference, the ILO's supreme legislative body, as well as its 28th maritime session. These annual assemblies serve as an international meeting place for the representatives of the three constituents of the ILO: workers, governments, and employers. Each member country is entitled to send four delegates to the International Labour Conference, two representing government and one each from the ranks of workers and employers, as well as a finite number of advisors. A principal object of the International Labour Conference is to set forth tentative international standards in the form of recommendations and conventions governing everything from ships' medicine chests to workmen's compensation. These are subsequently submitted to member countries for consideration and ratification. Other functions of the International Labour Conference include the triennial election of members of the Governing Body and the annual adoption of the budget. The International Labour Conference is also a forum for debate, which over the years has encompassed issues ranging from maternity protection to the protection of workers' health in their places of employment to the employment of young persons in underground coal mines.

Each Record of Proceedings has an identical format and consists of three parts: a list of participants, including members of the International Labour Conference's delegations, committees, and secretariat; a verbatim report of its plenary proceedings, with English interpretations where appropriate; and appendices, including the documents and reports of its committees and the conventions, recommendations, and resolutions adopted by its delegates. A significant part of the verbatim report consists of discussions of the report of the Director-General (copies of which can be found in Series 1, Subseries 3). The work of the International Labour Conference is recorded in great detail, offering insights into the dynamics and structures of the ILO as a whole. Morse's hand may be detected behind the scenes and, overtly, in his reply to the discussion of his report, but for the most part the stage belongs to others. While this subseries presents the public rather than the private face of the ILO, it represents an important reference point in any treatment of the internal workings of this organization.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by year.

Physical Description

9 boxes

28th Maritime Session: Seattle, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

30th Session: Geneva, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

31st Session: San Francisco, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

32nd Session: Geneva, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

33rd Session: Geneva, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

34th Session: Geneva, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

35th Session: Geneva, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

36th Session: Geneva, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

37th Session: Geneva, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

38th Session: Geneva, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

39th Session: Geneva, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

40th Session: Geneva, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

41st Session: Geneva, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

42nd Session: Geneva, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

43rd Session: Geneva, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

44th Session: Geneva, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

45th Session: Geneva, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

46th Session: Geneva, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

47th Session: Geneva, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

48th Session: Geneva, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

49th Session: Geneva, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

50th Session: Geneva, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

51st Session: Geneva, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

52nd Session: Geneva, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

53rd Session: Geneva, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

54th Session: Geneva, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 2: Subject Files (1895-1998) is composed of material related to the career of Morse outside of the ILO, as well as his personal life and family. Periods of his career covered by the series include his Army service, positions within the Department of Labor, and his work with the United Nations Development Programme. Please see the subseries descriptions in the contents list for additional information about individual subseries.

Arrangement

Divided into five subseries: General, Allied Military Government, Department of Labor, Mildred H. Morse, and United Nations Development Programme.

Physical Description

37 boxes

Scope and Contents

Series 2: Subject Files, Subseries 1: General (1895-1998) is the most diverse component of the Morse Papers, ranging from highly personal matters to relatively inconsequential ones and touching on innumerable aspects of Morse's life. The material in this subseries is also the broadest of any in terms of time span, for while most of it postdates the Second World War, it includes documents held by Morse's family prior to his birth. The bulk of its folders are identified by the name of the individual or organization to whom or to which their contents relate, but a number are constituted on a broader basis, as in Morse's Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts requests or in the obituaries and tributes which followed his death. Much of the material in this subseries, be it personal correspondence or organizational documents, is routine, though at various junctures an issue of particular moment manifests itself. Considered collectively, this material provides a multidimensional picture of Morse's interests and involvements. For a fuller treatment of the different phases of his life, the subseries which precede and follow this one should be consulted.

That Morse was seldom idle, even after his departure from the ILO, is readily apparent on the basis of this material. His close association with institutions and organizations such as Rutgers University, the World Rehabilitation Fund, and the Council on Foreign Relations is well-documented. So, too, are his relationships with individuals the world over. Millard Cass' folder attests to the sometimes troubled nature of Morse's ties with George Meany, the pugnacious head of the AFL-CIO, and to the broader issue underlying this tension, namely, "whether," in Morse's words, "the U. S. Government and other governments want to continue to maintain the I.L.O. as a universal organization within the framework of the United Nations family, or to reduce it to a small, tightly knit group of countries which have the objective of carrying on political warfare with the Communists."

The prevailing sentiment in this subseries, however, reflecting the tenor of Morse's life, is one of mutual respect and, frequently, affection. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis's folder, for instance, contains a note in her hand to Morse which can only be described as heartfelt. Morse's relationship with Francis Blanchard, the second man to succeed him as Director-General, is another case in point. Blanchard's folder demonstrates that Morse fulfilled the role of an eminence grise, ever ready with words of counsel and comfort. Perhaps the most arresting example of Morse's concern for others, even at one step's remove, can be found in Alain Rens's folder. Rens, the son of Morse's deputy, Jef Rens, joined the French Foreign Legion, an entanglement which he soon came to regret and which Morse went to great lengths to undo. That all was not irenic in Morse's life is evidenced by such folders as Herman Cooper's, Westbrook Pegler's, and George Shaw Wheeler's. They relate in one way or another to the anticommunist fears, sometimes justifiable and sometimes not, which gripped the United States at the height of the Cold War. Also, this subseries contains the censored photocopies of the Morse files collected by such government organizations as the FBI and CIA.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent or topic.

Physical Description

22 boxes

Abdel-Rahman, Ibrahim, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Abram, Morris, 1976-1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Acheson, Dean, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Adly, Ibrahim K, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advertising Council: Public Policy Committee, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

African-American Institute, 1993. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

African Investment Corporation, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Afros, John, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Alcock, Antony, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Alexander, Archibald S, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ali, Syed Wajid, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Altschul, Frank, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Alvarado, Luis, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Arbitration Association, 1939. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Bar Association, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Foundation on Automation and Employment, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Geographical Society, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American International Club of Geneva, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Jewish Committee, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Legion, 1948-1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Nobel Convocation, 1988. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Society of International Law, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Trade Union Council for Histadrut Dinner Honoring Morse, 1983. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ammar, Abbas, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Anderson Foundation, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Apparel Industry, 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Application for Admission to the Bar: District of Columbia, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Application for Admission to the Bar: New York State, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Arden, John Re'al, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Arms Control Association, 1971-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Asha, Rafik, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Association Internationale des Etudiants en Sciences, Economiques et Commerciales, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Association of the Bar of the City of New York, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Association of Former International Civil Servants, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Associazione "Insieme per la Pace", 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Atkins, C. Clyde, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Baldwin, Roger N, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bancroft, Harding F, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Barbeau, Charles, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bar-Niv, Zvi, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Barto, Harold E, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Batt, William Jr, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Beal, Edwin F, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Beloit College Seminar, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Benazzeddine, Mahmoud, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Benton, William, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Best, Winfield, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bilderberg Meetings, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Billikopf, Jacob, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Biographies of Morse, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Blamont, Philippe, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Blanchard, Francis, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Blum, Eric, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Blum, Jeanne Leon, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

