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Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia Exhibits Department records

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Held at: Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia [Contact Us]1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA, 19103

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in their reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

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A Brief History of the Education and Exhibits Departments at the Academy of Natural Sciences, prepared by Barbara Ceiga, Vice President of Public Operations

“To see that our scientific work is shared with the public in ways that instruct and entertain is one of our direct responsibilities, for knowledge of Nature not only widens the mental horizon, but helps to ease the common burdens of life.”

Charles M.B. Cadwalader Report of the Managing Director of the Museum, 1929

Before 1935: Lectures and Taxidermy Prior to the 1930s, the Academy of Natural Sciences had neither an education department nor an exhibits department.

Education programs were the responsibility of the Committee on Lectures and Instructions and consisted of free public lectures that were offered on a weekly basis. These lectures, although held at the Academy, were presented and underwritten by the Ludwick Institute, a charitable organization founded by Christopher Ludwick in 1799.

Exhibit-related activities were limited to the output of a single taxidermist, one Mr. David McCadden, who served under the various curators. Mr. McCadden joined the Academy around 1892 and remained its taxidermist through the 1940s.

In 1920, Harold T. Green came to work at the Academy. At first, he was in charge of arranging the public lectures funded by the Ludwick Institute. However, within a year he was also “superintending” exhibits. His skills as a taxidermist and artist soon overtook his role as a program coordinator and, in 1930 his title was officially changed to “Curator of Museum Exhibits.”

In 1929, Green created his first habitat group, or “diorama.” It depicted a group of rocky mountain goats and was installed in the location currently occupied by the Eastern Pennsylvania dioramas in North American Hall. Many Academy curators strongly opposed this new-fangled approach to displaying plant and animal specimens in a lifelike setting. Building dioramas was a costly undertaking and diverted funds from research activities. Also, to some curators, the notion of “recreating nature” constituted fakery and pandering to the public. It was no substitute for the time-honored tradition of displaying row upon row of static mounted specimens in phylogenetic order.

Ironically, it was the Great Depression that provided an unexpected boost that enabled dioramas to flourish at the Academy. Very wealthy patrons who were largely unaffected by the economic hardships of the day continued to go on safari, but in the 1930s they began bagging big game in the name of education—a charitable excuse for pursuing an expensive hobby. A second boost came in 1935, when the Works Progress Administration began supplying the Academy with skilled artists. Between the wealthy sportsmen-patrons and the ambitious Curator of Exhibits, these artists were kept busy painting scenic backgrounds, building models, and lending their talents to the creation of the dioramas.

1936: Setting a Course for Education In preparation of the Academy’s 125th anniversary in 1937, a committee made up of museum trustees and administrators, leading educators, and “prominent Philadelphians” undertook the creation of an Educational Development Program. Adopted on May 25, 1936, it outlined a long-range plan for the future growth of the Academy. Its objectives were: 1. To strengthen the scientific work of the Academy, and to provide for its growth. 2. To inaugurate an Educational Department that would make the Academy a vital part of the public and private school system of Philadelphia. 3. To create a dramatic and vital museum of natural history with modern educational exhibits that would instruct and interest young and old alike. 4. To re-establish the Academy’s Department of Geology and Paleontology that would provide a world center for research and teaching on the origins of Early Man.

The committee set a goal of raising nearly $380,000 to fund a five-year demonstration period for implementing their objectives. Although the center for the study of Early Man was short-lived, both the Education Department and Exhibits Departments thrived during the demonstration period, and have continued to promote the public education mission of the Academy to the present day.

1936-1945: Lessons and Dioramas Education Department In 1936, the Academy appointed W. Stephen Thomas Director of Education. Among his first tasks was to send out 1600 surveys to Philadelphia school teachers asking them for suggestions as to what kinds of educational support they would like to receive from the Academy. Topping the list were requests for lending materials—specifically natural history specimens—for use in the classroom, and natural history lessons for school children at the Academy.

By the following year, Thomas had developed six lessons, covering paleontology, geology, mineralogy, local mammals, birds, and insects. The lessons consisted of classroom instruction followed by visits to the museum galleries that related to the lesson’s theme. Thomas taught most of the lessons himself, assisted by one instructor.

In 1938, Thomas added four more offerings to the Education Department’s roster. • In January, the Junior Explorers Club welcomed boys and girls to the Academy on alternating Saturday mornings to meet with explorers and develop their interests in nature studies. • Also in January, Demonstration Classes began traveling to hospitals, orphanages, and homes for disabled children. These early outreach programs brought portable versions of a natural history museum to those who were unable to come to the museum themselves. • In April, a Nature Study Course was initiated. Thirty-two men and women, most of them scout leaders and directors of camps and recreation centers, attended eight evening courses that instructed them on how to incorporate nature study into their programs. • In July, summer programs for “stay-at-home” Philadelphians were offered. These include free lectures, guided tours of the museum galleries for camp groups, and expeditions for adults to local parks. The last of these programs proved so popular, they were extended beyond the summer months as “Fall Field Trips.”

The following year, Thomas left the Academy to become the Executive Secretary of the Committee on Education and Participation of the Sciences at the American Philosophical Society. He was replaced by Charles Mohr, who continued to expand the educational offerings of the Academy. The popular field trip program was renamed “Expeditions for Everyone” and ran year-round. By the following year, a nature garden was planted along the 19th Street side of the museum so that urban children could encounter local plants, terrariums were established and used in programs, and a summer camp was initiated.

Although the war had a great impact on the Academy as a whole, the Education Department was largely unaffected. Able to retain its entire staff, it continued to offer a full roster of programs for adults and children throughout the war years.

Exhibits Department In the Exhibits Department, Harold Green continued his quest to fill the museum galleries with dioramas. The North American Hall was nearly complete, the Asian Hall was coming along, and now the African groups were taking shape.

In addition to his devotion to dioramas, Green had become interested in another new style of museum exhibit. In 1936, he had traveled to Europe to find out what the latest trends in their museums were. He was especially taken by the technology-based “teaching exhibits” that he saw in Germany. Upon his return, he began incorporating these techniques into his work at the Academy.

In 1937, the Hall of Early Man was installed in the first floor of the Race Street building (currently Dinosaur Hall). It included very few specimens and was not organized along traditional themes of taxonomy or chronology. Instead, it featured diagrammatic representations, abstract models, and a recreation of a dig site where bones of early man and mammoths had been uncovered. Dramatically lit facsimiles of cave paintings helped complete the effect.

The following year, Green began experimenting with technology-based exhibits. He transformed the Hall of Early Man into the Hall of Earth History, which featured an interactive display of fluorescent minerals and a visitor-activated radium detector that was displayed next to a collection of radioactive minerals and clicked away at the press of a button.

In 1939, the Academy had its first truly interactive exhibit in the form of an “electronic quiz” that tested visitors’ knowledge of minerals. A little light glowed when visitors correctly identified minerals on display. That same year, a Hall of New Exhibits was established and featured temporary displays organized around a specific theme. Many of these themes were influenced by the war. A 1943 display of birds that use camouflage to escape predators was called “Victory.” An exhibit entitled “The Raw Materials of the Atomic Bomb” ran for several months in 1945.

During the war years, the work of the Exhibits Department slowed considerably. Two of its five members, including Harold Green, were called to active duty from 1942 to 1945. No new habitat groups were executed during Green’s absence.

In 1942, the remaining exhibits crew managed to open the Audubon Hall of Birds, which occupied much of the third floor of the museum. It featured traditional cases of birds mounted in taxonomic order, but displayed against background paintings depicting a generalized version of their habitat, e.g., seashore, grassland, woodland, etc.

1946-1956: An Educational Powerhouse Education Department In 1947, Charles Mohr left the Academy to work for the Audubon Nature Center in Greenwich, CT. He was replaced by James Fowler, an avid amateur herpetologist who became a research associate with the Academy’s Department of Amphibians and Reptiles.

Over the next ten years, Fowler dramatically strengthened and expanded the department’s offerings. Like his predecessors, he organized the annual Ludwick Lectures, and ran the informal nature programs for adults and children. He also enhanced the Academy’s relationship with the Philadelphia school system, improved the quality of all the public programs, and popularized the local field trips called “Expeditions for Everyone.”

In 1951, the department began offering its first fee-based educational programs in the form of ten-week adult natural history courses. The fee was $10 for non-members, $7.50 for members. Like the other educational offerings, these proved to be highly successful. Soon, the general natural history curriculum was joined by a special lapidary class, in which students learned to collect, identify, and polish rocks and minerals.

Exhibits Department Upon returning to the Academy from his military service in Burma, Harold Green wasted no time in focusing his attention back on his beloved dioramas. The last of the North American Hall dioramas (Sonoran Desert) was completed in 1947, followed by the Wild Yak and Kiang in the Asian Hall. These Asian dioramas were somewhat of a tribute to Brooke Dolan, an Academy trustee who had collected the specimens prior to the war, and was killed in action while trying to rescue a bomber crew that had been shot down over China. By 1957, all of the major dioramas at the Academy were completed.

Green also made several more large-scale expeditions, accompanying patrons as they collected specimens for exhibits and research.

In 1947, the Limnology Department was established at the Academy, opening a new era in scientific research. The focus on environmental science, especially pertaining to freshwater systems, was soon being incorporated into exhibits throughout the museum.

In 1951, the Academy opened two new exhibits that illustrated a ground shift taking place in science museums around the country. The Hall of Philadelphia Birds (the remnants of which can be seen in Bird Classroom) was executed in a traditional style, featuring dioramas of birds in their natural habitats and cases of taxidermy mounts arranged in taxonomic order. However, the River Valley Hall (located on the south mezzanine above today’s Dinosaur Hall) featured no specimens at all, but instead used scale models and diagrammatic graphics to tell the story of the Delaware River, from its headwaters to its mouth.

The following year, the Academy hosted its first traveling exhibit. Called “Stories in Hair and Fur” and organized by the Cranbrook Institute, it comprised 30 panels providing “much enlightening information on the commercial treatment and uses of fur and hair.” This was followed by more traveling shows, ranging from a display of replicas of the crown jewels of England to installations of paintings and photographs, some of which had little to do with natural history.

In addition to developing new exhibits and hosting traveling ones, the Exhibits Department began to focus its attention on “modernization and improvement” throughout the museum. The Hall of Minerals was remodeled, the Eastern Pennsylvania dioramas were installed, and in 1955, a Dinosaur Ball was held to raise funds for a new dinosaur exhibit. Up until this time, the only dinosaur the Academy ever had on display was the 1868 plaster mount of Hadrosaurus foulkii, which was retired in the 1930s due to its deteriorating condition.

Admission Fees In 1953, the Academy began charging an admission fee for museum visitors. Adults were 50 cents, children 25 cents, and non-Philadelphia school groups 20 cents per person. Members and Philadelphia school groups were free. The Academy was the last of the city’s major museums to charge admission fees.

1956-1964: Popularizing the Museum Education Department In 1957, the Education Department suffered a blow when its tireless director, James Fowler, left to take a position at the Cranbrook Institute. For the next two years, an interim director took the reins while administrators searched for a new department head. In 1959, they selected Ray Howe, who held a master’s degree in education. He began instituting changes almost immediately: the Saturday morning nature film and lecture series was extended to take place every weekend, a story hour was held every Thursday, a monthly “Family Adventures” program was initiated, and the highly popular “Expeditions for Everyone” were made members-only programs. The expeditions quickly waned, and were even discontinued for a short time. But within a few years, they were revived and regained their popularity.

Howe also began a new members-only lecture series featuring “distinguished scientists.” These occasional programs included presentations by Joy Adamson of “Born Free” fame and Louis B. Leaky. The lectures were invitation-only affairs, open to upper level membership holders.

In 1962, the Education Department piloted a new roster of museum lessons. Twenty different one-hour study units for K-12 were offered, not in classroom settings, but in the exhibit galleries themselves. Areas used for lessons were closed off and visitors were kept out in order that classes could take place uninterrupted. According to Howe, this helped to convey “the image of the museum as a place of quiet study.”

Also in 1962, the Education Department began showing full-length films in the lecture hall. At first, the films were nature-related, then science-related, and then not related to science at all. The 1963 roster included “You Can’t Take It With You” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Overall, 1962 was a banner year for the Academy. It celebrated its 150th anniversary and, for the first time in its history, attendance topped 200,000 visitors. Unfortunately, the following year, general attendance began a steady decline that would continue for quite some time.

Exhibits Department With no more dioramas on its docket, the Exhibits Department turned its attention to developing other kinds of exhibits that would attract visitors to the museum.

In 1956, Green designed and constructed a live animal house in the Academy’s courtyard to house a collection of about 20 small animals. His hope was to provide an “occasional interjection of a live animal” into the exhibit galleries. Soon after, he installed a series of live fish aquariums in an alcove in Asia Hall.

In April of 1957, the Academy unveiled the skeleton of Corythosaurus—its first mounted dinosaur since Hadrosaurus foulkii had been dismantled in the 1930s. The nearly complete skeleton of Corythosaurus had been excavated in 1927 by the famous fossil-collecting Sternberg family. They traded it to the Carnegie Museum, who traded it with the Denver Museum, who sold it to the Academy in 1954 for $2000. At the time, the Academy had neither a vertebrate paleontologist nor a fossil preparator on staff, so the bones were shipped up to the American Museum of Natural History for mounting. Installed in the Hall of Earth Sciences, Corythosaurus remained the only dinosaur skeleton on display for the next 30 years.

