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Miss Leslie's Magazine

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Held at: University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts [Contact Us]3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6206

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Miss Leslie's Magazine was a monthly women's magazine of literature and fashion published in Philadelphia from January of 1843 to July of 1846. In 1844 the magazine's name was changed to The Ladies' Magazine of Literature, Fashion, and the Fine Arts; in 1845 it was changed to Arthur's Ladies' Magazine, and it was subsequently merged with the popular Godey's Lady's Book in July of 1846 ( Oxford Companion to American Literature). Eliza Leslie was the original editor of the magazine, as well as a leading contributor, yet she retired by the end of the first year of publication. T.S. Arthur, a writer and contributor to Miss Leslie's Magazine as well as to Godey's, overtook the editorship until its eventual absorption by Godey's (Mott 734).

Eliza Leslie was a Philadelphia-born writer of popular cookbooks, children's stories, and guides for women on domestic life and work. She was born in 1787, the daughter of Robert Leslie, a watch-maker, and Lydia Baker. The family lived in Philadelphia excluding a 6 year stay in England in order for her father to export clocks to Philadelphia. Robert Leslie was a successful watch-maker and was friendly with Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, and became an elected member of the American Philosophical Society on Jefferson's recommendation. Eliza Leslie was educated in French and music by tutors in her home, and in sewing by her mother and in writing by her father. As a child Leslie's "chief delight was in reading and drawing", and she read all that she could and began writing verse at a young age (Haven 348).

Leslie's father died in 1803, and in order to support the family, Leslie and her mother opened a boardinghouse. Leslie then began attending the Philadelphia cooking school of Mrs. Goodfellow, during which time she formed her own collection of recipes based on her school notes. From this recipe collection grew Leslie's first book, Seventy-Five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats, which was published in 1827 by Munroe & Francis and became one of the most popular early American cookbooks (Bartlett). Encouraged by her publisher, Leslie began writing juvenile fiction and went on to publish many books of children's stories, such as The Mirror (1828), The Young Americans (1829), Stories for Emma (1829), and Atlantic Tales (1833). She began writing for adults when her story "Mrs. Washington Potts" was published in and won a prize from Godey's Lady's Book. Leslie was most financially successful with her cookbooks and domestic guides, such as The Domestic Cookery Book (1837), The House Book; or A Manual of Domestic Economy (1840), and The Lady's Receipt Book: A Useful Companion for Large or Small Families (1846) (Haven 349). Leslie was able to support herself solely through her writing. She lived during her later years at the United States Hotel in Philadelphia and was buried at St. Peter's churchyard in Philadelphia in 1858 (Haven 350).

Miss Leslie's Magazine incorporates Leslie's recipes and instructions for maintaining a household with fashion plates, essays, and stories and poems from contributing writers such as N.P. Willis, Lydia H. Sigourney, T. S. Arthur, Park Benjamin, and Miss Leslie.

This book contains volumes 1 and 2 of Miss Leslie's Magazine, dating from January 1843 to December 1843. The magazine was published monthly and each volume contains 6 issues. Each issue of Miss Leslie's Magazine contains several illustrated plates, short stories, poems, and one or more regular items such as "New Receipts, by Miss Leslie", "Female Health and Beauty", or "Things Worth Knowing, by Miss Leslie". Several of the stories are serialized and continue in numerous issues throughout the year. Some issues contain sewing patterns or instructions for completing domestic tasks. Several issues contain essays on topics such as writing, critical reading, or equestrianism. The six issues of the first volume contain general editorial remarks and comments on the illustrations on the first page as well as a note from the publisher, called variously "The Publisher to the Public" or "Publisher's Table", on the final page. The issues of the second volume most often do not contain these items, although one issue has a comment on a plate and one issue has a "Publisher's Table." The issues never include any advertisements.

Miss Leslie's Magazine prided itself on displaying new methods of illustration and using original art, yet maintaining an affordable cost to the reader. The publisher's comments on the plates in Miss Leslie's Magazine often provide information about the illustration technique, such as mezzotint and lithotint, as well as information about the artists and engravers. The lithographer P.S. Duval and the engraver John Sartain were two of the prominent Philadelphia artists to show their work in Miss Leslie's Magazine. Duval was the eminent lithographer in Philadelphia at the time, and he was one the first American lithographers to experiment with printing in color, rather than hand-coloring prints (Wainwright 61). The first color print appeared in the April 1843 issue of Miss Leslie's Magazine, "Grandpapa's Pet". This print was drawn and lithotinted by the artist John H. Richards and lithographed by Duval, and declared itself "the first specimen of this art ever produced in the United States". This first color print was printed with multiple colors on a single stone, which created color hues, but not bold colors; the prints were then hand-colored with brighter shades (Wainwright 61). The article "The New Art of Lithotint" in the April issue accompanies the print and extols the importance of the new process of color lithotint (113).