B'nai B'rith Dinner Honoring Mason Gross, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bohr, Aage, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bolds, Clarence M, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Borlaug, Norman E, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bovier-Maurer, Stefanie, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bowles, Chester, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Boy Scouts, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Brandeis University: Honorary Degree, 1969-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bray, Charles W. III, 1984. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bristow, Philip, 1988-1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Britton, Anthony, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Brock, William E, 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Brown, Roland D, 1943. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Buiter, Harm G, 1971-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bunche, Ralph J, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Burger, Warren E, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Burr, Francis H, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Busbey, Fred, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bush, George, 1988. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bustamante, Jose L, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cambridge Conference on Development, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Candau, M. G, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Carey, James B, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Carlucci, Frank C, 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Carneiro, Barboza, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Carter, Jimmy, 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Case, Clifford P, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cass, Millard, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cass, Ronald and Pamela, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cates, John M. Jr, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Century Association, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Chandler, Geoffrey, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Chapman, Oscar L, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Churchill, Winston, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Clark, Tom, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Claudel, Francois, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cleveland, Harlan, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Clifford, Clark, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Coakley, John W, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Coat and Suit Industry, 1970-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Coblentz, Gaston, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cohen, Myer, 1967-1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cohen, Wallace M, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cohn, Sidney Elliott, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

College du Leman, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Commission for International Justice and Peace, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Commission on the Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Commission to Study the Organization of Peace, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Communism in Latin America, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Condolence Letters to Mildred H. Morse, 1990-1991. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Conference on Human Survival, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Connelly, Matthew J, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cooper, Herman, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cooperative League of the USA, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cordier, Andrew W, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cortney, Philip, 1957-1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cosmos Club, 1965-1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Coult, Satz & Tomlinson: Correspondence on Morse's Joining Firm, 1939. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Coult, Satz, Tomlinson & Morse: Partnership Agreement, 1939. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Council on Foreign Relations: Corporation Service Seminar, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Council on Foreign Relations: Correspondenc, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Council on Foreign Relations: David A. Morse Program, 1994. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Council on Foreign Relations: Field Trip to Military Installations, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Council on Foreign Relations: Study Group on U.S. Labor and the International Economy, 1977. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Cousins, Norman, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cox, Robert W, 1970-1974. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Crawford, John F, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cuomo, Mario M, 1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

D'Angelo, Armand, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Davis, William H, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

de Cuellar, Javier Perez, 1988. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

de Ferron, Olivier, 1960-1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

de Graaff, Peggy, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

de Seynes, Philippe, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

de Terra, Rhoda, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

de Villier, H. N, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Debre, Michel, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Delaney, George P, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Democratic Party Dinners, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Department of Interior: Appointment of Morse to Solicitor's Staff, 1933. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Devin, C, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Diarra, Oumar Baba, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Diouf, Abdou, 1981. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Dole, Bob, 1984. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Donato, Joseph, 1970-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Dondero, George A, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Dunlop, John T, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Durand, Jean-Pierre, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Economic Panel, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Eden, Anthony, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Eichelberger, Clark M, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

80th Birthday of Morse, 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Eisenhower, Dwight D, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Elliott, S. Michael, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ernst, Morris L, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ewing, George M, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fahy, Charles, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fascell, Dante B, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Faure, Edgar J, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fenton, Frank P, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fichter, Michael, 1978-1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fischer, Ben, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fisher, Joe, 1943. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fix, Brian D, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ford, Betty, 1986. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

40th Birthday of Morse, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Foster, William C, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Francis, John J, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Franklin D. Roosevelt Foundation, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Foundation, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Frazao, Sergio, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Correspondence with Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1980-1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Correspondence with National Security Agency, 1984. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Central Intelligence Agency, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Department of State, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1946-1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1953-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1953-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts Request: Files Released by Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1978. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Freund, Paul, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fried, John H. E, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Friedman, Elisha M, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fruchtman, Edward J, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Fulbright, J. W, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Furth, Warren W, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Galenson, Walter, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gardiner, Rita, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gardner, Richard N, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Garrison, Lloyd K, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gifts to Cultural Institutions, 1976. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gillette, Arthur C, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Goekjian, Samuel V, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Materials Viewable Online
  1. View digital content
Goldberg, Arthur J, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Goodwin, Robert C, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gordenker, Leon, 1978. 1 folder.
Scope and Contents

(Includes the transcript of an interview with Cordenker about his research and thoughts on Morse's career at I.L.O.)

Physical Description

1 folder

Gouk, Yuri, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Goulding, Valerie, 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gray, Gordon, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Green, William, 1948-1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Griswold, Erwin N, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gross, Ernest A, 1946-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gunter, R. J, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gustafson, Charles H, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Haas, Ernst B, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hammarskjold, Dag, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hansenne, Michel, 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Harbison, Frederick H, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Harriman, Averell, 1948-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Harrison, Rex, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Harvard Law School Association, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Harvard University: Gustav Pollak Lecture, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Harvard University: Program on Technology and Society, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hassouna, Abdal-Khalef, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hauck, Henri, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hayes, Wendell, 1947-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Haythorne, George V, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Heath, Ted, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Heilperin, Michael A, 1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hellman, Ted and Janice, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Helsby, Robert D, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Henry, Paul Marc, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hepler, Chester W, 1951-1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Herbert H. Lehman College, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Herrera, Felipe, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Herrick, Elinore and Family, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Herter, Christian A, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Herzog, Paul M, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Heyman, David M, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Higgins, Rev. George G, 1976. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hillpot, William, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hindle, S, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hockstader, Leonard A. and Aline S, 1943. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hodgson, James D, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hoffman, Paul G. and Anna M, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Holbrook, Richard, 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Holland, Tom, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Holmes, Allen, 1990. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Holtzmann, Howard M, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hoveyda, Fereydoun, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Humphrey, Hubert H, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Huth, Arno G, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Hylander Folk School, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Industrial Relations Research Association (New York Chapter), 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Institute on Man and Science, 1971-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Association of Students in Economics and Management, 1972-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Committee Against Mental Illness, 1971-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Court of Justice Nominations, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Drug Consortium, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Encyclopedia of Labor and Industrial Relations, 1970-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Lawyers' Club, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International League for Human Rights Conference, 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International League for the Rights of Man: Human Rights Award, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International League of Societies for the Mentally Handicapped, 1971-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Manpower Institute: Executive Seminar on Employment Growth, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Manpower Institute: Executive Seminar on Maximizing Employment, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Symposium on Public Employment Labor Relations, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Investors Overseas Services, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Isaacson, William J, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jackson, C. D, 1953-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jankowitsch, Peter, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Javits, Jacob K, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jenks, C. Wilfred, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jerusalem Film Festival, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jihad, Sami, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jimenez-Veiga, Danilo, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Joblin, Rev. Joseph, 1961-1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Johansson, Bertram B, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Johnson, Edgar A. J, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Johnson, Joseph E, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Johnson, Lyndon B, 1963-1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation: Kennedy International Award Selection Committee, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jouhaux, Leon and Schnucky, 1948-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