In 1958, the department began offering “Wild Animal Shows” on weekends. These shows, conducted by newly hired demonstrators, were conducted first in the exhibit galleries, and later in the Lecture Hall. They proved to be very popular and were expanded to daily performances the following year. The animal collection began changing from small, hand-carried animals to large, showy ones and soon included a miniature donkey, wallaby, red wolf, coyote, woolly, and puma. The puma lasted less than a year before she became too difficult to handle and was sent to a zoo. Each hour-long show featured five or six animals, each of which sat on a pedestal until it was called upon by the demonstrator.

In 1960, the River Valley Hall, which had been installed nine year earlier, was made smaller to make room for the “Junior Museum,” a project spearheaded by the Junior League and members of the Academy’s Women’s Committee. This highly popular hands-on children’s nature museum was the precursor to today’s “Outside In” exhibit.

Over the next several years, live animal displays began popping up throughout the museum, exhibited alongside their taxidermied relations. Live lovebirds appeared in Bird Hall and pythons in Asian Hall.

With exhibit-building on the wane, and live animal demonstrations on the rise, Harold Green was appointed Chairman of Live Natural History. In 1962, Robert Barnes was hired as the new head of the Exhibits Department. A sculptor and bronze caster by training, his mandate was not to create new exhibits, but to assist the Academy’s administration in drawing up plans for a new building on the Delaware waterfront.

1964-1975: Flux In 1964, Robert Barnes resigned from his position as head of the Exhibits Department. Shortly after, Ray Howe also resigned from his position as head of the Education Department. In 1965, the Academy decided to merge the two departments into one and hired Gilbert Merrill from the Science Museum of Boston to head the newly combined department. In just five years, the group would grow from 14 to 23, and all but three of the original 14 staffers would remain. Merrill himself had moved on in less than two years.

It was around 1968 that the term “museum” began to be used to describe only the public aspect of the Academy—a semantic differentiation that continues to this day and causes much confusion on the part of both the staff and public. It was also at this time that the live animal group became part of the Education Unit. For a short while the security officers were also organized under the auspices of the Education Unit.

By the end of the decade, things had come full circle. Education and Exhibits were split into two separate departments once again; while Security was combined with Admissions to make a third department. However, during this time, Exhibits had shrunk from seven to five members, while Education had grown from seven to 18 members, eight of whom were devoted to maintaining the live animal collection.

By this time, live animals had become the main focus of many educational programs. The collection had expanded to more than 70 animals, and kept an ever-growing staff of full-timers busy. In addition to the paid staff, a corps of dedicated volunteers, known as the “snake ladies,” kept busy giving live animal demonstrations in the museum, while a second group, the “roadrunners,” carried live animals to hospitals, rehab centers, and nursing homes.

In the mid-1960s, Philadelphia was on the road to becoming a city in economic decline, and the Academy’s educators were faced with the ever-increasing challenge of serving two very different audiences with two very different sets of needs. For the local natural history enthusiast (the Academy’s traditional audience, now in rapid decline), they continued to offer the traditional roster of lectures, films, and outings, and even added a couple of new programs. The Seminar for Outdoorsmen presented “timely information about nearby places of natural history interest.” And the Maine Island Ecology Program, (begun in 1970) offered high school students the opportunity to explore the ecosystem of a coastal island in near Acadia National Park. For the underserved inner-city youth (an audience on the rise), they began developing more and more programs, thanks in large part to funding from a variety of government-sponsored anti-poverty initiatives.

1975-1985: The Youth Movement Takes Hold The administration of the Education and Exhibits Departments once again was in flux during this time period. Up until 1981, Dennis Wint (now President and CEO of The Franklin) served as Vice President and oversaw the two departments. Under his direction, the focus of both educational programs and exhibits continued to become more focused on the youth audience.

After Wint’s departure in 1981, Robert Peck served for a short time as the Vice President for the Museum. After that, the position was retired and Exhibits and Education became part of the division of Finance and Administration.

Education Department Throughout this period, the Education Department was under the direction of Russell Daws, a biologist by training and an enthusiastic science educator. Photographs from this period show Daws engaged in all types of programs, from children’s workshops to adult lectures to local field trips.

By the mid-1970s the Education Department was focusing much of its attention on the youth audience, particularly students enrolled in the Philadelphia public school system.

In 1977, the Academy began hosting the annual Carver Science Fair for grades 4-12. Over the next few years, the program spun off several other “Carver” events, including a week-long Summer Scholars program, Science Teachers’ Workshop, and a Science Symposium for students and teachers.

The department also launched a variety of grant- and government-funded programs designed to reach “disadvantaged” children, including • “WINS,” a two-year program targeted at 9th- and 10th-grade girls from single-parent homes • “Potentials,” an eight-week summer science program for inner-city high school students • Ludwick Field Trips, four Academy-guided day-long trips for disadvantaged city youth • “Motivation,” a Philadelphia School District program that brings live animals to neighborhood schools and sponsors two six-week Saturday workshops for college-bound disadvantaged high school seniors • “Museum Pacs,” sets of natural materials to be sent to inner city schools

To better accommodate the growing audience of youth groups, the Academy opened the Widener Education Center in 1982. Located on the lower level of the former Lecture Hall (which had been replaced with the current Auditorium in 1978), the Center included two large classrooms that could be reconfigured into four smaller classrooms when needed.

The Education Department continued to organize the Explorer lecture series and the Expeditions for Everyone, which were held nearly every weekend year-round. However, the emphasis on youth programs was stretching the department rather thin and, in the early 1980s, a volunteer member of the Women’s Committee, Caryl Wolf, took over organizing adult classes and workshop, using Academy scientists as program leaders.

Exhibits Department Unlike the Education Department, Exhibits experienced difficulty retaining a director for any length of time during this period. The position changed hands at least four times, resulting in loss of continuity or clear direction.

In 1975, Portia Sperr, a Montessori teacher, approached the Academy with a proposal: If the Academy would let her use a small space within the museum, she would run a hands-on learning gallery for children under seven. Inspired by the work of Michael Spock at the Boston Children’s Museum, Sperr was an enthusiastic supporter of play-based learning. Despite some reservations on the part of the curators, the Academy accepted Sperr’s proposal and the following year the “Please Touch” exhibit opened in a corner of Dinosaur Hall (what is now the Darwin Room).

Please Touch proved to be very popular and was soon spilling out of its small confines. After a brief period of territorial disputes and revenue-sharing requests, it was clear that Please Touch needed more room than the Academy could spare. In 1978, it moved to a location on 21st and Cherry. However, its brief stay at the Academy had made a lasting impression. The following year, the Academy had replaced the space previously occupied by Please Touch with its own hands-on nature museum for children, “Outside In.”

Outside In proved as popular as its predecessor, and soon the Exhibits Department was busy planning a larger, more immersive environment to house it in. After two years of collaborative planning between the Exhibits and Education Departments, in September 1984, the new and improved Outside In opened in its current location on the third floor.

In 1981, after 20 years of showing traveling and temporary exhibits, the Academy unveiled its first purpose-built Hall of Changing Exhibits. Located on the upper level of the former Lecture Hall, this 3500 square foot gallery could accommodate a wider range of exhibits than the ad hoc halls that had previously been used.

In 1983, work began on the Academy’s most ambitious exhibit project since the diorama days of the 1930s and 40s. The entire first floor and mezzanine of the Race Street building, which featured the Hall of Earth History and a smattering of other smaller exhibits, would be transformed into a permanent exhibit called “Discovering Dinosaurs.

A “dinosaur renaissance” had begun several years earlier, when several researchers began proposing the controversial theory that dinosaurs were agile, intelligent creatures; not the dim-witted ponderous beasts they had been previously portrayed as. Riding the wave of this renewed public interest, the Exhibits Department spent two years planning this major exhibit, which, according to one promotional article from 1983, would “step beyond the traditional displays of bones and skeletons that mark most dinosaur exhibits and will focus on recent theories about dinosaurs as living animals.”

To help alleviate the disappointment of visitors during the two-year-long dinosaur-free period leading up to the opening of the exhibit in early 1986, a temporary exhibit called “Dinosaurs: An Exhibit in the Making” opened in February 1984.

1986-1997: The Academy becomes the Dinosaur Museum For much of the 1980s and up until 1994, Samuel Gubens, Vice President for Finance and Administration, oversaw the Education and Exhibits Department, along with Marketing, Communications, the Museum Shop, and Visitor Services. Upon Gubens’ departure, these departments were organized into a separate division called Public Programs. In 1995, Phelan Fretz, who held a PhD in science education, became Vice President of Public Programs; however, his stay lasted just three years.

Education Department In 1986, the opening of the “Discovering Dinosaurs” exhibit sparked renewed public interest in the Academy—especially among children. That year, museum attendance shot up 68%, with more than 300,000 visitors coming through the doors. The Education Department met the increased demand for programs by reaching 436,000 children and adults (both on-site and off-site), Outside In hosted more than 175,000 visitors, Expeditions for Everyone had more than 1,000 participants, and the docent program attracted dozens of new volunteers.

1986 was also the year that the department established the roster of daily general visitor programs that continues to today. These included auditorium programs featuring live animals and slides, mini-shows in the exhibit galleries (also featuring live animals), and short nature films presented in the auditorium.

During this time, programs for adults began to wane, although the department continued to host the Explorer Series lectures and Expeditions for Everyone. For families and children, three new fee-based programs were added: Saturday Adventures, which were children’s programs that featured live animals, the Museum Family Theatre Series, which were family-oriented evening programs that combined science with participatory theater, and Safari Overnights, which were billed as “weekend camp-ins for organized youth groups and their leaders.”

In 1988, two new grant-funded programs were added to the department’s roster: SEUS, which underserved 7th and 8th graders, and a Community Group Partnership program to help science museums develop joint projects with community groups that work with women, minorities, and the disabled.

With an ever-growing roster of youth programs, most of which were grant-funded and aimed at underserved audiences, the Education Department grew from nine staff members in 1986 to 16 in 1996.

In 1990, after 15 years of heading up the department, Russ Daws left the Academy to become the director of the Tallahassee Museum. He was replaced by Jim McGonigle, who had been the Director of Watershed Programs. Over the next four years, he attempted to renew programming for a broad range of audiences, including adults. He launched a variety or adult courses, ranging from urban gardening to drawing dinosaurs. He also attempted to draw adult audiences to the museum on Wednesday evenings by keeping the museum open until 9 p.m. He also initiated a summer day camp program, which ran for the next decade.

In 1994, the directorship changed again when Nancy Peter joined the staff. With degrees in animal behavior and environmental education, Peter turned the focus of the department once again on youth programming, this time with a new emphasis on programs that utilized live animals. For a short time in 1994, Expeditions for Everyone were discontinued, but were brought back in March 1995 due to popular demand. Although now they were led mostly by outside experts and research staff, not by educators.

In 1996, Peter’s role expanded when she was made Director of Visitor Services.

The live animal section of the department received more prominent attention with the opening in 1997 of the Live Animal Center, funded by the Women’s Committee. This viewable animal enclosure moved into the space formerly occupied by the Widener Education Center. These expanded quarters enabled the live animal collection to enjoy a period of growth that has continued to the present. However, they also replaced the Academy’s only dedicated classroom space, thereby limiting the kinds of programs the Education Department could offer.

Exhibits After opening Discovering Dinosaurs in 1986, the Exhibits Department threw itself into developing and hosting a dizzying variety of changing exhibits. Shows ranged from candy to cows, robotic dinosaurs to treasures of the tar pits. The South Mezzanine served as a secondary changing exhibits gallery to accommodate smaller shows, which ran concurrently with larger shows in the changing exhibit gallery.

Also in 1986, the department made a concerted effort to assess and improve the condition of its historic dioramas and the natural history specimens that comprise the Academy’s non-research collections. Funded by grants from the Institute for Museum Services, a comprehensive condition survey was conducted to identify the most valuable objects and the most pressing conservation issues. Subsequently, the newly identified high-value items were re-housed and, when possible, stabilized. As for the dioramas, although the assessment revealed that all were suffering from years of neglect, the Serengeti Plain was identified as the most seriously damaged and underwent conservation and restoration in 1988.

Unfortunately, the directorship of the Exhibits Department continued to change hands in rapid succession, making it difficult to gain traction in any given area. Six different directors came and went during the 10 years following the opening of Discovering Dinosaurs, resulting in a department that drifted from one project to the next, each with a different set of priorities.

The longest-serving director during this time period was Mark Driscoll, who headed up the department between 1990 and 1995. Under his direction, the Big Dig interactive area on the mezzanine of Discovering Dinosaurs became first a temporary and then permanent exhibit. Also, Butterflies—Live and In Color, the first of several temporary exhibits featuring live butterflies opened.

In 1993, just seven years after Discovering Dinosaurs opened, the film “Jurassic Park” hit the theaters. Its computer-generated depiction of dinosaurs raised the bars for dinosaur exhibits across the country, including the Academy’s. Within two years, the Exhibits Department was gearing up for a $4.2 million renovation of Discovering Dinosaurs. The staff doubled in size (from five to ten), with five members of the department making up the Discovering Dinosaurs project team.