Another notable set of plates, from the January 1843 issue, is comprised of a fashion plate of a woman in "a dress of grey merino [with] a short cloak of purple velvet", yet in place of her face is a round cut-out in the plate. The following fashion plate shows a woman in an "evening dress of gros d'Afrique" and her face is aligned so as to appear as the face for both plates. The opening comment of this issue explains "to show the effect of the colour and costume upon complexion, we have caused our fashion plates for the present month to be arranged in a novel and ingenious manner, such as has not before been attempted in this country; nor, so far as we know, in any other, except in costly books of which the edition is very limited" (6). The issues of Miss Leslie's Magazine also contain brightly colored engravings by John Sartain, embossed plates, illustrated patterns, and every issue contains at least one fashion plate.

This collection is arranged into six series: "Stories," "Poems," "Articles and Essays," "Patterns, Receipts, and Directions," "Columns," and "Plates." The pieces are arranged in the order they appear in the issues and chronologically within each series.

This collection offers a view into Victorian America women's domestic life and work, as well as displaying the literary, fashion, and artistic tastes of the day. The publisher's comments and the illustrations offer insight into the publishing and printing trends and technologies active during that time. Miss Leslie's Magazine, despite its brief success, played an important role in the publishing history of Philadelphia.

Haven, Alice B. "Personal Reminisces of Miss Eliza Leslie." Godey's Lady's Book and Magazine 56 (1858): 344-350. American Periodicals Series Online. Web. 7 June 2012. "Miss Leslie's Magazine". The Oxford Companion to American Literature. James D. Hart, ed., rev. Phillip W. Leininger. Oxford University Press 1995. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 6 June 2012. Mott, Frank Luther. History of American Magazines: 1741-1850. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1930. Virginia K. Bartlett. "Leslie, Eliza". The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America. Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford University Press, 2003. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 6 June 2012. Wainwright, Nicholas B. Philadelphia in the Romantic Age of Lithography. Philadelphia: The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1958.