The Jury Study System: "A Comparison of Six- and Twelve-Member Juries in New Jersey Superior and County Courts", circa 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kaiser, Philip M, 1946-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kalb, Marvin, 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kamel, Mahmoud, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kaplansky, Kalmen, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kaufmann, Johan, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kaye, Danny, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Keenan, Joseph D, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Khan, Sadruddin Aga, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kingsley, J. Donald, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kissinger, Henry A, 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Klutznick, Philip M, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Koch, Hans Henrik, 1948-1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Koku, Simeon Olujimi, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Konvitz, Milton R, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kosciusko-Morizet, Jacques, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kotschnig, Walter, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Krag, Jens Otto, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kramer, C. Russell, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kreeger, David Lloyd, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Kreisky, Bruno, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Krug, Julius A, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

La Guardia, Fiorello, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lane, Thomas A, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lane, Tony, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lasker, Mary, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Laves, Walter H. C, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lawyer, John, 1946-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Le Roy, Rev. A, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Legion of Honor, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lehman, Edith, 1962-1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lehman, Herbert H, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Leichter, Otto, 1945. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Levin, Gerald M, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lilienthal, David E, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lindsay, John V, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lodge, Henry Cabot Jr, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lord, Winston, 1986. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lovett, Robert A, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lower Eastside Action Project, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Loyalty Data, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lubin, Isador, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lynch, John M, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

McCarthyism, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

McCormick, Charles P, 1949-1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

MacDonald, James E, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

McGrath, Marcos G, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

McGrath, W. L, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

McNamara, Robert S, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Maheu, Rene, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Major, Louis, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Marcelletti, Mario, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Marks, Herbert, 1935. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Marshall, George C, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Martin, Edwin M, 1971-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Martin, Graham, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Marx, David, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mathias, Charles McC., Jr, 1985. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mathieson, W. A. C, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mboya, Tom, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Meacham, Stewart, 1946-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Meany, George, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Meir, Golda, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Menefee, Selden, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Menzies, R. G, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Merani, S. T, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Metropolitan Club, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Michigan Law Review, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Milk Industry, 1941-1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mitchell, James P, 1957-1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Morellet, Jean, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mori, Suzanne, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Moscovitz Family, 1895. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Mouvement Anti-Apartheid de Geneve, Commission de Parrainage Scolaire, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Moynihan, Helen, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Myrddin-Evans, Guildhaume, 1948-1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nakayama, Yoshihiro, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Narasimham, C. V, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Association for Retarded Children, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Conference of Christians and Jews: Dinner Honoring Morse, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Labor Relations Board, 1939. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Lawyers Guild, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Planning Association, 1971-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National War College Seminar, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Neilan, Edwin P, 1966-1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

New Jersey Bar, 1933. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

New York State Public Employment Relations Board, 1970-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

N'Gaki, Nzo Ekan, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nixon, Richard, 1968-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Obituaries and Tributes, 1990-1998. 5 folders.
Physical Description

5 folders

O'Conor, Herbert R, 1949-1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Olav V of Norway, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1988-1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Osmay, Mukdim, 1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pachler, William J, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Parodi, Alexandre, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Passports, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pastoriza, Tomas A, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pate, Maurice, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pazhwak, R, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pegler, Westbrook, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pell, Claiborne, 1982-1983. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Penrose, E. F, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Perkins, Frances, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Perl, Frederick L, 1969-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Personal Documents, 1907-1932. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Peurifoy, John E, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Phelan, Edward J, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Phi Epsilon Pi Award, 1963-1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Piliero, Daniel J. II, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Plain Talk: Attack on Morse, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Planetary Citizens, 1975. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Plaza, Galo, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Politics, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pope John XXIII, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pope Paul VI, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pope Pius XII, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Potential Book on Morse's Years as Director-General, 1961-1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Potofsky, Jacob S, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Powers, Susan, 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Prebisch, Raul, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Princeton University Conference, 1976-1978. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Puig, Emilio Calderon, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ramos, Fernando Yllanes, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ransom, William L, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rao, Raghunath, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Reagan, Ronald W, 1981-1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Reed, Charles D, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rens, Alain, 1954-1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rens, Ivo, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rens, Jef, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rhyne, Charles S, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ribeiro da Cunha, Alexandre, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Riesel, Victor, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Robbins, Clifton, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rockefeller, David, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Roosevelt, James, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ross, Claude and J.P., 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rubin, Seymour J, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rusk, Dean, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rusk, Howard, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University, 1940. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University: Board of Trustees and Advisory Committees, 1971-1975. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University: Foundation, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University: Foundation, 1974-1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University: Honorary Degree, 1956-1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University: Memorabilia, 1929. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rutgers University: Memorabilia, 1929. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Salomon, Irving, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sanders, Paul H, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Satz, David M, 1944-1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Saver, Walter, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Schafer, Roger, 1945. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scheuer, James H, 1969-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Schweitzer, Albert: Hospital and Fellowship, 1971-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Segal, Joseph M, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Senghor, Leopold S, 1970-1975. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Senghor, Leopold S, 1976-1984. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

75th Birthday of Morse, 1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Seward, Ralph, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Shallon, Nessim, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Shanley, Bernard M, 1948-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Shaw, Charles E, 1948-1953. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Shaw, Paul F, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Shultz, George P, 1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sidney Hillman Foundation: Lecture, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sidney Hillman Foundation: Meritorious Public Service Award, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sierra, Etienne, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Singer, D. S, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Singer, H. W, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sketches of Morse, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Smith, Bob, 1944. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Snyder, Donald, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Society for International Development, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Solarz, Stephen, 1984-1985. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Somerville High School: Class of 1925 40th Reunion, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sorensen, Richard S, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Spaak, Paul-Henri, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Speaking Engagements, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

State Department, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stauffer, Thomas, 1945. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Steelman, John R, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stehlin, Mark, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stevenson, Adlai E, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stewart, Potter, 1984. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Straus, Donald B, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Straus, Nathan, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Straus, Oscar S, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Straus, Peter and Ellen, 1949-1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Straus, Roger W., Jr. and Gladys, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stryker, Steven, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sugerman, Charles, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Supreme Court Historical Society, 1975-1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Surrey, Karasik, Greene & Hill: Correspondence on Morse's Joining Firm, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Materials Viewable Online
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Surrey, Karasik & Greene: Activities in Chad and Senegal, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Surrey, Karasik & Morse: Mission of Granges Group to Iran, 1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Surrey, Walter Sterling, 1970-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Swidler, Joseph C, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Taylor, George, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Taylor, Telford, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Terence, Nsanze, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Thant, U, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Thomas, Elbert D, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Thompson, Frank Jr, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Tobin, Maurice, 1948-1951. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Todd, Joseph A, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Travelers Aid International Social Service of America, 1973-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Trimble, Phillip R, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Troclet, Leon-Eli, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Truman, Harry S, 1947-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Truman Library, 1963-1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Tubby, Roger W, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Tunney, John V, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Twigt, Bernard T, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Union Interalliee, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations: 25th Anniversary Commemoration, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Association, 1968-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Association, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Association, 1972-1974. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