For the next five years, half of the department was focused on dinosaurs, while the other half kept busy producing several generations of live butterfly exhibits and mounting at least three traveling exhibits each year. Sadly, the dinosaur project was plagued with a variety of problems. The expected funding never materialized, the work fell behind schedule and delayed the publicly announced opening, the project manager was fired in mid-course and replaced with someone with no previous experience in managing exhibit projects. In short, it was a time of great turmoil that yielded a less-than-successful exhibit and a disheartened staff.

1998-2006: The Academy becomes a Children’s Museum In 1998, the Public Programs division lost its Vice President, Director of Education, and Director of Exhibits—all at the same time. The Academy also welcomed a new President, Paul Hanle. Rather than fill the position of Vice President, Hanle decided to restructure. He created two positions: Director of Operations, which was filled by Jay Pennie, a former retail store manager, and Director of Exhibits and Education, which was filled by Willard Whitson, an exhibit designer formerly with the American Museum of Natural History.

This administrative structure was short-lived and, the following year, it changed again. Pennie stayed on in his original position and was joined by Andrew Yanelli, another retail store manager, while Whitson was reassigned as Director of Exhibits.

Soon after Pennie’s arrival, he instituted a number of marketing surveys. A public perception survey revealed that many people thought the Academy was stuffy, stodgy, and elitist. What they wanted was a fun place to bring their kids. A member survey showed that members felt there weren’t enough events and activities offered exclusively to them. With this data in hand, and with the support of Hanle, Pennie began revamping the Academy’s public offerings.

Education For much of this period, the Education Department was without a director. Between 1999 and 2004, it fell under the supervision of Andrew Yannelli, a former retail store manager with no background in education. During this time, the department grew larger in size, more fragmented in organization, and almost exclusively focused on children. The Live Animal Unit became a separate department, headed up by Jacquie Genovesi. The rest of the staff became assigned to individual programmatic units, such as Outside In and Dinosaur Hall.

For a short time in the late 1990s, both the WINS and SEEC programs were removed from the Education Department altogether and placed into a completely independent department called “Learning and Technology.” By the following year, the two grant-funded programs had rejoined the rest of Education.

Also beginning in 1998, a robust roster of members-only programs and activities began to be cultivated. All adult education programs were transferred out of the Education Department and placed in the Membership Department. They were soon joined by family workshops, overnighters, and even the Expeditions for Everyone—now renamed “Academy Adventures,” and the Explorer Lecture Series, which was discontinued altogether and replaced with travelogues, which were organized by the Geographical Society.

The Education Department cultivated their focus on the youth audience. Free weekend programs took off, at first in all directions—game shows, jugglers, departmental open houses—but by 2002 they had settled into a yearly calendar of themed weekends—oceans, insects, reptiles, etc.

1999 was a watershed year for the Education Department—literally. Thanks to a large grant from the EPA, the department launched a variety of programs that emphasized watershed ecology. The centerpiece of this initiative was called the Urban Rivers Awareness Program and included teacher workshops, outreach programs, discovery lessons, and on-the-water experiences for both students and teachers. The bulk of these programs ran for five years—the duration of the grant.

In 2000, the Academy worked out an agreement with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America whereby youngsters could earn badges by fulfilling the requirements of Academy programs developed especially for them. These programs proved to be extremely successful. Also in 2001, the Education Department received a generous bequest from the Florence Foerderer estate. Part of this bequest made possible the purchase of two new vans for the department’s outreach program.

From 1962? To 2002?, the Education Department staff roster included two Philadelphia School District teachers. These teachers, whose salaries were paid by the school district, planned and delivered lessons for Philadelphia public school groups visiting the Academy. Around 2002, this arrangement was dissolved and in 2004 was replaced with SENSES (Supporting and Enriching Natural Science Education in Schools). Supported with a $250,000 district grant, this partnership program between the Academy and the School District used inquiry-based learning adventures to help teachers and students at six partner schools. As of 2009, this program remains part of the Education Department offerings, although it is no longer funded by the Philadelphia School District. Instead, it is supported by a variety of private and government grants, which the Academy solicits and administers.

In the fall of 2004, the Academy once again began offering adult lectures for the general public; however, they were not part of the Education Department. Called the “Town Square” series and organized through the Environmental Associates, they brought together scientific and policy experts for discussions of critical environmental issues. Two of first three were themed to coincide with the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Exhibit.

In 2005, Jacquie Genovesi was promoted from Director of Living Exhibits to Director of Education.

Exhibits In March 1998, the Academy opened its newly renovated Discovering Dinosaurs. It featured an expanded Big Dig interactive area, brightly colored interpretive graphics, and a variety of activities that let visitors “get [their] hands into dinosaur blood, guts, and behavior.” In short, the new Discovering Dinosaurs was a more child-friendly version of its former self.

Later that same month, the Academy also helped sponsor Dinofest, a month-long festival at the Civic Center. The rationale of combining the opening of the new exhibit and the festival was to create a level of excitement that would translate into a huge boost in museum attendance. Sadly, this did not come to pass. While nearly 450,000 people attended Dinofest, only 187,721 visited the Academy in 1998—just 9% more than the previous year and far fewer than the 300,000+ who had visited in 1986 when the original version of Discovering Dinosaurs had opened.

The following year, the Academy produced the traveling exhibit “Planet Golf,” a cartoon-character-filled miniature golf course that explored various environmental topics. Unfortunately, the name “Planet Golf” was already a registered trademark and so the exhibit was re-named “Fore the Planet.” It toured as a traveling show, returning to the Academy in 2000, 2001 and 2002.

Also in 1999, the Academy hosted what must have been the shortest exhibit in its history. Called “Insects: Jewels of Nature,” this exhibit covered the entire museum and featured tens of thousands of specimens from the Academy’s entomology collection. It ran just two days.

The Exhibits Department entered a tumultuous period when, in 2001, it opened “Living Downstream,” a permanent multimedia exhibit that explored the workings of watersheds. This exhibit was installed in a location previously occupied by a diorama featuring whistling swans. The demolition of the diorama, combined with the less-than-successful execution of the watershed exhibit created a rift between the Exhibits Department and the research staff that lasted for many years.

For the next three years, the department focused its attention on the auditorium and the exhibit area just in front of it. The auditorium received an upgraded a/v system, new seating, carpeting, and stage curtains. The adjacent exhibit area was transformed from a display of Mesozoic marine reptiles to a permanent exhibit called “Science at the Academy,” which showcased current research projects.

In 2004, the Academy hosted one of its most successful traveling exhibits (Chocolate) and one of its most ambitious ones (the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial). Chocolate drew nearly 67,000 visitors in its three-month run. The Lewis and Clark exhibit was also very popular, drawing nearly 94,000 visitors over a five-month period. However, the Academy had invested much more in the Lewis and Clark exhibit—two years planning, designing, negotiating loans, and fundraising, deinstalling the butterfly gallery, retrofitting the space to accommodate the heightened environmental and security requirements of the artifacts, and spending more than a million dollars on advertising and promotion.

In the wake of Lewis and Clark, which had been hailed as a critical success, but a financial disappointment, the Exhibits Department focused its attention once more on kid-friendly exhibits. The changing exhibit hall hosted a series of shows aimed at young children, including Dogs, Frogs, Bones, and My Home Planet Earth. In the permanent galleries, a small display of live snakehead fish went on exhibit and the auxiliary changing exhibit gallery was once again made into a live butterfly exhibit…although this version was designed to be year-round and permanent.

Just as Butterflies! was entering its construction phase, the Director of Exhibits, Willard Whitson, left the Academy to join the Please Touch Museum. In September 2006, Barbara Ceiga was hired to replace him.

Researchers will find a range of materials that span the better part of the 20th century. Of special interest are the Harold T. Green papers, for these include paintings, specimens, color swatches, sketches, photographs, and illustrations of all sorts taken in situ on expeditions to Africa in the 1930s. Later series reflect the operating methods of the Exhibit Department's project managers into the 1990s.

Transferred from the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia Exhibits Department.

Publisher
Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia
Finding Aid Author
Finding aid prepared by Kira Vidumsky
Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may apply. Please contact the Archives with requests for copying and for authorization to publish, quote or reproduce the material.

Collection Inventory

Physical Description

Box 1, 2

Angola, 1931.
Box 1 Folder 1
Biddle: Alaska, 1933.
Box 1 Folder 2
Vanderbilt: Africa, Book 1, 1934.
Box 1 Folder 3
Vanderbilt: Africa, Book 2, 1934.
Box 1 Folder 4
Ker: Trans Africa safari, 1934.
Box 1 Folder 5
Western United States - Wapaiti and Prong Horn; Mule Deer, 1935, 1939.
Box 1 Folder 6
Carpenter: Africa Expedition, 1936.
Box 1 Folder 7
Carpenter: Sinola, Mexico, 1938.
Box 1 Folder 8
Carpenter: Alaska, 1940.
Box 1 Folder 9
Desert Group Expedition: Sonora, Mexico, 1946.
Box 1 Folder 10
Ker: Kenya (Nairobi) Safari, 1947-1948.
Box 1 Folder 11
Carpenter: Third Africa Expedition, 1948.
Box 1 Folder 12
Carpenter: Arabian Expedition, 1952.
Box 1 Folder 13
Carpenter: Africa, 1955.
Box 1 Folder 14
Biddle-Deshon: Nicaragua, 1961.
Box 1 Folder 15
Bartlett: Far North, 1929.
Box 1 Folder 16
de Schaunsee: Africa, 1930.
Box 1 Folder 17
Coxey: Ecuador, 1931.
Box 1 Folder 18
Foster: Indo-China, 1931.
Box 1 Folder 19
Carpenter: Mexico, 1934.
Box 1 Folder 20
Vanderbilt: Africa, 1934.
Box 1 Folder 21
Denison-Crockett: South Pacific, 1937-1938.
Box 1 Folder 22
Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia, 1994.
Box 1 Folder 23
Sinaloa, Mexico, 1938.
Box 2 Folder 1
Carpenter: Alaska, 1940.
Box 2 Folder 2
Vanderbilt: South Pacific, 1940.
Box 2 Folder 3-4
Carpenter: Africa, 1946.
Box 2 Folder 5
Carpenter: Africa, 1947.
Box 2 Folder 6
Carpenter: Africa (album), 1946-1947.
Box 2 Folder 7
Stroud Guanaya Sheild Expedition: Venezuela, 1985.
Box 2 Folder 8
Unidentified expedition photographs, undated.
Box 2 Folder 9-12
Expedition photograph negatives, undated.
Box 2 Folder 13-17
Expedition and specimen index cards, undated.
Box 2 Folder 18