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University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
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The processing of this collection was made possible through generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, administered through the Council on Library and Information Resources' "Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives" Project.
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The Maiden's Choice. By T.S. Arthur, 1843.
Month January Page 6
A Dream, from the German of Richter. By Ellen Warburton, 1843.
Month January Page 8
Helen Wittingham; or the Glass of Water. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month January Page 9
Chapter List:
    Missing Title
  1. January, p. 9
  2. February, p. 54
Harriet Butler; or, Where There is a Will, There is a Way. By Mrs. Anna Bache, 1843.
Month January Page 12
Claudia. By Virginia Murray, 1843.
Month January Page 14
Cecilia Howard: or the Young Lady who had Finished her Education. By T.S. Arthur, 1843.
Month January Page 19
Chapter List:
    Missing Title
  1. January, p. 19
  2. February, p. 65
  3. March, p. 92
  4. April, p. 132
  5. May, p. 167
  6. June, p. 203
  7. July, p. 18
  8. August, p. 39
  9. September, p. 73
  10. October, p. 110
  11. November, p. 163
  12. December, p. 197
Pauline. By Mrs. E. Scaife, 1843.
Month January Page 23
The Widow's Last Trial. By Mrs. N. Sargent, 1843.
Month January Page 27
The Venetian Glass. By the Baroness de Carabrella, 1843.
Month January Page 33
The Teacher. By Mrs. S.C. Hall, 1843.
Month January Page 35
Romance and Reality. By T.S. Arthur, 1843.
Month February Page 42
Two Scenes in the Life of Anna Boleyn, 1843.
Month February Page 48
Mary Montrose, the School's Darling. By Mrs. N. Sargent, 1843.
Month February Page 53
Jessy. A Tale of Old London Bridge. By N. Michell, 1843.
Month February Page 58
The Scotch Syllabub, 1843.
Month February Page 69
The Two Maidens. By T.S. Arthur, 1843.
Month March Page 80
Orphelina. A Tale. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month March Page 86
Chapter List:
    Missing Title
  1. March, p. 86
  2. April, p. 115
  3. May, p. 153
  4. June, p. 215
  5. July, p. 9
  6. August, p. 35
  7. September, p. 69
  8. October, p. 105
  9. November, p. 151
  10. December, p. 201
Genius in Fetters. By Louis Fitzgerald Tasistro, 1843.
Month March Page 97
The Stone-Cutters Boy of Possagno. A Sketch from his Life. By Miss Grace Aguilar, 1843.
Month March Page 101
The White Lady, or The Haunted House. By Mrs. N. Sargent, 1843.
Month March Page 105
The Fifth Wind. From the French of the Vicomte d'Arlincourt, 1843.
Month March Page 108
The Pigmies and the Flasks. A German Legend. From the French of the Vicomte d'Arlincourt, 1843.
Month April Page 120
True Magnanimity. Translated from the German of Schiller by Miss Mary Davenant, 1843.
Month April Page 123
That Eighteen Pence. From the French. By Hall Grandgent, 1843.
Month April Page 125
A Night at St. Germains. A Sketch. By Mrs. M. A. Ford, 1843.
Month April Page 136
The Stolen Match. By Mrs. M. H. Reyburn, 1843.
Month April Page 139
Mahala. A Legend of New Jersey. By M. A. Ford, 1843.
Month May Page 157
The Stolen Match. By M. H. Reyburn, 1843.
Month May Page 161
The Bronze Soldier. A German Tradition, 1843.
Month May Page 171
The Monomaniac. By T. S. Arthur, 1843.
Month May Page 174
The Cure of Vanity. Translated from the German of Mahlmann, 1843.
Month May Page 177
Woman's True Duty. By Miss Eliza M. Langley, 1843 June.
Month June Page 185
Vision on the Field of Battle near Dresden. From the German. By Hall Grandgent, 1843.
Month June Page 192
Rosa Ruffin. By Miss E. H. Russell Wills, 1843.
Month June Page 197
The Prince Bambu and the Princess Zoraide. Translated from the German of Mahlmann, 1843.
Month June Page 209
Chapter List:
    Missing Title
  1. June, p. 209
  2. July, p. 14
Which Was I?, 1843.
Month July Page 21
The Relations of Circumstance; A Tale. From the French of the Count de Sarrasin, by Hall Grandgent, 1843.
Month July Page 25
Marguerite Delrive, 1843.
Month August Page 47
The Three Girdles. A Tale. From the French, by Hall Grandgent, 1843.
Month August Page 54
The Letter of Recommendation. By T. S. Arthur, 1843.
Month August Page 60
Harry Edwards, or the Fortune-Hunter, 1843.
Month August Page 63
The Strange Guest. From the German of the Baron de la Motte Fouque, 1843.
Month September Page 77
The Duchess of Nusseldorff. Translated from the French, by Esther Wetherald, 1843.
Month September Page 83
Baldassere de Lama. From the Italian--by Hall Grandgent, 1843.
Month September Page 91
The Gipsy's Lost Child. By Henry Penquick, Esq, 1843.
Month September Page 93
Jessy of Kibe's Farm. By Miss M. R. Mitford, 1843.
Month September Page 96
The First Time of Asking, 1843.
Month September Page 99
The Peri's Ransom. An Eastern Tale. From the French. By Hall Grandgent, 1843.
Month October Page 113
Renting a House, 1843.
Month October Page 121
The Father's Curse. By the Author of "The Tailor's Apprentice", 1843.
Month October Page 124
Chapter List:
    Missing Title
  1. October, p. 124
  2. November, p. 147
A Legend of Kempshot. By William H. Carpenter, 1843.
Month October Page 129
Caroline Graydon; or Reminiscences of a Philadelphia Physician, 1843.
Month October Page 132
Chapter List:
    Missing Title
  1. October, p. 132
  2. November, p. 141
Mrs. Todd, 1843.
Month November Page 168
The Biter Bitten, or A New Way to Collect a Bill, 1843.
Month November Page 170
The Wife, that was Never Known to be Angry. From the French, by Mary E. Lee, 1843.
Month November Page 173
The Bird of Erie. A Legend of the Lake. By Izaak Inkle, 1843.
Month December Page 177
The Foreign Sibyl and the British Statesmen, 1843.
Month December Page 186
Retrenchment: or, Cutting the Coat According to the Cloth, 1843.
Month December Page 188
Alice Gray. A Tale, 1843.
Month December Page 191
The Maiden's Wise Thought. By Mrs. S. C. Hall, 1843.
Month December Page 208