United Nations Association: Economic Policy Council, 1990. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Association: Report on Foreign Policy Decision-Making, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Universite de Geneve: Honorary Degree, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Universite de Strasbourg: Honorary Degree, 1968-1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Universite Laval: Honorary Degree, 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

University of Michigan, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Urquhart, Brian, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Van Dusen, Lewis H. Jr, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Vatican, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Velebit, Vladimir, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Vincent, Patrick, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Vinci, Piero, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Vista, 1971-1972. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Vitamin-Erg Company, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wagner, Richard, 1961-1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wagner, Robert F, 1963-1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Waldheim, Kurt, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Waline, Pierre, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Watson, John Forbes, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Watt, Robert, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Weaver, George, 1965-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Weisl, Edwin L, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Werblin, David A, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Werblin, Jacob S. and Leo, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wheeler, Frederick, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wheeler, George Shaw, 1945-1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Willkie, Wendell L, 1940. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Winslow, Thacher, 1946-1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wirtz, W. Willard, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wisner, Frank G, 1984. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wolf, Francis, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Woll, Matthew, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wood, Richard, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1968-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 1976-1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Association of World Federalists, 1971-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Rehabilitation Fund: Board of Directors, 1968-1970. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

World Rehabilitation Fund: Board of Directors, 1970-1972. 5 folders.
Physical Description

5 folders

World Rehabilitation Fund: Board of Directors, 1972-1974. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

World Rehabilitation Fund: Dinner Honoring Morse, 1973-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Rehabilitation Fund: Luncheon Honoring U Thant, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Rehabilitation Fund: Vocational Rehabilitation Projects, 1969-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wou-Saofong, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wright, Ralph, 1953-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Young Presidents' Organization Inc, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Zellerbach, J. David, 1947-1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Zempel, Arnold L, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Zimmerman, William, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Zorn, Burton A, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 2: Subject Files, Subseries 2: Allied Military Government (1940-1947) documents Morse's military career during the Second World War in considerable detail. The material in this subseries includes general army records as well as records specifically related to Morse's tenure as head of the Labor Division of the Allied Military Government of Occupied Territory in Sicily and Italy and head of the Manpower Division of the United States Group Control Council for Germany. Material concerning Japan is also present in the form of the final report of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers' Advisory Committee on Labor, entitled "Labor Policies and Programs in Japan." A revealing account of Morse's wartime experiences, particularly with regards to Sicily and Italy, can be found in a journal recording his activities in various places, including North Africa, Sicily and Italy, England, France, Germany, and Austria. A haunting memento of his military career, which brought him face to face with Hitler's liberated concentration camps, is a yellow Star of David bearing the French word, "Juif."

Morse's general army records span the period from his request for an interview with the United States Army in March 1942 (subsequently he was accepted as a first lieutenant), to his receipt of the Legion of Merit in June 1946, nine months after his voluntary discharge. This material also includes selective service cards from 1940 and 1941 and the somewhat belated transmittal letter which accompanied his commission as lieutenant colonel in 1947. The general army records are mainly composed of "extracts," that is, orders and station assignments given to officers. Information issued to officers briefing them on certain codes of conduct, such as confidentiality, and detailing military activities, such as the Allied Military Government of Occupied Territory manual on "plan, proclamations and instructions" are present as well. The last folder in the general army records sequence also contains documents relating to Morse's promotion to lieutenant colonel, his receipt of the Legion of Merit for his conspicuous services, and original copies of the May 8, 1945 editions of the New York Herald Tribune and The Stars and Stripes celebrating the surrender of Germany and the end of the war in Europe. Material relating to Morse's German involvements consists mainly of reports on labor such as "Tentative Labor Plan for Germany" and "Annex XVIII (Manpower) of Basic Preliminary Plan Allied Control and Occupation of Germany (Control Council Period)." Material relating to Morse's work in Sicily and Italy is much more diverse and plentiful. It includes general orders and extracts, minutes, background documentation on Sicily and Italy's labor situations, newspaper clippings, and reports concerning various labor-related issues. The drafts of Morse's labor policy, which dealt with the abolition of the fascist labor system and the establishment free trade unions and labor offices, illustrate the evolution of civil reconstruction amid conditions which were at best unstable.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent or topic.

Physical Description

3 boxes

Army Record, 1940-1942. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Army Record, 1943-1947. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Germany, 1944-1945. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Materials Viewable Online
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Japan, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Materials Viewable Online
  1. View digital content
Journal, 1943-1945. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sicily and Italy, 1943. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Sicily and Italy, 1944. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Sicily and Italy, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Star of David, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 2: Subject Files, Subseries 3: Department of Labor (1945-1954) consists of material relating to Morse's tenure as Assistant, Under, and Acting Secretary of Labor in the Truman administration between July 1946 and August 1948. For the most part, the contents of this subseries can be divided into three broad categories: intra-departmental material, inter-departmental material, and extra-departmental material. It is important to note that most of this material takes the form of copies of records held in the National Archives rather than papers held in Morse's files. Their character tends to be impersonal, not that the human dimension is entirely absent. Morse's dealings with Secretary Lewis Schwellenbach and the upper echelons of the department convey a clear sense of the style and substance of his administrative role. The topics covered in this subseries are varied, ranging from the contentious Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, to the family budget of urban workers to the equitable participation of minorities in the programs and services of the department.

The bulk of the material in this subseries is intra-departmental, including budget reports, general orders establishing policies and procedures for various activities, draft legislation, statutes describing the purpose of departmental units, and plans for the department's 35th anniversary. This category also contains material relating to programs and services within the jurisdiction of the department such as the United States Employment Service, the Women's Bureau, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and the Veterans Employment Service. The activities of the department itself are documented in large part through reports on the progress of various domestic and international programs and through memoranda between officials suggesting changes within or alternatives to such programs.

The inter-departmental material in this subseries consists of documents exchanged between the department and other governmental offices and officials, including reports on joint programs and issues of departmental concern. For example, the Department of Labor, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Agriculture were all involved in the Food Conservation Program established by President Truman. The White House, the Department of Justice, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Atomic Energy Commission were also among the department's correspondents.

For its part, the extra-departmental material consists of correspondence and associated documents exchanged between Morse or his colleagues and external bodies such as the International Labour Organisation, the Merrill-Stevens Dry Dock and Repair Company, United States Steel, and the University of California's Institute of Industrial Relations. A number of congratulatory letters and telegrams from Morse's friends and relations on the occasion of his appointment as Assistant and Under Secretary of Labor inject an element of personal warmth into this subseries.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent or topic.