Physical Description

Box 2-5

Expedition reports, 1929-1935.
Box 3 Folder 1
Second Gray African Expedition, 1930.
Box 3 Folder 2-4
Expedition expenses, 1930.
Box 3 Folder 5
Vanderbilt: Africa expedition scenes, 1934.
Box 3 Folder 6
Vanderbilt: Africa, 1934.
Box 3 Folder 7-12
Kenya: Bongo and Rhino group, vegetation sketches, 1934.
Box 3 Folder 13
Carpenter: West Greenland, 1934.
Box 3 Folder 14
Pronghorn-Elk expedition, 1935.
Box 3 Folder 15
Alaska and Montana expeditions, 1935.
Box 3 Folder 16
Carpenter: Africa, 1936.
Box 3 Folder 17
Le Gendre: Sydney expedition, 1937.
Box 3 Folder 18
Sinoloa expedition, 1938.
Box 3 Folder 19
Carpenter: Alaska, 1940.
Box 3 Folder 20
Carpenter: Sonara, Mexico, 1940-1946.
Box 3 Folder 21
Carpenter: Africa, 1946.
Box 3 Folder 22
Sudan, Africa, 1946.
Box 3 Folder 23
Liberia, West Africa, 1947.
Box 3 Folder 24
Carpenter: Trans-African expedition, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 25-26
Carpenter: Trans-African expedition itinerary and travel notes, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 27
Carpenter: Trans-African expedition equipment and supplies, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 28
Carpenter: Trans-African expedition specimens and data, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 29
Carpenter: Trans-African expedition specimens collected, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 30
Carpenter: Trans-African expedition field notes and observations, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 31
Carpenter: Trans-African mammal measurements, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 32
Carpenter: Trans-African reports, 1947-1948.
Box 3 Folder 33
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - specimens collected, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 34
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - travel credentials, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 35
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - travel and animals of Oman, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 36
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Oman and Southeast Arabia, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 37
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Yemen, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 38
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - equipment and supplies, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 39
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - reports, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 40
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Captain Vesey-Fitzgerald's notes, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 41
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Captain Vesey-Fitzgerald's reports, 1952.
Box 3 Folder 42
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Tribes of Southeast Arabia, 1952.
Box 4 Folder 1
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Oman and Muscat, 1952.
Box 4 Folder 2-4
Carpenter: Arabian expedition - Northwest Arabia, 1952.
Box 4 Folder 5
Audubon International expedition, circa 1954.
Box 4 Folder 6
Carpenter: African expedition - Territory of Tchad Ennedi, 1955.
Box 4 Folder 7
Carpenter: African expedition - reports, 1955.
Box 4 Folder 8
Carpenter: African expedition - notes on French Africa, 1955.
Box 4 Folder 9
Carpenter: African expedition - African film, 1955.
Box 4 Folder 10
Nicaragua expedition, 1961.
Box 4 Folder 11
Correspondence: "A", 1958, 1961.
Box 4 Folder 12
Correspondence: Air Force, 1942-1945.
Box 4 Folder 13
Correspondence: Big game, 1959.
Box 4 Folder 14
Correspondence: Birds, inquiries and information, 1953-1959.
Box 4 Folder 15
Correspondence: Boone and Crockett Club, 1958-1959.
Box 4 Folder 16
Correspondence: "C", 1957-1960.
Box 4 Folder 17
Correspondence: Carpenter, R. R. M., 1935-1949.
Box 4 Folder 18
Correspondence: Carpenter, R. R. M.; "Another Wyoming Hunt", undated.
Box 4 Folder 19
Correspondence: Carpenter, W. K., 1949-1960.
Box 4 Folder 20
Correspondence: Carnegie Museum, 1955-1964.
Box 4 Folder 21
Correspondence: Cranbrook Institute of Science, 1956.
Box 4 Folder 22
Correspondence: Clark, James L., 1957-1959.
Box 4 Folder 23
Correspondence: "D", 1956-1960.
Box 4 Folder 24
Correspondence: "E", 1960-1961.
Box 4 Folder 25
Correspondence: Eckert, Samuel, 1950-1951.
Box 4 Folder 26
Correspondence: Edmond-Blanc, Francois, 1948-1962.
Box 4 Folder 27
Correspondence: "F", 1959.
Box 4 Folder 28
Correspondence: Fritz, Grancel, 1957.
Box 4 Folder 29
Correspondence: Jonas Brothers, 1956.
Box 4 Folder 30
Correspondence: "K", 1940, 1954, 1961.
Box 4 Folder 31
Correspondence: "L", 1956-1957, 1961.
Box 4 Folder 32
Correspondence: Luttinger, Leo A. (Pennsylvania Game Commission), 1957-1961.
Box 4 Folder 33
Correspondence: Minerals, inquiries and information, 1953.
Box 4 Folder 34
Correspondence: Museum, inquiries and information, 1960-1961.
Box 4 Folder 35
Correspondence: Onza, 1955.
Box 4 Folder 36
Correspondence: "P", 1958-1960.
Box 4 Folder 37
Correspondence: Peabody Museum, 1954.
Box 4 Folder 38
Correspondence: Quaker City Federal Savings and Loan Associates, 1959.
Box 4 Folder 39
Correspondence: Ring, H. W., 1960.
Box 4 Folder 40
Correspondence: Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery, 1956-1957.
Box 4 Folder 41
Correspondence: Record heads, circa 1968.
Box 4 Folder 42
Correspondence: "S", 1960-1961.
Box 4 Folder 43
Correspondence: Smithsonian Institute, 1957-1960.
Box 4 Folder 44
Correspondence: Thorington, J. Monroe, 1943-1946.
Box 4 Folder 45-46
Correspondence: University of Pennsylvania Museum, 1957, 1960.
Box 4 Folder 47
Correspondence: "W", 1959.
Box 4 Folder 48
Correspondence: Yoshimoto, S., 1958.
Box 4 Folder 49
Correspondence: unprocessed, 1932-1964.
Box 4 Folder 50-54
Anthropological notes, circa 1935.
Box 4 Folder 55
Newspaper clippings, 1936-1946.
Box 4 Folder 56
Manuscript: Martin-Johnson Expedition Bulletin numbers 3-7, 1924-1925.
Box 4 Folder 57-61
Manuscript: William K. du Pont account of hunting experiences from 1932 to 1946, 1949.
Box 4 Folder 62
Manuscript: "A Journey to Africa via San Francisco," author unknown, undated.
Box 4 Folder 63
Manuscript: "Antelope Trapping and Transplanting in Texas," E. G. Marsh, Jr., undated.
Box 4 Folder 64
Unidentified correspondence and photographs, circa 1931-1961.
Box 4 Folder 65
African Water Hole exhibit, undated.
Box 5 Folder 1-2
Alaskan white sheep group, 1933.
Box 5 Folder 3-4
Arabian oryx, undated.
Box 5 Folder 5
Arabian tahr group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 6
Barbary sheep group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 7
Bobcat group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 8
Cape buffalo group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 9
Caribou group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 10
Globus monkey group, 1961.
Box 5 Folder 11
Desert of Borkou group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 12-13
Desert sheep group, 1946.
Box 5 Folder 14
Desert sheep group, plant specimens, 1946.
Box 5 Folder 15
Giant panda group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 16
Goats and sheep, North America, undated.
Box 5 Folder 17
Moose group (Alaska), undated.
Box 5 Folder 18-19
Mule deer and mountain lion group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 20-22
Musk ox group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 23
North American mammals, undated.
Box 5 Folder 24
Okapi group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 25
Opossum and skunk group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 26
Passenger pigeon, undated.
Box 5 Folder 27
Polar bear, undated.
Box 5 Folder 28
Pronghorn antelope group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 29
River Reconstruction group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 30
Rocky Mountain goat group, 1932.
Box 5 Folder 31
Snow leopard, undated.
Box 5 Folder 32
Sze-Chwan takin group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 33
Tiger group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 34
White sheep group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 35
White-tailed deer group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 36
Wild yak group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 38
Habitat groups - historical groups, undated.
Box 5 Folder 39
Inventory of skins and animals in storage and habitat groups, undated.
Box 5 Folder 40
Whistling swan group, undated.
Box 5 Folder 37
Inventory of specimens arranged by expedition, 1935-1937.
Box 5 Folder 41
"Map Outlining the Expeditions of the Museum, 1927-1928", undated.
Box 5 Folder 42
Collection management folder, undated.
Box 5 Folder 43
Diorama groups notes, undated.
Box 5 Folder 44
Pipe and ashtray, undated.
Box 48 Box 48
Location note

Pipe and ashtray have been relocated to box 48.

Decorative container, undated.
Box 2 Object 16
Location note

Decorative container has been relocated to box 48.

Physical Description

Box 6-8

Aard Vark, undated.
Box 6 Folder 1
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, undated.
Box 6 Folder 2
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia exhibition images, undated.
Box 6 Folder 3
Academy signage project, 1982.
Box 6 Folder 4
Accessions after 1977, circa 1980.
Box 6 Folder 5
Accessions: 1982, circa 1985.
Box 6 Folder 6
Accessions: gifts and purchases, circa 1985.
Box 6 Folder 7
Afghanistan mammals, undated.
Box 6 Folder 8
African animals: Stewart, 1962-1963.
Box 6 Folder 9
African cave, 1978-1982.
Box 6 Folder 10
African Hall, circa 1946.
Box 6 Folder 11
African lion group, undated.
Box 6 Folder 12
African objects quest, undated.
Box 6 Folder 13
African Water Hole exhibit, circa 1968.
Box 6 Folder 14
Alaska photographs, undated.
Box 6 Folder 15
American bison group, undated.
Box 6 Folder 16
American Museum of Natural History, undated.
Box 6 Folder 17
Amphibians and reptiles, undated.
Box 6 Folder 18
Animal exhibits: local, undated.
Box 6 Folder 19
Animal sounds slide program, 1983.
Box 6 Folder 20
Antelope: Giant sable group, undated.
Box 6 Folder 21
Antelope, pronghorn, undated.
Box 6 Folder 22
Antlers and Horns exhibition photographs, undated.
Box 6 Folder 23
Arabian expedition, undate.
Box 6 Folder 24
Aisan birds and insect exhibit, circa 1931-1932.
Box 6 Folder 25
Asiatic Hall, undated.
Box 6 Folder 26
Ass: Tibetan, undated.
Box 6 Folder 27
Audubon folio, undated.
Box 6 Folder 28
Bald eagle group, undated.
Box 6 Folder 29
Bald eagle, undated.
Box 6 Folder 30
Bald eagle label, undated.
Box 6 Folder 31
Bear: Alaskan brown bear group, undated.
Box 6 Folder 32
Bear: Black bear group, circa 1959.
Box 6 Folder 33
Beaver diorama, undated.
Box 6 Folder 34
Beaver group images, undated.
Box 6 Folder 35
Bicentennial cases, circa 1976.
Box 6 Folder 36
Big horn sheep, undated.
Box 6 Folder 37
Bird clubs and birding areas, undated.
Box 6 Folder 38
Bird group (extinct), undated.
Box 6 Folder 39
Bird Hall exhibits, undated.
Box 6 Folder 40
Bird images, undated.
Box 6 Folder 41
Birds in storage, undated.
Box 6 Folder 42
Bison group, undated.
Box 6 Folder 43
Bison group sign, undated.
Box 6 Folder 44
Bongo, undated.
Box 6 Folder 45
Botany, undated.
Box 6 Folder 46
Building, undated.
Box 6 Folder 47
Carnivorous plant exhibit, undated.
Box 6 Folder 48
Cheetahs, undated.
Box 6 Folder 49
Cloud chart, undated.
Box 6 Folder 50
Clouded leopard, undated.
Box 6 Folder 51
Coral reef exhibit, undated.
Box 6 Folder 52
Desert life group (North America), undated.
Box 6 Folder 53
Dinosaur - Hadrosaurus exhibit, undated.
Box 6 Folder 54
Dinosaur - Torosaurus exhibit, undated.
Box 6 Folder 55
Dinosaurs, undated.
Box 6 Folder 56
Diorama labels, undated.
Box 6 Folder 57-58
Diorama label copy, 1981-1982.
Box 6 Folder 59
Diorama skin panels, 1983.
Box 6 Folder 60
Donner study, 1968.
Box 6 Folder 61
Earth History Hall, circa 1937.
Box 7 Folder 1-5
Educational props, undated.
Box 7 Folder 6
Elephant (pygmy), undated.
Box 7 Folder 7
Elk, undated.
Box 7 Folder 8
Endangered Species Hall, undated.
Box 7 Folder 9
Entomology, undated.
Box 7 Folder 10
Environmental Protection Agency, circa 1972.
Box 7 Folder 11
Expeditions, undated.
Box 7 Folder 12
Fidelity Mutual Building, circa 1972.
Box 7 Folder 13
Fish exhibit data, undated.
Box 7 Folder 14
Fish images, undated.
Box 7 Folder 15
Fish mounts in storage, undated.
Box 7 Folder 16
Fish - Tektite, undated.
Box 7 Folder 17
Floor plans, undated.
Box 7 Folder 18
Florida puma, undated.
Box 7 Folder 19
Fluorescent minerals exhibit, undated.
Box 7 Folder 20
Flowers show, undated.
Box 7 Folder 21
Fossil footprints - Limerick, undated.
Box 7 Folder 22
Fossils, undated.
Box 7 Folder 23-25
Franklintown Hotel exhibit, undated.
Box 7 Folder 26
Fulgurite, undated.
Box 7 Folder 27-28
Fur show photos, undated.
Box 7 Folder 29
Geological exhibits, undated.
Box 7 Folder 30
Geology and paleontology, undated.
Box 7 Folder 31
Geology exhibit - local, undated.
Box 7 Folder 32
Gold exhibit layout, undated.
Box 7 Folder 33
Gorilla group, undated.
Box 7 Folder 34
Great horned owl, undated.
Box 7 Folder 35
Grizzly bears, undated.
Box 7 Folder 36
Gun collection inventory, 1965.
Box 7 Folder 37
Habitat groups, undated.
Box 7 Folder 38
Heads and Horns exhibit, 1941.
Box 7 Folder 39
Heads and Horns exhibit, 1954.
Box 7 Folder 40
Health hen, undated.
Box 7 Folder 41
Herpetology, undated.
Box 7 Folder 42
History records of museum groups, undated.
Box 7 Folder 43
Hornets exhibit, undated.
Box 7 Folder 44
Ibex - typical cat, undated.
Box 7 Folder 45
Ichthyology, undated.
Box 7 Folder 46
Insect and Invertebrate Hall, 1953.
Box 7 Folder 47
Insect exhibit, undated.
Box 7 Folder 48
Insect exhibit, 1981-1982.
Box 7 Folder 49
Insect photographs, undated.
Box 7 Folder 50
Insect, spiders (trap door), undated.
Box 7 Folder 51
Jaguar exhibit number one, undated.
Box 7 Folder 52
Insect exhibit budget, undated.
Box 7 Folder 53
Jaguar group photograph, undated.
Box 7 Folder 54
Jaguars, undated.
Box 7 Folder 55
Labels: general information, undated.
Box 7 Folder 56
Library, undated.
Box 7 Folder 57
Limnology, undated.
Box 7 Folder 58
Localities for collecting specimens, undated.
Box 7 Folder 59
"Looks That Kill", 1977.
Box 7 Folder 60
Malacology, undated.
Box 8 Folder 1
Mammal skin catalog, undated.
Box 8 Folder 2
Mammalogy, undated.
Box 8 Folder 3
Manatee, undated.
Box 8 Folder 4
Marbled cat, undated.
Box 8 Folder 5
Mastodon, undated.
Box 8 Folder 6
Meteorite exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 7
Mineral Hill meetings, circa 1980.
Box 8 Folder 8
Mineral Hall photographs, undated.
Box 8 Folder 9
Mineral keys in shell department, 1977.
Box 8 Folder 10
Moon rocks, circa 1973.
Box 8 Folder 11
Museum notes, circa 1975.
Box 8 Folder 12
Museum signs, circa 1980.
Box 8 Folder 13
Ornithology, undated.
Box 8 Folder 14
Outside-In, circa 1980.
Box 8 Folder 15
Pennsylvania Game Commission exhibit, 1949.
Box 8 Folder 16
Plant photographs, undated.
Box 8 Folder 17
Plants and pollution, undated.
Box 8 Folder 18
Poisonous plants exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 19
Porcupine, undated.
Box 8 Folder 20
Prehistoric rock picture exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 21
Publications: other institutions, circa 1980.
Box 8 Folder 22
Publicity: other institutions, undated.
Box 8 Folder 23
Recycling exhibition, undated.
Box 8 Folder 24
Reptile and amphibian photographs, undated.
Box 8 Folder 25-26
Reptile exhibits, undated.
Box 8 Folder 27
Research exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 28
Rhinoceros (black), undated.
Box 8 Folder 29
Rhinoceros (white), undated.
Box 8 Folder 30
Rivers exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 31
Rubellite Gallery: security, 1982.
Box 8 Folder 32
Rubellite permanent installation, 1982.
Box 8 Folder 33
Saudi Arabia proposed expedition, 1949.
Box 8 Folder 34
Sea otter, undated.
Box 8 Folder 35
Seals, undated.
Box 8 Folder 36
Shark (mako) exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 37
Shell exhibit - liguus, undated.
Box 8 Folder 38
Smithsonian Internship Program, undated.
Box 8 Folder 39
Specimens - mounted, undated.
Box 8 Folder 40
Stained glass panel of fishes, undated.
Box 8 Folder 41
Stokes stamp exhibit, 1967.
Box 8 Folder 42
Stratigraphy, undated.
Box 8 Folder 43
Traveling exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 44
Wasp, undated.
Box 8 Folder 45
Water exhibit, undated.
Box 8 Folder 46
Whales, undated.
Box 8 Folder 47
White-throated capuchin monkey, undated.
Box 8 Folder 48
Whooping cranes, undated.
Box 8 Folder 49
Winter, undated.
Box 8 Folder 50
Wyoming, 1930-1934.
Box 8 Folder 51
Diorama Workbook: Okapi Group, Gorilla Group, Sitatunga Group (file 1 of 3), undated.
Box 50 Folder 1
Diorama Workbook: Okapi Group, Gorilla Group, Sitatunga Group (file 2 of 3), undated.
Box 50 Folder 2
Diorama Workbook: Okapi Group, Gorilla Group, Sitatunga Group (file 3 of 3), undated.
Box 50 Folder 3
Annotated specimen collection ephemera, habitat groups: spent bullets, 1903.
Box 50 Folder 4
Leaf Specimens, Desert Group and Barbary Sheep.
Box 50 Folder 5
Green, Harold T.
Box 50 Folder 6
Habitat Tags, Labels from Mounted Animals (Habitat Groups), undated.
Box 50 Folder 7
1938 Hall of Earth History, 1938.
Box 50 Folder 8
Jonas Brothers Studio Yonkers (1929-1936) Correspondence, 1929-1936.
Box 50 Folder 9
Jonas, Louis (1929-1936) Correspondence, 1929-1936.
Box 50 Folder 10
Jonas, Louis (1937-1942) Correspondence, 1937-1942.
Box 50 Folder 11
Jonas, Louis (1946-1950) Correspondence, 1946-1950.
Box 50 Folder 12
Jonas, Louis (1951-1954) Correspondence, 1951-1954.
Box 50 Folder 13
West African Mammals (1947-1948), 1947-1948.
Box 50 Folder 14
East African Mammals (1930), 1930.
Box 50 Folder 15
Vertebrate Paleontology, undated.
Box 50 Folder 16
Audubon Bird Hall and Other Exhibits, undated.
Box 50 Folder 17
Exhibit Info (includes obituary of H. T. Green, 1967).
Box 50 Folder 18
Diorama Groups (includes negatives).
Box 50 Folder 19
Mammal Photos (File 1 of 3).
Box 50 Folder 20
Mammal Photos (File 2 of 3).
Box 50 Folder 21
Mammal Photos (File 3 of 3).
Box 50 Folder 22
Mammal Mounts.
Box 50 Folder 23
Preparation of a Habitat Group.
Box 50 Folder 24
Dioramas, Other Institutions.
Box 50 Folder 25
Model Makers 50s (sic) Archives List.
Box 50 Folder 26
Articles on Museum Design, 1959, 1961, 1962.
Box 50 Folder 27
Articles on Exhibit Design, 1959, 1960, 1962-1965, 1967.
Box 50 Folder 28
American (1 of 2).
Box 50 Folder 29
American (2 of 2).
Box 50 Folder 30
American Museum of Natural History.
Box 50 Folder 31
Boston Museum of Natural History.
Box 50 Folder 32
California Academy of Sciences.
Box 50 Folder 33
Carnegie Institution.
Box 50 Folder 34
Colorado Museum of Natural History.
Box 50 Folder 35
Cranbrook Institute of Science.
Box 50 Folder 36
Denver Museum of Natural History.
Box 50 Folder 37
Florida State Museum.
Box 50 Folder 38
Los Angeles Museum.
Box 50 Folder 39
Minnesota Museum of Natural History.
Box 50 Folder 40
New York State Museum.
Box 50 Folder 41
Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.
Box 50 Folder 42
Foreign, late 1950s.
Box 50 Folder 43
Berlin Museum (notes).
Box 50 Folder 44
Landes Museum Hannover, Germany (notes).
Box 50 Folder 45
Black Bear Group.
Box 50 Folder 46