Physical Description

3 boxes

Administration, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Appointment of Morse as Assistant Secretary: Congratulations, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Appointment of Morse as Under Secretary: Congratulations, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Atomic Energy Commission, 1946-1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bailey, Dorothy: Case, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Budget, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Cass, Millard, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

City Workers, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Commerce Department, 1946-1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Confirmation of Morse as Assistant Secretary, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Congressional Correspondence, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Council of Economic Advisors, 1946-1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Economic Cooperation, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Equal Rights Amendment, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ewing, Oscar, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Food Program, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Ford, Henry II: Address on Steady Employment, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Foreign Labor Conditions, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

General Orders, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Gibson, John, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Goodwin, Robert C.: Address on Industrial Peace, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Information Policy: Fiscal Year 1949, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Interdepartmental Committees, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labor Affairs, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Organisation, 1945-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: Article on Morse, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Justice Department, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Korean Labor Report, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Labor Relations, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Legislation, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Manpower and Management, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Marine and Shipbuilding Workers' Strike Vote, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Minority Groups and Migratory Labor, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Defense, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week Committee, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Labor Management Board, 1946. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National Security Resources Board, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Nomenclature in the Executive Branch, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Post-Resignation Correspondence, 1949-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Press Releases, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Programs, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Racial Discrimination, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Schwellenbach, Lewis B, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Solicitor's Office, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

State Department, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statutes, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statutory Purpose of Department, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Taft-Hartley Act, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Telephone Strike, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

35th Anniversary of Department, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Trade Union Advisory Committee, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Treasury Department, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Truman, Harry S, 1946-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United States Employment Service, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United States Steel, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

University of California Institute of Industrial Relations, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Veterans' Employment Rights, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Wage and Price Policy, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Women's Bureau, 1947-1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 2: Subject Files, Subseries 4, Mildred H. Morse (1900-1974) consists chiefly of letters written to or from Mildred Morse, Morse's wife of 53 years, between 1919 and 1969. The broad time span of this subseries, which includes correspondence between members of Mrs. Morse's family prior to her birth as well as childhood notes, offers a rich and evolving portrait of Mrs. Morse and her world. Of particular interest in this regard is the folder relating to Mrs. Morse's presentation at the Court of St. James in 1931. She was one of a privileged circle of debutantes to appear before the British King and Queen. Among the items contained in this folder are an exchange of letters between her mother and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Nicholas Longworth, who put forward her name, and a number of effusive newspaper clippings.

The majority of the correspondence in this subseries, which is the most intimate of any in the Morse Papers, dates from the time of Morse's overseas service in the Second World War. The couple exchanged hundreds of letters during this period, often using affectionate names such as "angel duck" and "angel pie," and unique to Mrs. Morse, "Pedie" or "Peter." As Morse put it in a letter written in England in May 1944, "I've seen lots of things these last months, but never anything or anyone that even starts to resemble the beauty and quality of my adorable sweet wife. And I'm not just saying this to hear myself talk, it comes from awful way down deep." The Morses' diary-like correspondence took various forms, including postcards, densely written V-Mail, and letters, and, thanks to fairly consistent dating and, in many cases, sequential numbering, scholars can follow the couple's lines of thought and, within the limits imposed by military secrecy, lines of action on both the home and foreign fronts. This correspondence sheds light not only on the mentality of the Morses but on that of American citizens in wartime. In addition to mutual devotion, the emotions which manifest themselves include frustration -- "let's get the damned war over with" (October 1944) -- revulsion at Nazi barbarism -- "one can't afford to be too homesick when such monsters are loose in the world" (October 1944) -- and sorrow over the death of Franklin Roosevelt -- "yesterday was the saddest day that I have known since my father died" (April 1945).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Physical Description

3 boxes

Correspondence, 1919-1920. 6 folders.
Physical Description

6 folders

Correspondence, 1932-1934. 10 folders.
Physical Description

10 folders

Correspondence, 1945. 17 folders.
Physical Description

17 folders

Dependents Pass, South Plains Army Flying School, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Employment, 1943-1945. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Family Correspondence, 1900-1901. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

News Clippings, 1907. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Presentation at the Court of St. James, 1931. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 2: Subject Files, Subseries 5: United Nations Development Programme (1961-1973) consists for the most part of material Morse acquired or generated as Chairman of the United Nations Development Programme's Advisory Panel on Programme Policy, a position he held from 1970 to 1972. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is devoted to providing multilateral pre-investment aid to the world's low-income nations in an attempt to alleviate and, ultimately, eradicate global poverty. The scope of its work in Morse's time can be gauged by the number of experts serving under its auspices (8200 in 1968) and the cumulative value of its major completed and uncompleted projects ($2.8 billion by 1970). Under Morse's leadership, the Advisory Panel on Programme Policy was responsible for recommending what the position of the United Nations Development Programme should be on various issues and what policies it should pursue in the fulfillment of its mission. A fair amount of the material in this subseries relates to the internal workings of the Panel and the United Nations Development Programme as a whole. This includes such items as interoffice memoranda concerning meetings and various matters in need of discussion and resolution, reports by Panel members, such as "The Role of UNDP in Education and Training," monthly management reports, and plans for headquarters restructuring.

Present as well are preparatory documents for each of the Panel's "Sessions" consisting of various reports on "Advisory Panel Questions" to be discussed at these meetings. Topics include "The Role of the UNDP in Promoting Investment Follow-Up," "The Role of the UNDP in the Development and Adaptation of Science and Technology in Developing Countries," and "The Time-Lag Between the Identification of UNDP Projects and Their Implementation Under Project and Country Programming." Other material in this subseries includes information gathered from various seminars that Morse attended and correspondence with a number of United Nations organizations, among them the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research. A variety of nongovernmental organizations outside the United Nations system are also represented, including the AFL-CIO, the Institut Francais du Petrole, and the Society for International Development.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent or topic.

Physical Description

10 boxes

Administrative Committee on Co-ordination, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Administrative Committee on Co-ordination: Green Revolution, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Administrative Committee on Co-ordination: International Public Service Commission, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Administrator's Office, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advisory Committee on the Application of Science and Technology to Development, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advisory Panel on Programme Policy, 1970-1972. 6 folders.
Physical Description

6 folders

Advisory Panel on Programme Policy: First Session, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advisory Panel on Programme Policy: Second Session, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advisory Panel on Programme Policy: Second Session, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Advisory Panel on Programme Policy: Third Session, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Africa, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

African American Labor Center, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Agency for International Development: Employment, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

American Society for Public Administration Conference, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Appointment of Morse as Senior Consultant, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Asha, Rafik, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Aspen Institute Meeting: Asian Thought Seminar, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bellagio Group, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Brochures, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bureau for Policy Planning, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Burundi, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Canadian International Development Agency, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Colombia: Employment Project, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Contributions and Country Programming, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Correspondence: Private, 1970-1972. 4 folders.
Physical Description

4 folders

Correspondence: A-Z, 1970-1972. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Development and Resources Corporation, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Elliot, Sean M, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Employment, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Food and Agriculture Organization, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

General Committee Conference of the Cooperative Programme of Agro-Allied Industries, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Global Meeting of Resident Representatives, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Housing, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Human Environment, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Industry Cooperative Program, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Institut Francais du Petrole, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Institute on Man and Science, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Inter-Agency Consultative Board, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Inter-Country Programming, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Agricultural Research Consultative Group, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Council for Educational Development, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Organisation, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International League for the Rights of Man, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Jackson Report, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Monthly Management Reports, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

National League of Insured Savings Association, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Overseas Development Council, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Overseas Development Institute, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Personnel Policy Review Panel, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pre-Investment and Investment Follow-Up, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pre-Investment and Investment Follow-Up, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Regional Bureau for Latin America, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rehovot Conference, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Rotary Club of New York, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Society for International Development: Nominating Committee, 1972-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Society for International Development: 12th World Conference, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Staff: Headquarters Restructuring Inter Alia, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Stamford Forum for World Affairs, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

10th Anniversary Brochure, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Tidewater Meeting, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Children's Fund, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Division of Narcotic Drugs, 1970-1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Industrial Development Organization, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Industrial Development Organization/Licensing Executives Society Symposium, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Institute for Training and Research, 1970-1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Institute for Training and Research: Seminars, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

United Nations Volunteers, 1970-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

University of California: Visiting Policymakers Program, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Assembly of Youth, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Crafts Council, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

World Population Institute: Feasibility Study, 1968-1971. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

World Population Institute: Feasibility Study, 1971-1972. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

World Rehabilitation Fund, 1971-1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 3, Addresses, Writings, and Interviews (1930-1990), most neatly bound on a chronological basis, offers a remarkably comprehensive record of Morse's perspective on a wide array of subjects, as well as the views of the entities on whose behalf he wrote and spoke, over the course of 60 years. Indeed, if the transcripts of the oral history interviews in which he participated are taken into account, this series can be said to encompass within itself an entire lifetime. Most of the thousands of words recorded here were intended for public consumption, but there are also items of a personal nature, the most notable of which is a volume of intimate reflections which spans the decade between 1956 and 1966 and which touches on such matters as global peace, education, poverty, and international personalities.

The category of addresses consists of Morse's utterances between 1936 and 1990, the majority of which were made in his capacity as Director-General of the ILO. They range from his message to the Scottish Trades Union Congress in 1949 to his speech at a luncheon in honor of the Vice President of Brazil in 1956 to his talk for the Voice of America in 1962 to his lecture on the occasion of the ILO's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. Morse's visibility after his departure from the ILO is borne out by a substantial number of public utterances, the last of which, appropriately, took the form of a contribution to a panel on the organization he had once directed. Presented shortly before his death, his thoughts on the ILO are a revealing encapsulation of the story to which so large a proportion of the Morse Papers is dedicated.

The category of writings, which spans the years between 1930 and 1989, consists primarily of articles and the introductions and conclusions to the reports contained in Series 1: Subseries 3. Morse's articles range from "Industrial Peace -- At What Price?" in 1946 to "The World Situation and the I.L.O." in 1956 to "World Tragedy: More Workers than Jobs" in 1962 to "Labor in the Public Sector: An International Perspective" in 1978. His words appeared in a variety of publications, both in the United States and overseas, including the International Social Science Bulletin, The Indian Worker, the Ecumenical Review, and the Political Science Quarterly. A partial bibliography is available. In common with other public figures, Morse's writings, like his addresses, were, in many cases, drafted for him, but, as his surviving marginalia attest, he made them his own. Very much his own are the transcripts of two oral history projects to which he was a contributor after his departure from the ILO. One was conducted by Columbia University and the other by the Harry S. Truman Library, and, together, they constitute an autobiography of sorts, notable for its breadth and periodic depth and for its discursive spontaneity. The interviews commissioned by Columbia University were conducted in two stages. The first documents Morse's background, his childhood, student days, and first governmental appointments. The second carries Morse from his work as Chief Counsel for the Petroleum Labor Policy Board of the Department of Interior to his work as Director-General of the ILO, concluding with a discussion of his activities upon his return to the United States. Morse's association with the National Labor Relations Board and the Department of Labor is passed over lightly, in virtue of the extensive treatment it receives in the interviews commissioned by the Harry S. Truman Library, the focus of which, of course, is the Truman administration. Both sets of interviews commissioned by Columbia University are indexed.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Physical Description

9 boxes

Speeches, 1936-1949. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Speeches, 1949-1957. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Speeches, 1957-1962. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Speeches, 1962-1966. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Speeches, 1966-1970. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

Speeches, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Speech, Unity Club, 1938. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Speech, National Citizens Committee on Migrant Labor, 1947. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Press Conference, 1948. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Press Conference, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Employment and Economic Growth: An International Perspective", 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Arbitration vs. Strike in the Private Sector", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The Challenges Facing the United Nations and What it Means to You", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement on Receipt of Grand Officier de la Legion d'Honneur, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Comments, Global Meeting of United Nations Development Programme Resident Representatives, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"United Nations Development Programme Activities in Black Africa and the Role of U.S. Business in that Regard", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Labor Relations in the Public Sector", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Address, 34th Convention of International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Employment and Development", 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Lehman College Commencement Address, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement on Receipt of National Conference of Christians and Jews' National Brotherhood Award, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Address, Rehovoth Conference on Urbanization and the Development Process, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, 12th Session of United Nations Development Programme Inter-Agency Consultative Board, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Talk, International Manpower Institute Executive Seminar on Employment Growth, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement, Group of High-Level Experts on the Long-Range Strategy of U.N. Industrial Development Organization, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement, American Society for Public Administration National Conference Panel, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"A More Powerful Secretary-General for the United Nations?", 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, Licensing Executives Society/United Nations Industrial Development Organization Symposium, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Poor People Aren't Good Customers", 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Notes for Statement, President's Meeting of International Systems and Controls Corporation, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"On Returning to the United States After 22 Years Abroad", 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Speech, International League of Societies for the Mentally Handicapped 5th International Congress on Mental Retardation, 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Notes for Statement, Commission on the Reorganization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Development, the Path to Peace and Justice", 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Notes for Statement, International Manpower Institute Executive Seminar on Maximizing Employment, 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement, Tribute Dinner in Morse's Honor Benefiting the World Rehabilitation Fund, 1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"World on the Move", 1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Legal Aspects of Romanian-U.S. Contracts", 1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, Annual Convention of United Steelworkers of America, 1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Notes for Remarks, Meeting of General Partnership, Arthur Andersen & Company, 1975. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, 20th Anniversary of World Rehabilitation Fund, 1976. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The United Nations Faces World Problems: American Labor's Stake in an Interdependent World", 1976. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Monitoring of Equal Employment Opportunity Provisions of Construction Contracts of Columbia University - NY City", 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Executive Leadership at the International Level", 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Address, 36th Convention of International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Comments, Symposium on the Role of the United States in Specialized International Organizations, 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Trade and Cooperation", 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Labor in the Public Sector: An International Perspective", 1978. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Comparison of Dispute Resolution Techniques Between International Relations and Labor Relations", 1978. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Eulogy, Services for Mrs. David M. Heyman, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement, Conference on the Economic Policies of the Truman Administration, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Speech, International Association of Personnel in Employment Security, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Statement, Dedication of Heyman Center for the Humanities, 1981. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Legal Ramifications for Romanian Enterprises of Various Forms of Doing Business in the U.S.", 1981. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, 75th Birthday Party, 1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, Luncheon in Morse's Honor Tendered by Romanian Ambassador to the United States, 1982. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Introduction of Congressman Silvio O. Conte on the Occasion of the Second Paul G. Hoffman Lecture, 1983. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Remarks, Marketing Meeting of Philip Morris International, 1983. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Draft Notes, Foreign Service Institute Symposium on American Labor Diplomacy, 1986. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Notes, Talk to Summer Associates in Washington, D.C. Office of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, 1986. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Comments, ILO Panel Meeting, 1990. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Opening Remarks on International Dispute-Settlement, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The Unique Role of Switzerland in World Peacemaking", undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Bibliography of Articles, 1948-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Articles, 1930-1957. 2 folders.
Physical Description