Physical Description

Box 9

Temporary exhibitions, 1958-1961.
Box 9 Folder 1
Extinct birds exhibition: "And Then There Were None", 1965.
Box 9 Folder 2
Silk screening instructions, circa 1965.
Box 9 Folder 3
Museum graphics, circa 1965.
Box 9 Folder 4
"Donations and loans" notebook, circa 1970.
Box 9 Folder 5
Changing exhibitions background and checklists, circa 1971.
Box 9 Folder 6
Exhibits Department applicant submissions, circa 1972.
Box 9 Folder 7
Work-study records, circa 1972.
Box 9 Folder 8
Temporary exhibition schedules, circa 1972.
Box 9 Folder 9
General exhibition planning information, circa 1972.
Box 9 Folder 10
Exhibits images inventory, circa 1972.
Box 9 Folder 11
Scientific staff activities, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 12
Library books returned, 1975.
Box 9 Folder 13
Expense reports, 1975.
Box 9 Folder 14
Exhibit cleaning, circa 1976.
Box 9 Folder 15
Ramirez and Woods loans, circa 1976.
Box 9 Folder 16
Timesheet information, 1976-1979.
Box 9 Folder 17
Personal schedule information, 1977.
Box 9 Folder 18
African Hall map and labels, 1977-1978.
Box 9 Folder 19
Delaware Valley Ornithological Club information, 1977-1978.
Box 9 Folder 20
Exhibit loans, 1978.
Box 9 Folder 21
Exhibits Committee meeting notes, 1978.
Box 9 Folder 22
Project management notes, 1978.
Box 9 Folder 23
Exhibition installation progress notes, 1978.
Box 9 Folder 24
Federal Fish and Wildlife salvage permit, 1978.
Box 9 Folder 25
Coastal plain fossil exhibit contributors, 1978.
Box 9 Folder 26
Fiberglass diorama shell design, circa 1978.
Box 9 Folder 27
Notes from Dennis Wint, 1978-1979.
Box 9 Folder 28
Exhibits correspondence, 1978-1979.
Box 9 Folder 29
Project management notes, 1978-1980.
Box 9 Folder 30
Unicorn exhibition, 1978-1980.
Box 9 Folder 31
X-ray photograph exhibition, 1979.
Box 9 Folder 32
Correspondence from H. Fleischman, 1979.
Box 9 Folder 33
Membership exhibition, 1979.
Box 9 Folder 34
Traveling exhibitions, 1979.
Box 9 Folder 35
Wildfowl Exposition, 1980-1983.
Box 9 Folder 36
Mineral Hall supply list, 1981.
Box 9 Folder 37
Mammal collection information, 1981.
Box 9 Folder 38
Hall of Changing Exhibitions, undated.
Box 9 Folder 39
Bird Hall specimen removal, undated.
Box 9 Folder 40
Astronomy information, undated.
Box 9 Folder 41
Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance Bicentennial planning, 1972-1975.
Box 9 Folder 42-44
Bicentennial science grant program, 1973.
Box 9 Folder 45
Bicentennial budget proposal, 1973.
Box 9 Folder 46
Bicentennial budget plan, circa 1973.
Box 9 Folder 47
Medical, 1973-1974.
Box 9 Folder 48
Funding, 1973-1974.
Box 9 Folder 49-50
Bicentennial exhibit - Frontiers, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 51
Ideas, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 52
Bicentennial - Indians, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 53
Loans, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 54
Mirick, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 55
National Endowment for the Arts, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 56
Bicentennial outline, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 57
Bicentennial planning, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 58-59
Bicentennial program, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 60
Bicentennial program package, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 61
Systematics, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 62
Bicentennial summary, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 63
Bicentennial program and symposium, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 64
Bicentennial Committee meeting notes, 1974-1975.
Box 9 Folder 65
Films, 1974.
Box 9 Folder 66
"Health Horizons '76", circa 1974.
Box 9 Folder 67
Plate tectonics program, circa 1974.
Box 9 Folder 68
Bicentennial symposium, 1975.
Box 9 Folder 69
Publicity, circa 1975.
Box 9 Folder 70
Newspaper clippings, circa 1972.
Box 9 Folder 71
Review of the Academy's Bicentennial Exhibit program, 1975.
Box 9 Folder 72-73
Brainstorming, 1972.
Box 9 Folder 41

Physical Description

Box 10, 11

Academy evaluation project, 1977.
Box 10 Folder 1
Research report on museum labels, 1979.
Box 10 Folder 2
Schedules and timesheets, 1979-1980.
Box 10 Folder 3
Exhibits meetings, 1980.
Box 10 Folder 4
Society of Animal Artists, 1981.
Box 10 Folder 5
Monthly reports and summaries, 1981-1982.
Box 10 Folder 6
Sinage: "Z Studio", 1980-1982.
Box 10 Folder 7
Sinage program, 1981-1982.
Box 10 Folder 8
Exhibits Committee meeting, 1985 July 30.
Box 10 Folder 9
Design process, circa 1985.
Box 10 Folder 10
Administrative notes, 1986-1987.
Box 10 Folder 11
Articles of interest, circa 1986.
Box 10 Folder 12
Corporate Appreciation Night, 1986.
Box 10 Folder 13
Dinosaurs past and present, 1986.
Box 10 Folder 14
Library plate, circa 1986.
Box 10 Folder 15
Library signs, circa 1986.
Box 10 Folder 16
Museum Family Theater events, circa 1986.
Box 10 Folder 17
One hundred seventy fifth anniversary, circa 1986.
Box 10 Folder 18
Discovering Dinosaurs, circa 1986.
Box 10 Folder 19
African Cave, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 20
Anglers All, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 21
Bear - Marino's gift, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 22
Benches - Second floor, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 23
Development graphics, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 24
Dino Film Fest, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 25
Dinosaurs for Dessert, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 26
Dolan case, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 27
Education memos, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 28
Membership desk, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 29
Meeting minutes: Exhibits, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 30
Meeting minutes: Museum, Marketing, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 31
Memos - general, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 32
Museum Christmas cards, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 33
One hundred seventy fifth anniversary copy research, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 34
Outside-In donors, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 35
Stat forms, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 36
Texture paper for Xerox, 1987.
Box 10 Folder 37
"We the People"/"Amber", 1987.
Box 10 Folder 38
WINS Urban Park Project, circa 1987.
Box 10 Folder 39
Academy Calendar Planning Committee, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 40
Anglers All, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 41
Avaceratops, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 42
Bird dome, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 43
Club cards, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 44
Club news and development, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 45
"Confectioner's Art", circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 46
Corporate Appreciation Night, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 47
Dinamation graphics, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 48
Dinosaur clubs invitations, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 49
Education quiz, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 50
Honor Fox, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 51
Label copy, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 52
Maintenance, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 53
Minutes, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 54
Monthly reports, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 55
Newspaper clippings, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 56
Planning Committee, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 57
Safety, circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 58
"What's up when...", circa 1988.
Box 10 Folder 59
WILSON Ornithological Society Centennial Day, 1988.
Box 10 Folder 60
Annual Meeting - Pitcairn exhibit, circa 1989.
Box 10 Folder 61
Academy Events Calendar Planning Committee, 1989.
Box 10 Folder 62
Academy News, 1989.
Box 10 Folder 63
Correspondence, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 1
"Cows" exhibit leads, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 2
"Cows" milk cartons, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 3
Creative science workshops, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 4
Development dummies, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 5
"Dino Alive" banner, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 6
Dinogram, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 7
Dinosaur hunt material, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 8
Educational tools, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 9
Environmental exhibits, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 10
Exhibit ideas, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 11
Graphics - general, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 12
Graphics - standards, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 13
Graphics - instructions, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 14
Honey bee exhibit, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 15
Information envelopes, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 16
Library gala invitation, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 17
Ilbray gala decorations, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 18
Maintenance reports, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 19
Membership sign, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 20
Minutes, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 21
Monthly reports, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 22
Monthly Report in progress, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 23
Museum admission and marketing, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 24
Python copy, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 25
Rules for caterers, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 26
Second floor exhibits, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 27
Second floor renovations, 1989.
Box 11 Folder 28
Grant and loan information, 1989-1992.
Box 11 Folder 29
Exhibits Department meeting notes, 1990-1991.
Box 11 Folder 30
Captions credits file, 1991.
Box 11 Folder 31
Exhibits Department meeting notes, 1991-1992.
Box 11 Folder 32
"Volcanoes", 1992.
Box 11 Folder 33
Current scientific research, 1992.
Box 11 Folder 34
Job descriptions, undated.
Box 11 Folder 35
Exhibit hall specifications, undated.
Box 11 Folder 36
"The Giant Moas" label, undated.
Box 11 Folder 37
Mammal images, undated.
Box 11 Folder 38
Diorama activity centers before Pew, 1984-1986.
Box 11 Folder 39
Endangered species, 1990-1993.
Box 11 Folder 40
Environmental science exhibit plan, 1991-1994.
Box 11 Folder 41
Life and Environment illustrations, circa 1992.
Box 11 Folder 42
Pew grant, 1992-1994.
Box 11 Folder 43
Pew budget, 1993-1994.
Box 11 Folder 44
Research, 1993-1994.
Box 11 Folder 45
Puma and deer diorama audio/lighting project, 1993-1994.
Box 11 Folder 46
Diorama explorer, 1993-1994.
Box 11 Folder 47
Dioramas, 1993-1994.
Box 11 Folder 48-49
Explore North America panels, 1993-1994.
Box 11 Folder 50