2 folders

Articles, 1957-1970. 3 folders.
Physical Description

3 folders

"Ama Reflects", 1938. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"War and Peace: The Circle", 1944. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Reflections, 1956-1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"The Institute: Its Position and Purpose", 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Unemployment in Developing Countries", 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Man's Vision", 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Shrinking Planet", 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Development: An Enduring Issue", 1972. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Unemployment: Bitter Burden of Millions in South America", 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Joint Investment Opportunities with the Socialist Republic of Romania", 1973. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Labor in the Public Sector: An International Perspective", 1978. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Executive Leadership at the International Level", 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"One Global Economy", 1987. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"A Rendezvous with History", 1989. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Preface, Book on the Role of Women in the International Labour Organisation, undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"We Live in Only One World", undated. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oral History Interviews, Columbia University, 1971. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oral History Interviews, Columbia University, 1980-1981. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oral History Interviews, Harry S. Truman Library, 1977. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 4, Appointment Books (1949-1970) consists of 22 small, bound, yearly planners in which Morse periodically jotted down his daily schedule as Director-General. Although a large percentage of days are blank slates, the pages on which Morse noted his appointments are informative and provide an insight, albeit skeletal, into what his life as head of the ILO was like. On March 2, 1953, for instance, his day began with a meeting followed by five appointments, including one with Egypt's Under Secretary of Labor, followed by another meeting followed by a dinner. On May 14, 1959, seven appointments are recorded, as well as a meeting, a lunch, a reception, and a dinner. During the annual International Labour Conference his schedule could be more crowded still.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Physical Description

2 boxes

Appointment Books, 1949-1961. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Appointment Books, 1962-1970. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scope and Contents

Series 5, Scrapbooks (1922-1962) is largely composed of newspaper clippings, some collected by Morse and other gathered by his staff. There are a number of gaps, and the years which are represented suffer from uneven coverage. In certain cases a large and often repetitive collection of clippings was assembled, while in others there is almost nothing to document Morse's myriad activities. Of particular interest are the first two scrapbooks in this series, for, between them, they cover Morse's youth and prewar adulthood, a period poorly represented elsewhere. Morse's love of football is much in evidence, but so, too, are his oratorical gifts. In 1927 he won a place or, rather, a rostrum at the National Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest in Los Angeles. He finished sixth, and it is interesting to note that, in his address, he argued that "reverence of the law should rightly become the political religion of the nation," a theme he would return to in the future when far greater issues than collegiate pride would be at stake. The newspaper clippings which document Morse's prewar governmental work range from the "local boy makes good" variety of news to substantial articles, most of which relate to Morse's work as Regional Attorney for the Second Region of the National Labor Relations Board. The highly-charged atmosphere of many of the hearings at which Morse, acting under the aegis of the controversial Wagner-Connery Act, appeared is almost palpable. Later scrapbooks chart Morse's postwar career, often in multilingual form, touching on both the pivotal moments, such as his appointment as Assistant Secretary of Labor and his election as Director-General of the ILO, and the multitude of small events which, together, formed the fabric of his public life: his membership in President Truman's "brain trust," which met each Monday at the Wardman Park Hotel; his tour of South America, which he found to be in the grip of an "industrialization fever," in 1949; his plan to facilitate the movement of hundreds of thousands of Europeans to countries in need of manpower; and his inauguration of the United Nations pavilion in Brussels in 1958, to mention a few such moments.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Physical Description

10 boxes

Scrapbook, 1922-1929. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1931-1939. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1945-1948. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1948-1950. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1949-1951. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1951-1952. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1951-1954. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1954-1958. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1961. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scrapbook, 1962. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Scope and Contents

Series 6, Memorabilia (1946-1993) consists of medals, certificates, plaques, keys to cities, pins, ribbons, coins, and eight oversized documents. The material in this series was given to Morse in commemoration of various significant events in his career from governments and organizations throughout the world. The materials honor Morse for his work with ILO, as well as other aspects of his career, and commemorate his visits to other countries and important anniversaries of organizations. The oversize documents include certificates testifying to Morse's appointment as Assistant and Under Secretary of Labor and his designation as the representative of the government of the United States on the Governing Body of the ILO. Also to be found are welcoming addresses presented to him on a visit to India and Pakistan as well as attractively illuminated messages of appreciation on the occasion of his departure from the ILO. Please note that the oversized documents are housed in the oversized cabinets.

Arrangement

Arranged by form.

Physical Description

4 boxes

Certificates and Addresses, 1946-1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Honors and Mementos, 1962-1993. 4 boxes.
Physical Description

4 boxes

Scope and Contents

Series 7, Audiovisual Material (1958-1991) consists of phonograph records, audiotapes, including three cassette tapes, and a 16mm film featuring Morse and events of which he was a part or in which he took an interest. While a number of speakers are represented in this material, among them Pope Paul VI in conjunction with his visits to New York and Geneva, Morse's voice is predominant. His words were recorded in a variety of settings and addressed to a variety of audiences, including the International Labour Conference, the Governing Body, and the staff of the International Labour Office. For the most part, the recordings in this series can be found in textual form elsewhere, notably in the proceedings of the International Labour Conference, but, however clear, the printed word lacks the emotional value of the spoken. Herein lies the principal strength of this series. Morse's speech to the International Labour Conference in 1963 in the midst of a furor over South Africa's participation is a case in point. His advocacy of constitutional over arbitrary methods, important though the issue at stake may be, is compelling, as is his declaration that "I need no lessons on racial discrimination. Revealing too, is his speech to the Governing Body in 1961 in which he announced his short-lived resignation as Director-General. The internal struggle which this decision entailed is apparent.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Physical Description

3 boxes

"Capitol Cloakroom", 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Declaration en Francais de M.D. Morse", 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (43rd Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (43rd Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

40th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation: Celebratory Dinner, Washington, D.C., 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

40th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation: Celebratory Dinner, Washington, D.C., 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

40th Anniversary of International Labour Organisation: Celebratory Dinner, Washington, D.C., 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (44th Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (45th Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (45th Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Resignation of Morse as Director-General: Meeting of Governing Body, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (46th Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (46th Session): Morse's Reply to Discussion of His Report, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Talk to the Staff of the International Labour Office, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

International Labour Conference (47th Session): Speech on South African Question, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Talk to the Staff of the International Labour Office, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pope Paul VI's Visit to New York: Excerpts (Including Address to United Nations), 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Pope Paul VI's Visit to Geneva: Excerpts (Including Address to International Labour Organisation), 1969. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

"Work and Peace: The International Labour Organisation Begins its Second Half-Century", 1963. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Election of Morse as Director-General: Meeting of Governing Body, 1962. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Press Conference, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Speech to World Assembly of Youth, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Staff Farewell, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Retirement of Morse as Director-General: Governing Body Farewell, 1970. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Presentation of Portrait to International Labour Office, 1979. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Funeral Service for Morse, 1990. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Memorial Service for Morse, 1991. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Miscellaneous Addresses, 1959-1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Miscellaneous Addresses, 1961-1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

Series 8, Photographs (1920-1990, undated) consists of hundreds of predominantly black and white photographs of varying size which chronicle both private and public aspects of the lives of David and Mildred Morse. The former category includes many photographs of the couple's families and is weighted towards the period of their youth. Mrs. Morse's early years are far better documented than her husband's, though Morse's passion for football in school and in university is captured in several photographs. The gracious life of a debutante is illustrated in a number of Mrs. Morse's photographs, the most notable of which are those which were taken on the occasion of her presentation at the Court of St. James in 1931. The harsh realities of war intrude as well, however. In a particularly evocative photograph, Mrs. Morse can be seen pointing to a map of Europe, her husband's theater of operations. This category also includes a number of photographs taken in the Morses' mature years, which underscore their enduring attachment to one another.

The great majority of photographs in this series relate to the Morses' public activities, of which there were many. In this instance, Morse is a more ubiquitous presence than his wife, though her active interest in his work, to say nothing of the demands of protocol, are evidenced by her recurring appearance. This category encompasses each phase of Morse's career with the exception of his prewar activities, which are virtually unrepresented. Morse's stint at the South Plains Army Flying School in Lubbock, Texas accounts for most of his wartime photographs; there is a sizeable sampling of photographs dating from his years in the Department of Labor, including an autographed portrait of Secretary of Labor Lewis Schwellenbach; and the active life he led on leaving the ILO is well-documented. Among the latter photographs are a number featuring Morse and various statesmen, including Javier Perez de Cuellar, Secretary-General of the United Nations, Presidents Jimmy Carter and George Bush, President Carlos Menem of Argentina, President Mario Soares of Portugal, and Prime Minister Turgut Ozal of Turkey.

Not unexpectedly, Morse's years at the ILO yielded a large body of photographs. They offer glimpses into the multifaceted duties of a Director-General, including the endless round of meetings, receptions, assemblies, and ceremonies in which the incumbent is expected to take part. Two events of an uncommon nature are abundantly represented: Pope Paul VI's visit to the headquarters of the ILO and the conferral on the ILO of the Nobel Peace Prize. International travel is another duty of Directors-General, and, as the photographs relating to the ILO attest, Morse logged countless miles. Photographs taken in the course of his numerous missions are subdivided on the basis of country and, in the case of the superpowers, on the basis of leader as well. Indeed, these photographs constitute something of a visual who's who of the world's politicians between 1948 and 1970. While there are many gaps, the gallery includes Presidents Truman through Johnson as well as such men as Nikita Khrushchev and Leonid Brezhnev of the Soviet Union, Arturo Frondizi of Argentina, Antonin Novotny of Czechoslovakia, Gamal Nasser of Egypt, Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, Jawaharlal Nehru of India, and Josip Tito of Yugoslavia. It should be noted in closing that a significant number of the photographs in this series are undated and, in many instances, are at least partly unidentified.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by topic.

Physical Description

13 boxes

Missions of Director-General: Algeria, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Argentina, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Brazil, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Bulgaria, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Burma, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Cameroon, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Chile, 1961. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Congo (Kinshasa), 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Cyprus, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Czechoslovakia, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Czechoslovakia, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Czechoslovakia, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Egypt, 1953-1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Egypt, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Egypt, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Ethiopia, 1964. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Ethiopia, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Gabon, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Greece, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: India, 1949-1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: India, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: India, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Iraq, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Israel, 1954. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Israel, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Israel, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Italy, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Japan, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Kuwait, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Mali, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Morocco, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: The Netherlands, 1950. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Nigeria, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Norway, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Pakistan, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: The Philippines, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Poland, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Portugal, 1960. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Republic of China, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Soviet Union, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Soviet Union, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Spain, 1956. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Spain, 1965. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Sweden, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Thailand, 1968. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Turkey, 1955. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Venezuela, 1967. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Yugoslavia, 1952. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Yugoslavia, 1959. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Meeting with Leonid Brezhnev, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Meeting with Dwight Eisenhower, 1957. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Meeting with Lyndon Johnson, 1966. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Meeting with John Kennedy, 1963. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Meeting with Nikita Khrushchev, 1958. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Missions of Director-General: Meeting with Harry Truman, 1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Panoramas, 1932. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Private Life: David Morse, 1934. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Private Life: Mildred Morse, 1920. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Private Life: David and Mildred Morse, 1938. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Public Life: Pre-International Labour Office, circa 1939. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Public Life: International Labour Office, 1948-1955. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Public Life: International Labour Office, 1963-1970. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Public Life: International Labour Office, undated. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Public Life: International Labour Office, undated. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Public Life: Post-International Labour Office, 1970-1973. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Oversize: Private Life: David Morse, 1922. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oversize: Private Life: David Morse (painted portrait), Undated. 1 item.
Physical Description

1 item

Oversize: Private Life: Mildred Morse, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oversize: Private Life: David and Mildred Morse, 1942. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oversize: Public Life: Pre-International Labour Office, 1937. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oversize: Public Life: International Labour Office, 1948-1949. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Oversize: Public Life: Post-International Labour Office, 1971-1974. 1 folder.
Physical Description

1 folder

Scope and Contents

This series consists of the records received in the March 2011 accession and includes CVs, memorial tributes, services, and programs, obituary notices, and Labor Hall of Fame program materials.

Arrangement

The materials in this series are maintained in the order in which they were received at Princeton.

Physical Description

2 boxes

ILO Geneva Tribute to David A. Morse, 1991-1997. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse - C.V.'s, circa 1987. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse Geneva Event, 1998 March 18. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

ILO Nobel Peace Prize Fund, 1991-1993. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Council on Foreign Relations David A. Morse Program, 1993-2000. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse Memorial Fund African-American Institute, 1991-2000. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Department of Labor Hall of Fame (Invitation List), 1997-1998. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse Memorial Fund - Rutgers, 1990-1998. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Council on Foreign Relations David A. Morse Project, 1992-1998. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Labor Hall of Fame Program Materials and Electronic Records, 1998. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Materials Viewable Online
  1. View digital content
David A. Morse Memorial Service, 1990-1991. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse Obituaries and News Clippings, 1990. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Instructions for Burial and Memorial Services, 1988-1990. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Council on Foreign Relations David A. Morse Program 5/8/97, 1994-1997. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Princeton Papers - David A. Morse, 1992-2003. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse Memorial Tributes, 1990-1994. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

David A. Morse Princeton Papers - Opening of Exhibition - 10/15/95, 1995. 1 box.
Physical Description

1 box

Print, Suggest