Physical Description

Box 12, 13, 14

Exhibit Halls labels, circa 1968.
Box 12 Folder 1
Mineral Hall, 1981.
Box 12 Folder 2
Ice Age Art, 1981.
Box 12 Folder 3
Treasures of the Academy, 1982.
Box 12 Folder 4-6
Outside-In, 1983-1985.
Box 12 Folder 7-11
Duck stamps, 1984-1985.
Box 12 Folder 12
Crystals and Gems, circa 1985.
Box 12 Folder 13
Sex and Gluttony, circa 1985.
Box 12 Folder 14
Earth Science Hall: Early planning, 1986-1988.
Box 12 Folder 15-19
Earth Science Hall notes, 1986-1989.
Box 13 Folder 1-3
Discovering Dinosaurs photographs, circa 1987.
Box 13 Folder 4-7
Ice Age Mammals, 1988-1989.
Box 13 Folder 8
Bears: Imagination and Reality, 1988-1991.
Box 13 Folder 9
Inside Active Volcano, 1989.
Box 13 Folder 10
The Confectioner's Art, 1989.
Box 13 Folder 11-13
Cows: Fact or Fancy, 1989.
Box 13 Folder 14-15
Sharks!, 1989.
Box 13 Folder 16-18
Wilderness America, 1989-1991.
Box 13 Folder 19
Kokoro dinosaur exhibit, 1989-1990.
Box 13 Folder 20
Birds: Floyd Schultz, 1991-1993.
Box 13 Folder 21
Beatrix Potter, 1991-1992.
Box 14 Folder 1
What on Earth!, 1992.
Box 14 Folder 2-5
Treasures of the Tar Pits, 1992.
Box 14 Folder 6-8
Dinosaurs - A Global View, 1992-1993.
Box 14 Folder 9
Jurassic Park, 1993.
Box 14 Folder 10-14
Infomercial, 1994.
Box 14 Folder 15
Bears, 1994.
Box 14 Folder 16
Paleontology Lab, 1994.
Box 14 Folder 17-18
Chuck Jones: An Animated Life, circa 1995.
Box 14 Folder 19
"A Proposal for Reinterpreting Habitat Dioramas at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia", 2001.
Box 14 Folder 20
The Diorama Notebook, 2002.
Box 14 Folder 21-24

Physical Description

Box 15

Taxidermy model suppliers, circa 1976.
Box 15 Folder 1
National Association of Recycling, Incorporated, 1977.
Box 15 Folder 2
Evaluations, 1978.
Box 15 Folder 3
Paramount Communications, 1978.
Box 15 Folder 4
Loans to individuals: returned, 1978-1982.
Box 15 Folder 5
Moore College co-op and work-study programs, 1978-1981.
Box 15 Folder 6
Exhibit companies, 1979.
Box 15 Folder 7
Exhibit ideas, 1979.
Box 15 Folder 8
Exhibits budgets, circa 1979.
Box 15 Folder 9
Decoy exhibit, 1979-1981.
Box 15 Folder 10
Aquarium, 1979-1982.
Box 15 Folder 11
Japanese shell exhibit, 1980.
Box 15 Folder 12
Collection sharing, circa 1980.
Box 15 Folder 13
"Confiscated" exhibit, 1980-1983.
Box 15 Folder 14
Antarctica exhibit, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 15
Carved turkey, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 16
Exhibition schedule, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 17
Exhibit collection storage, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 18
Exhibits Committee, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 19
Inua Revealed, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 20
Jaques exhibit, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 21
Mineralogist search, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 22
Purchase requests, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 23
Timesheets, 1981.
Box 15 Folder 24
Charles M. Knight traveling exhibit, 1981-1982.
Box 15 Folder 25
Construction, 1981-1982.
Box 15 Folder 26
Contracts and agreements, 1981-1982.
Box 15 Folder 27
Changing exhibits, 1981-1983.
Box 15 Folder 28
Prospective traveling exhibits, 1981-1983.
Box 15 Folder 29
American Association of Museums conference, Philadelphia, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 30
Applications and resumes, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 31
Budget record, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 33
Correspondence, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 34
Displays: Phoebe Adams and Jack Larimore, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 35
Environmental display, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 36
"Flowers of Three Centuries" traveling exhibit, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 37
Fuertes exhibit, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 38
Inter-office memos, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 39
Jefferson exhibit, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 40
Loans for conservation, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 41
Monthly reports, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 42
Frederick Mullison: recent photographs, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 43
Paid invoices, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 44
Petty cash receipts, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 45
Post-Ice Age art exhibit (proposed), 1982.
Box 15 Folder 46
Purchase requisitions, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 47
Open storage: third floor gallery, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 48
Time sheets, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 49
Weekly Meeting notes, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 50
Monthly reports, 1982.
Box 15 Folder 51
Petre albums, 1982-1983.
Box 15 Folder 52
Applications and resumes, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 53-54
Co-op evaluation, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 55
Correspondence, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 56
Michael DiGiorgio: Wildlife illustrations, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 57
Exhibits Committee, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 58
Exhibits Committee weekly meetings, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 59
Fossil fair, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 60
Inter-office memos, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 61
Kellogg program - the Field Museum, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 62
Museum staff meeting minutes, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 63
Project schedules, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 64
Project VIREO exhibition, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 65
Purchases, paid, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 66
Time sheets, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 67
Time sheets: work study, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 68
Shipping receipts, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 69
Travel itineraries, 1983.
Box 15 Folder 70
Academy logos, circa 1983.
Box 15 Folder 71
American Association of Museums, 1984-1985.
Box 15 Folder 72
Memorandum, 1985.
Box 15 Folder 73
Microspace exhibit, 1985.
Box 15 Folder 74
"Treasures of the Academy" treasure hunt form, undated.
Box 15 Folder 75

Physical Description

Box 16-23

Academy history, circa 1983.
Box 16 Folder 1-3
Academy publications, 1983-1984.
Box 16 Folder 4
African Water Hole exhibit, circa 1993.
Box 16 Folder 5-7
Alaskan Hut exhibit, undated.
Box 16 Folder 8
Anglers All exhibit, 1986-1987.
Box 16 Folder 9
Animal skin inventories, undated.
Box 16 Folder 10
Ash, Kitty, undated.
Box 16 Folder 11
Aspen, Ruth, undated.
Box 16 Folder 12
Beatrix Potter exhibit, 1992-1995.
Box 16 Folder 13-54 Box 17 Folder 1-14
Belardo, Carolyn, 1995.
Box 17 Folder 15
Bennett, Ehteldred, undated.
Box 17 Folder 16
Biddle, Nicholas, 1961.
Box 17 Folder 17
Birdcage, 1984.
Box 17 Folder 18
Bird Department treasures and history, circa 1982.
Box 17 Folder 19
Bird-dinosaur connection, circa 1983.
Box 17 Folder 20
Bird Hall, circa 1987.
Box 17 Folder 21
Bird Hall - Virginia Campbell murals, undated.
Box 17 Folder 22-23
Bird skin data, 1962, undated.
Box 17 Folder 24
Bones, undated.
Box 17 Folder 25
Carnegie Museum catalogs, undated.
Box 17 Folder 26
Carpenter, William, undated.
Box 17 Folder 27
Carpenter, Robert Ruliph Morgan (Ruly), obituary, undated.
Box 17 Folder 28
Catalogs, notices and publications of Academy exhibits, circa 1983.
Box 17 Folder 29-30
Chesapeake Bay Foundation, 1979.
Box 17 Folder 31
Childrens' museums, undated.
Box 17 Folder 32
City ecology, 1973.
Box 17 Folder 33
Clark, James Lippitt, undated.
Box 17 Folder 34
Coast-Marsh, undated.
Box 17 Folder 35
"Confiscated" exhibit, circa 1982.
Box 17 Folder 36
Conservation, undated.
Box 17 Folder 37
Cook's cannon, circa 1997.
Box 17 Folder 38
Coolers, circa 1978.
Box 17 Folder 39
Diorama data, circa 1991.
Box 17 Folder 40
Diorama groups - inventory and planning, undated.
Box 17 Folder 41
Diorama labels, circa 1981.
Box 17 Folder 42
Diorama lists, 1983.
Box 17 Folder 43
Dinosaur Hall historical information, 1978-1981.
Box 17 Folder 44
Dinosaur Hall mural, 1997.
Box 17 Folder 45
Dinosaur Hall sculpture list and artifact list, 1994.
Box 17 Folder 46
Dinosaur cookies, circa 1983.
Box 17 Folder 47
Dinosaur memorabilia, circa 1987.
Box 17 Folder 48
Discovering Dinosaurs image files, circa 1985.
Box 18 Folder 1-11
Discovering Dinosaurs panel design files, circa 1985.
Box 18 Folder 12-26
Discovering Dinosaurs research articles, circa 1985.
Box 18 Folder 27-52
Discovering Dinosaurs design files, circa 1985.
Box 19 Folder 1-20
Discovering Dinosaurs Preparation Lab photographs, 1984.
Box 19 Folder 21
Discovering Dinosaurs artist: Doug Henderson, 1984.
Box 19 Folder 22
Discovering Dinosaurs artist: Eleanor Kish, 1984-1985.
Box 19 Folder 23
Discovering Dinosaurs artist: John Agnew, 1985.
Box 19 Folder 24
Discovering Dinosaurs: Loans in, 1983-1986.
Box 19 Folder 25
Discovering Dinosaurs: Loans out, 1986.
Box 19 Folder 26
Discovering Dinosaurs: Concept and budget, 1984-1985.
Box 19 Folder 27
Discovering Dinosaurs: Expenses, 1985-1986.
Box 19 Folder 28
Division of Environmental Research exhibit, 1987.
Box 19 Folder 29
Dolan, Brook, undated.
Box 19 Folder 30
Endangered Species Hall, 1983.
Box 19 Folder 31
Evaluation, 1978-1979.
Box 19 Folder 32
Evaluation, 1984.
Box 19 Folder 33
Exhibit materials catalog, circa 1975.
Box 19 Folder 34
Exhibit specimen: African lion group, circa 1976.
Box 19 Folder 35
Exhibit specimen: American bison group, circa 1993.
Box 19 Folder 36
Exhibit specimen: Arabian Tahr, undated.
Box 19 Folder 37
Exhibit specimen: Bald eagle, undated.
Box 19 Folder 38
Exhibit specimen: Barbary sheep (audad), undated.
Box 19 Folder 39
Exhibit specimen: Beaver diorama, undated.
Box 19 Folder 40
Exhibit specimen: Black bear, undated.
Box 19 Folder 41
Exhibit specimen: Bobcat, undated.
Box 19 Folder 42
Exhibit specimen: Brown bear, undated.
Box 19 Folder 43
Exhibit specimen: Cape buffalo, undated.
Box 19 Folder 44
Exhibit specimen: Caribou group, undated.
Box 19 Folder 45
Exhibit specimen: Colobus monkey, undated.
Box 19 Folder 46
Exhibit specimen: Commorants, undated.
Box 19 Folder 47
Exhibit specimen: Crowned crane, undated.
Box 19 Folder 48
Exhibit specimen: Dall sheep, undated.
Box 20 Folder 1-2
Exhibit specimen: Deadly sea snail, undated.
Box 20 Folder 3
Exhibit specimen: Desert of Borkou group, circa 1992.
Box 20 Folder 4
Exhibit specimen: Desert sheep group, undated.
Box 20 Folder 5
Exhibit specimen: Giant panda, undated.
Box 20 Folder 6
Gorilla, undated.
Box 20 Folder 7-8
Exhibit specimen: Hadrosaurus foulkii, circa 1985.
Box 20 Folder 9
Exhibit specimen: Hyrtl skeletons, undated.
Box 20 Folder 10
Exhibit specimen: Irish elk, circa 1985.
Box 20 Folder 11
Exhibit specimen: Kiang, 1991-1993.
Box 20 Folder 12
Exhibit specimen: Kodiak bear, undated.
Box 20 Folder 13
Exhibit specimen: Moa, undated.
Box 20 Folder 14
Exhibit specimen: Musk ox, undated.
Box 20 Folder 15
Exhibit specimen: Okapi, undated.
Box 20 Folder 16
Exhibit specimen: Opossum and skunk, undated.
Box 20 Folder 17
Exhibit specimen: Passenger pigeon, undated.
Box 20 Folder 18
Exhibit specimen: Northeast Pennsylvania mammals, undated.
Box 20 Folder 19
Exhibit specimen: Pennsylvania and New Jersey mammals, undated.
Box 20 Folder 20-21
Exhibit specimen: Polar bear, circa 1993.
Box 20 Folder 22
Exhibit specimen: Pronghorn antelope, undated.
Box 20 Folder 23
Exhibit specimen: Puma and mule deer, circa 1992.
Box 20 Folder 24
Exhibit specimen: Rocky Mountain goat, undated.
Box 20 Folder 25
Exhibit specimen: Sable antelope, circa 1992.
Box 20 Folder 26
Exhibit specimen: Snow leopard, undated.
Box 20 Folder 27
Exhibit specimen: Stone's sheep, undated.
Box 20 Folder 28
Exhibit specimen: Takin group, circa 1992.
Box 20 Folder 29
Exhibit specimen: Tiger, circa 1994.
Box 20 Folder 30
Exhibit specimen: Tundra swan, undated.
Box 20 Folder 31
Exhibit specimen: Wild yak, circa 1992.
Box 20 Folder 32
"Explorations and Recreations" diorama exhibit, 1992.
Box 20 Folder 33
Fairbanks, John Jr., 1997.
Box 20 Folder 34
Fish laboratory exhibit, 1994.
Box 20 Folder 35
Fish stamps, 1974.
Box 20 Folder 36
Fish tank, circa 1979.
Box 20 Folder 37
Framing catalogs, circa 1982.
Box 20 Folder 38
Freeze-dried animals, 1972.
Box 20 Folder 39
Fuertes, 1997.
Box 20 Folder 40
Fuertes photo panels, circa 1997.
Box 20 Folder 41
Galapagos turtle, circa 1985.
Box 20 Folder 42
Gary, Jim - Metal Monsters, circa 1978.
Box 20 Folder 43
Glass flowers at Harvard, undated.
Box 20 Folder 44
Glass models, 1994.
Box 20 Folder 45
Green, Harold, undated.
Box 20 Folder 46
Habitat group preparation, undated.
Box 20 Folder 47
Habitat groups - historical record.
Box 20 Folder 48
Hall of Early Man, undated.
Box 20 Folder 49
Hall of Earth History, 1942.
Box 20 Folder 50
Handicapped, 1977-1979.
Box 20 Folder 51
Hardy, Steven, 1981, undated.
Box 20 Folder 52
Heyser landscaping, 1983-1985.
Box 20 Folder 53
Hornet and wasp nest exhibit, undated.
Box 20 Folder 54
Ichthyology library pictures, 1993.
Box 20 Folder 55
Indians, undated.
Box 20 Folder 56
Insect exhibit, undated.
Box 20 Folder 57-58
Jonas, Louis Paul, undated.
Box 20 Folder 59
Jonas, Louis Paul, circa 1991.
Box 20 Folder 60
Kassel, Eda, circa 1991.
Box 20 Folder 61
Lacawac, undated.
Box 20 Folder 62
Laessle, Albert, undated.
Box 20 Folder 63
Lance, Harry Jr., undated.
Box 20 Folder 64
Leaf making, undated.
Box 20 Folder 65
Leidy sculpture, undated.
Box 20 Folder 66
Library, undated.
Box 20 Folder 67
Liebrandt, Charles, circa 1986.
Box 20 Folder 68
Lobby bears, circa 1995.
Box 20 Folder 69
Mammal mounts, undated.
Box 21 Folder 1
Mammals, North American.
Box 21 Folder 2
Mammal photos, undated.
Box 21 Folder 3
Maps and globes, 1968-1969.
Box 21 Folder 4
Mineral Hall, undated.
Box 21 Folder 5
Mineralogy move, 1996.
Box 21 Folder 6
Plains of the Serengeti, circa 1991.
Box 21 Folder 7
Plans and maps - exhibits collections, undated.
Box 21 Folder 8
Python exhibit, undated.
Box 21 Folder 9
Ray, Christopher, 1977-1978.
Box 21 Folder 10
Ray, Christopher, 1989.
Box 21 Folder 11
River exhibit, undated.
Box 21 Folder 12
River Valley model images, undated.
Box 21 Folder 13
Rolywholyover - Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1995.
Box 21 Folder 14
Rosseau, undated.
Box 21 Folder 15
Rosenkranz, Clarence Clark, undated.
Box 21 Folder 16
Rubellite, 1982-1994.
Box 21 Folder 17
Rudd, Robert, 1990.
Box 21 Folder 18
Safari overnight, circa 1992.
Box 21 Folder 19
Schmid, Fred Jr., undated.
Box 21 Folder 20
Santens, Joseph - taxidermist, undated.
Box 21 Folder 21
Silhouettes, undated.
Box 21 Folder 22
Stoll, Frederick W., undated.
Box 21 Folder 23
Taxidermists, circa 1990.
Box 21 Folder 24
Thompson, Keith, 1994.
Box 21 Folder 25
Treasures of the Academy, 1982.
Box 21 Folder 26-33
Ulberg sculpture, circa 1985.
Box 21 Folder 34
Ulmer, Fred, 1995.
Box 21 Folder 35
Unicorn exhibit, 1982.
Box 21 Folder 36-40
Vanderbilt, George, undated.
Box 21 Folder 41
Vaux bust panel, undated.
Box 21 Folder 42
Vertebrate collections, undated.
Box 21 Folder 43
"What on Earth!" exhibit, undated.
Box 21 Folder 44
Weschler, Doug, 1995-1999.
Box 21 Folder 45
Wolf, Linda, 1997.
Box 21 Folder 46
Woodman, Phoebe, undated.
Box 21 Folder 47
Academy museum histories, undated.
Box 22 Folder 1-4
Annual Meeting notes, 1994-1997.
Box 22 Folder 5
Audio-Visual reports, undated.
Box 22 Folder 6
Computer project, 1982.
Box 22 Folder 7
Conservation information, undated.
Box 22 Folder 8
Deinonychus sculpture, circa 1987-1995.
Box 22 Folder 9-10
“Done!,” fulfilled loan agreements and program ideas, 1996-1997.
Box 22 Folder 11
Exhibition Committee, 1982-1983.
Box 22 Folder 12
Exhibits - Robert Peck, 1979-1983.
Box 22 Folder 13
Exhibits planning, 1977-1979.
Box 22 Folder 14
Fanfare, 1981.
Box 22 Folder 15
File list, undated.
Box 22 Folder 16-17
Fuertes exhibit project files, 1981-1985.
Box 22 Folder 18-43
Fuertes exhibit project files, 1981-1985.
Box 23 Folder 1-5
Future diorama ideas, circa 1992.
Box 23 Folder 6
Gemstone benches, 1994.
Box 23 Folder 7
Jurassic Park exhibit, 1993.
Box 23 Folder 8
Kozera, Kelly - the Dig, 1995.
Box 23 Folder 9
Labor summaries, 1980.
Box 23 Folder 10
Long range plan, 1994.
Box 23 Folder 11
New Era, undated.
Box 23 Folder 12
Old memos, 1995-1997.
Box 23 Folder 13
Old notes and meeting minutes, 1997-1998.
Box 23 Folder 14
Outside-In fossil sift, 1994.
Box 23 Folder 15
Pest problems, 1986.
Box 23 Folder 16
Pew administrative diorama database, 1992-1993.
Box 23 Folder 17
Prospective exhibitions, circa 1979.
Box 23 Folder 18
Removing fossil bones, 1992.
Box 23 Folder 19
Slides of exhibits (unlabeled), undated.
Box 23 Folder 20
Smithsonian Institute exhibit: "Seeds of Change", circa 1994.
Box 23 Folder 21
Society of Animal Artists files, circa 1981.
Box 23 Folder 22-28
Special needs box, 1994.
Box 23 Folder 29
Specimen information articles, undated.
Box 23 Folder 30
Temporary exhibits, circa 1960.
Box 23 Folder 31
Treasures of the Academy, 1982.
Box 23 Folder 32-33
Treasures of the Academy, 1996.
Box 23 Folder 34
Visitor survey, 1995.
Box 23 Folder 35
Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1995.
Box 23 Folder 36

Physical Description

Box 24, 25, 26

Special exhibits: 6-8370, 1987.
Box 24 Folder 1
Prints in progress: 1-7137, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 2
Discovering Dinosaurs contracts: 6-8535, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 3
Purchase orders and invoices: 6-8589, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 4-5
Aronson invoices, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 6
Income: 1-7137-87, 1987.
Box 24 Folder 7
Institute of Museum Services invoices: 8-7923, 1986-1987.
Box 24 Folder 8
Changing exhibits renovation: 1-7137-83, 1986-1987.
Box 24 Folder 9
Invoices: 1-7137-86, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 10
Funny side: 1-7137-87, 1987.
Box 24 Folder 11
Exploration, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 12
Exploring microspace, 1986.
Box 24 Folder 13
American Association of Museums meeting, 1981.
Box 24 Folder 14
Middle Creek Wildlife meeting area, undated.
Box 24 Folder 15
Wissahickon Watershed Association, undated.
Box 24 Folder 16
Windows and lobby exterior plans, 1983.
Box 24 Folder 17
Wildlife education, undated.
Box 24 Folder 18
Wagner Free Institute, undated.
Box 24 Folder 19
Varityper, 1983.
Box 24 Folder 20
Silk screen, undated.
Box 24 Folder 21
Timers, undated.
Box 24 Folder 22
Plant models - examples, 1984-1985.
Box 24 Folder 23
Photostat information, 1980-1985.
Box 24 Folder 24
Photographs and slides - animals, undated.
Box 24 Folder 25
Photographs and slides - catalogs, undated.
Box 24 Folder 26
Photo sources, undated.
Box 24 Folder 27
Pearl case, undated.
Box 24 Folder 28
Nature centers, undated.
Box 24 Folder 29
Muybridge, undated.
Box 24 Folder 30
Museum studies, undated.
Box 24 Folder 31
Museum maintenance, 1982-1984.
Box 24 Folder 32-33
Museum closure, 1982.
Box 24 Folder 34
Murals: Richard Rush Studios, 1982.
Box 24 Folder 35
Murals: Ely Kish, undated.
Box 24 Folder 36
Minerals - Treasures exhibit, 1980-1981.
Box 24 Folder 37
Mineral Hall proposal, 1981-1986.
Box 24 Folder 38
Mineral Hall - old drafts, 1980.
Box 24 Folder 39
Models - architectural, undated.
Box 24 Folder 40
Membership exhibit, undated.
Box 24 Folder 41-42
Map sources, 1985.
Box 24 Folder 43
Lighting, undated.
Box 24 Folder 44
Light box, undated.
Box 24 Folder 45
Educational pamphlets, undated.
Box 25 Folder 1
Inside Active Volcanoes, 1992.
Box 25 Folder 2
What on Earth!, 1991.
Box 25 Folder 3
Sharks! Facts and Fantasy, 1991.
Box 25 Folder 4
Insurance, 1990-1991.
Box 25 Folder 5
Bill of Rights exhibit, 1991-1993.
Box 25 Folder 6
Robotic dinosaurs, 1991.
Box 25 Folder 7
Pets and People, 1990-1991.
Box 25 Folder 8
Nature of Flavors - loans out, 1990.
Box 25 Folder 9
Darwin exhibit, 1989-1990.
Box 25 Folder 10
Cows, 1989-1990.
Box 25 Folder 11
The Confectioner's Art, 1989.
Box 25 Folder 12
Fine arts loans, 1989.
Box 25 Folder 13
Treasures of the Tar Pits, 1986-1989.
Box 25 Folder 14
Fine arts loans, 1988.
Box 25 Folder 15
Stripes and Spots and Disorderly Dots, 1988-1990.
Box 25 Folder 16
Dinosaurs Alive, 1988.
Box 25 Folder 17
Dinosaur portfolio, 1988.
Box 25 Folder 18
Fine arts loans, 1987.
Box 25 Folder 19
Angler's All, 1987-1988.
Box 25 Folder 20
One Hundred Seventy Fifth Anniversary exhibit, 1987-1988.
Box 25 Folder 21
Science into Art, 1987.
Box 25 Folder 22
Form and Flight in Birds - loans out, 1987-1988.
Box 25 Folder 23
Dolan exhibit, 1983-1990.
Box 25 Folder 24
We the People, 1987-1988.
Box 25 Folder 25
Shorebirds of North America, 1986.
Box 25 Folder 26
Fine arts loans, 1986.
Box 25 Folder 27
Discovering Dinosaurs loans, 1984-1986.
Box 25 Folder 28
Exhibit at Free Library, 1986.
Box 25 Folder 29
Fine arts loans, 1985.
Box 25 Folder 30
Audubon Two Hundredth Anniversary exhibit, 1985.
Box 25 Folder 31
Duck Stamps, 1984-1985.
Box 25 Folder 32
Outside-In, 1984-1985.
Box 25 Folder 33
Fuertes paintings, 1984.
Box 25 Folder 34
Fine arts loans, 1984.
Box 25 Folder 35
Flowers of Three Centuries, 1983.
Box 25 Folder 36
Conservation reports, 1983.
Box 25 Folder 37
Confiscated exhibit, 1983.
Box 25 Folder 38
Sable antelope, 1983-1984.
Box 25 Folder 39
Fine arts insurance, 1983-1984.
Box 25 Folder 40
Gem gallery, 1983-1984.
Box 25 Folder 41
Sex and Gluttony, 1985.
Box 25 Folder 42
A Celebration of Birds, undated.
Box 25 Folder 43
Treasures of the Academy, undated.
Box 25 Folder 44
Fine arts loans, 1982.
Box 25 Folder 45
Decoy Tradition, 1980-1989.
Box 25 Folder 46
Loans out, 1951.
Box 25 Folder 47
Endangered Species Hall, 1986.
Box 25 Folder 48
Unicorn exhibit, 1983.
Box 25 Folder 49
Fuertes paintings, 1978.
Box 25 Folder 50
Hawaii, 1977.
Box 25 Folder 51
The Look that Kills, 1977.
Box 25 Folder 52
Diorama plans, 1988.
Box 25 Folder 53
Institute for Museum Services, 1984-1989.
Box 25 Folder 54-75
Outside-In files, 1979-1994.
Box 26 Folder 1-20
Weekly staff meeting minutes and notes, 1984-1987.
Box 26 Folder 21-22
Exhibit proposals, 1979-1985.
Box 26 Folder 23
Collections inventory, 1983.
Box 26 Folder 24
Specimen information files, undated.
Box 26 Folder 25-32
Discovering Dinosauers exhibit, 1985-1986.
Box 26 Folder 33-34
Stream map of Pennsylvania, 1965.
Box 26 Folder 35
Diorama information, circa 1979-1983.
Box 26 Folder 36-37
Illustrator resumes, 1984-1987.
Box 26 Folder 38
Recycling exhibit production, 1977 October 4.
Box 26 Folder 39
Kisseloff, 1974.
Box 26 Folder 40
Nave, Fortson, Nicholson Designers, 1976.
Box 26 Folder 41
Lynch exhibits, 1976.
Box 26 Folder 42
In-House Space Committee, 1977-1978.
Box 26 Folder 43
African Hall renovations, 1976.
Box 26 Folder 44
African Hall labels, 1977.
Box 26 Folder 45-46
Mineral Hall, 1977.
Box 26 Folder 47
Finishing off, 1977.
Box 26 Folder 48
Recreation and boat show, 1978.
Box 26 Folder 49
Hawaii, 1977.
Box 26 Folder 50
175th Anniversary of ANSP, 1987.
Box 26 Folder 51
Guest book, Exhibits department, 1962-1979.
Box 26 Folder 52
Model cast collection inventories, circa 1930s-1940s.
Box 26 Folder 53
Newell, Eda Kassell, 1983-1984.
Box 26 Folder 54
Charles Knight’s models for the “Treasures” exhibit, circa 1962.
Box 26 Folder 55
Strata wall exhibit, circa 1985.
Box 26 Folder 56
Speciman survey, 1983.
Box 26 Folder 57
Exhibit plans, 1983.
Box 26 Folder 58

Discovering Dinosaurs, 1982.
Box 27 Folder 1
1983 January-June.
Box 27 Folder 2
1983 July-December.
Box 27 Folder 3
1984 January-June.
Box 27 Folder 4
1984 July-December.
Box 27 Folder 5
1985 January-August.
Box 27 Folder 6
1986.
Box 27 Folder 7
1986 July 1-December 30.
Box 27 Folder 8
Academy News (draft), 1984.
Box 27 Folder 9
Mark Adams, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 10
Alberto Dinos, 1981-1983.
Box 27 Folder 11
Bill Altimari, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 12
Peter Dodson, 1983.
Box 29 Folder 1
Peter Dodson continued, 1983.
Box 29 Folder 2
Dodson's Dino Data, 1985.
Box 29 Folder 3
Education, 1986.
Box 29 Folder 4
Education continued, 1986.
Box 29 Folder 5
Education Program, 1981-1983.
Box 29 Folder 6
Endothermy.
Box 29 Folder 7
Elasmosaurus, 1982.
Box 29 Folder 8
English Speaking Union, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 9
Evolution, 1983.
Box 29 Folder 10
Exhibit Fabricators, 1985.
Box 29 Folder 11
Reactions to Plans.
Box 29 Folder 12
Reactions to Schematics, July 18 1984.
Box 29 Folder 13
Staff Comments, August-September, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 14
Exhibit Sketches, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 15
Fairbanks Mural, 1980.
Box 29 Folder 16
Fanfare, 1983-1985.
Box 29 Folder 17
Field Museum, 1983.
Box 29 Folder 18
Formative Evaluation, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 19
Bill Gallagher, 1981-1983.
Box 29 Folder 25
Fossil Fling/How Formed, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 20
Fossil Mammals, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 21
Fossil Plants, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 22
A. Friedman, 1982-1987.
Box 29 Folder 23
Frontiers, 1975.
Box 29 Folder 24
Jim Gary- Dinos, 1978-1985.
Box 29 Folder 26
Geologic Time.
Box 29 Folder 27
Glenmede Trust Co., 1982.
Box 29 Folder 28
Glenmede Trust Co., 1982-1984.
Box 29 Folder 29
Glenmede Proposal, 1982.
Box 29 Folder 30
Donald Glut, 1983-1984.
Box 29 Folder 31
Stephen J. Gould, 1987-1989.
Box 29 Folder 32
Graduate Work, Vert. Paleo, 1982-1983.
Box 29 Folder 33
Codes/Size Chart, 1985.
Box 29 Folder 34
Old Graphics Schedules, 1985.
Box 29 Folder 35
Haddonfield Site Commemoration, 1984-1989.
Box 29 Folder 36
Hadrosaurus Foulkii Proposals, 1983.
Box 29 Folder 37
Hadrosaurus Foulkii Articles, 1989.
Box 29 Folder 38
Hadrosaurus Foulkii, Rush Studios, 1982-1983.
Box 29 Folder 39
Mark Hallett, 1985.
Box 29 Folder 40
Handicapped Access.
Box 29 Folder 41
Dean Hannotte, 1982.
Box 29 Folder 42
Hannotte's Memorabilia, 1982.
Box 29 Folder 43
Sidney Harris, 1985.
Box 29 Folder 44
Hawkins, BW, 1986.
Box 29 Folder 45
Hawkins Album, 1985-1986.
Box 29 Folder 46
Doug Henderson, 1983-1987.
Box 29 Folder 47
Sent to Hilferty, 1982-1984.
Box 29 Folder 48
Hilferty- Content Outline, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 49
Exhibit Concepts List, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 50
Hilferty Contract and Proposal, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 51
Description of Process, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 52
Hilferty- DD Bubble Diagrams, Content Org., 1984.
Box 29 Folder 53
Medi/Exhibit Ideas, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 54
Hilferty- Interviews/Concerns of Staff, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 55
Learning Objectives, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 56
Hilferty- Lobby Needs, 1984.
Box 29 Folder 57
Hilferty- Schedules.
Box 29 Folder 58
Concepts/Storyline, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 48
Computer Game, 1982-1984.
Box 27 Folder 47
Dino Steering Committee, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 46
Discovering Dinosaurs Committee, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 45
Eddie Cole, 1982.
Box 27 Folder 44
Edwin Colbert, 1982.
Box 27 Folder 43
Chronology/Justification, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 42
Chinese Dinosaurs, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 41
Chasmosaurs, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 40
Changing Exhibits Gallery, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 39
Case Statement, 1983-1984.
Box 27 Folder 38
Ken Carpenter, 1983-1984.
Box 27 Folder 37
Calvert Cliffs, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 36
Burian, 1982-1983.
Box 27 Folder 35
Budget continued, 1984-1985.
Box 27 Folder 34
Budget 1/2, 1984-1985.
Box 27 Folder 33
Matt Bruce, 1982.
Box 27 Folder 32
Britain Trip continued, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 31
Britain Trip, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 30
Brachyceratops, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 29
Gerard Booth File, 1982-1983.
Box 27 Folder 28
Bibliography continued, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 27
Bibliography, 1984.
Box 27 Folder 26
Berg, Eric, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 25
Mrs. Brandon Barringer, 1984-1985.
Box 27 Folder 24
Don Baird, 1982-1986.
Box 27 Folder 23
Avaceratops Labels, 1986.
Box 27 Folder 22
EIZ Habitat 1046.26 Insects.
Box 27 Folder 21
Authentication continued.
Box 27 Folder 20
Authentication, 1985.
Box 27 Folder 19
Audiovisual continued.
Box 27 Folder 18
Audiovisual, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 17
Architecture, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 16
Archaeopteryx, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 15
Apatosaurus/Brontosaurus, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 14
Allosaurus, 1983.
Box 27 Folder 13
Consultants, 1982-1983.
Box 28 Folder 1
Contracts, 1983-1984.
Box 28 Folder 2
Cope Marsh, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 3
Cope Marsh.
Box 28 Folder 4
Discovering Dinosaurs Correspondence: Complaints, 1986.
Box 28 Folder 5
Discovering Dinosaurs Correspondence: Appreciation, 1985-1986.
Box 28 Folder 6
Discovering Dinosaurs Correspondence: Requests for Information, 1985-1986.
Box 28 Folder 7
Corythosaurus Poems & Songs, 1983-1984.
Box 28 Folder 8
Czerkas (Es), 1982-1983.
Box 28 Folder 9
Allen Davis, 1982-1984.
Box 28 Folder 10
Deinonychos, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 11
Delaware Valley Paleo. Society, 1982-1987.
Box 28 Folder 12
Design Firms, 1983-1986.
Box 28 Folder 13
Dig-A-Fossil, 1985.
Box 28 Folder 14
Dinamations, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 15
D'Bilia Advertising, 1985.
Box 28 Folder 16
D'Bilia Misc., 1984.
Box 28 Folder 17
D'Bilia Misc., 1984.
Box 28 Folder 18
Dino Activities, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 19
Dino Articles, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 20
Dino Cards, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 21
D'Bilia Cards, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 22
Dino Cartoons, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 23
Dino Cartoons- Sidney Harris, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 24
Dino Political Cartoons.
Box 28 Folder 25
Dino Days Report, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 26
Dino Eggs.
Box 28 Folder 27
Dino Essay/Expedition, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 28
Dinosaur Expedition, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 29
Dino Footprints, 1983-1984.
Box 28 Folder 30
Dinosaur Fun Book, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 31
Dino Gala, 1985.
Box 28 Folder 32
Dino Hall, 1982-1984.
Box 28 Folder 33
Dinosaur Memorabilia, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 34
Dinosaur Memorabilia, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 35
Dino Lesson, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 36
Dinosaur Poems & Songs, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 37
Dino Postcards, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 38
Dino Sculptures, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 39
Dinosaurs, 1985.
Box 28 Folder 40
Dinosaurs, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 41
Dinosaurs: An Exhibition in the Making, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 42
Dinosaurs: An Exhibition in the Making- labels copy, 1984.
Box 28 Folder 43
Dinos in the News, 1979-1986.
Box 28 Folder 44
Diplodocus, 1983.
Box 28 Folder 45
Docent Program, 1985-1986.
Box 28 Folder 46
Dino Docent Program, 1981-1984.
Box 28 Folder 47
History of Pop Culture Content, 1985.
Box 30 Folder 1
Jack Horner, 1982-1983.
Box 30 Folder 2
Hot-Blooded Dinosaurs, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 3
Thomas Hughes, 1982-1983.
Box 30 Folder 4
Renzo Hutchinson, 1982.
Box 30 Folder 5
Human Evolution, 1982.
Box 30 Folder 6
Ichthyosaurus, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 7
Inquirer Dino Supplement, 1982.
Box 30 Folder 8
Investor's Briefing, 1985.
Box 30 Folder 9
Jim Jenson, 1983-1984.
Box 30 Folder 10
Sally Kohlstept, 1982-1985.
Box 30 Folder 11
Label Copy, 1/2, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 12
Label Copy 2/2, 1983-1984.
Box 30 Folder 13
Labels, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 14
Laelaps/Dryptosaurus, 1983-1986.
Box 30 Folder 15
J. Leidy, 1980-1990.
Box 30 Folder 16
Arnie Lewis, 1982-1983.
Box 30 Folder 17
Maisaura, 1983-1985.
Box 30 Folder 18
Mantell/Iguanodon, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 19
Marketable Products, 1980-1983.
Box 30 Folder 20
Robert Marler, 1982-1983.
Box 30 Folder 21
Men & Dinos, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 22
Models, 1985.
Box 30 Folder 23
Monthly Reports, 1985.
Box 30 Folder 24
Monthly Reports, 1984.
Box 30 Folder 25
Monthly Reports, 1983.
Box 30 Folder 26
Monthly Reports- Natural History Museum, 1985.
Box 30 Folder 27
Mosasaurus, 1986.
Box 30 Folder 28
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Implementation Grant #8-7915, 1979-1983.
Box 30 Folder 29
Planning Gr