To a Sister. By Mrs. E.C. Embury, 1843.
Month January Page 8
Italy. By Mrs. E.C. Embury, 1843.
Month January Page 13
New-Year's Day. In Imitation of "Le Compte de Ségur". By Hon. John Bouvier, 1843.
Month January Page 16
The Sisters. By Mrs. L.H. Sigourney, 1843.
Month January Page 16
The Butterfly, 1843.
Month January Page 22
The Last Journey, 1843.
Month January Page 26
Poetry. By Mrs. Whitman, 1843.
Month January Page 28
The Ruins of Fort Putnam at West Point. By Dr. Vangelder; of New York, 1843.
Month January Page 34
Zuleika's Song. From the Spanish of Zamora. By Miss Virginia Deforrest, 1843.
Month January Page 37
To a Mocking Bird in the City. By Mrs. Gilman, 1843.
Month January Page 37
To a Star, 1843.
Month February Page 47
Charade. By Mrs. Abdy, 1843.
Month February Page 50
Alone. By Mrs. Anna Bache, 1843.
Month February Page 50
Mount Auburn. By Miss Mary Ann Browne, sister to Mrs. Hemens, 1843.
Month February Page 52
Oh! No, We Never Talk in French. Altered by Miss Leslie from an anonymous parody on a popular song, 1843.
Month February Page 57
Album Poetry. By Solomon Serious, 1843.
Month February Page 60
The Questions. By WM. H. Carpenter, 1843.
Month February Page 64
Blackhawk's Last Request. By WM. H. Carpenter, 1843.
Month February Page 71
The Kensington Elm, or William Penn's Tree, 1843.
Month February Page 73
American Antiquities, 1843.
Month February Page 75
Lines from Byron's Ode to Napoleon, omitted by the English Publishers, 1843.
Month February Page 75
The School Girl Watching the Stars. By A.A. Muller, D.D., of the Lutheran Church, 1843.
Month March Page 79
Impromptu on a Tax Gatherer. By Theodor Hook, 1843.
Month March Page 79
Saturday Evening; or The Country Boy Washed by his Elder Sister. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month March Page 85
The Artist's Widow. Written after the death of Opie the painter, by his no-less-distinguished wife, 1843.
Month March Page 85
Niagara, 1843.
Month March Page 85
The Picture of Helen, 1843.
Month March Page 91
The Switzer, 1843.
Month March Page 96
Marriage, 1843.
Month March Page 96
The Graves of the Signers. By Miss Buchanan of Baltimore--now Mrs. Annan, 1843.
Month March Page 100
The Mother of the Gracchi. By Mrs. A.M. Wells, 1843.
Month March Page 104
Mary. By S. Swain, Jr, 1843.
Month April Page 114
Napoleon, 1843.
Month April Page 114
Scott and Shakespeare. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month April Page 119
The Children of Henry the First. By Mrs. L.H. Sigourney, 1843.
Month April Page 124
The Black Fox. A Legend of Connecticut, 1843.
Month April Page 128
Epitaph on a Wife by Her Affectionate Husband., 1843.
Month April Page 131
The Cross of the South. By Mrs. Hemans, 1843.
Month April Page 135
On the Birth-day of My Wife. By W. D., 1843.
Month April Page 138
The Cause of the Revolution. Old Song, 1843.
Month April Page 138
Seventeen. By Mrs. Caroline Gilman, 1843.
Month April Page 145
The French in La Mancha. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month April Page 148
Mount Vernon. By John Searson, 1843.
Month May Page 152
Mr. Searson's Visit to Alexandria. By John Searson, 1843.
Month May Page 152
The Painted Window. By J. Keats, 1843.
Month May Page 156
Unwelcome Spring, 1843.
Month May Page 160
The Midnight Review, 1843.
Month May Page 166
The Dying Father, 1843.
Month May Page 166
The Men of '76. By M'Lellan, 1843.
Month May Page 170
The Meeting of the Flowers. By Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, 1843.
Month May Page 173
The Far West, 1843.
Month May Page 173
"How D'ye Do" and "Good Bye", 1843.
Month May Page 184
The Dying Girl. By Mrs. C. Gore, 1843.
Month June Page 191
The Sea-Officer's Adieu, 1843.
Month June Page 191
Sunset at Rome. A Prize Poem. By A. A. Muller, D.D., of the Lutheran Church, 1843.
Month June Page 196
The Prayer on Bunker Hill. By Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, 1843.
Month June Page 202
To a Young Friend. By Marion H. Rand, 1843.
Month June Page 206
Lines on Leaving Boston. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month June Page 208
On Viewing the Outlet of Niagara River. By M. A. Ford, 1843.
Month June Page 208
The Thunder Storm at Midnight, 1843.
Month June Page 214
To Mary, for her Album. By Mrs. M. A. Potts, 1843.
Month June Page 219
Lines Written by Sir Walter Raleigh the Evening before his Execution, 1843.
Month June Page 219
Canute on the Sea Shore, 1843.
Month July Page 17
The Revolutionary Officer. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month July Page 24
Marie Antoinette to her Children. By Dr. Wolcott, 1843.
Month July Page 24
The Scar of Lexington. By Miss H. F. Gould, 1843.
Month July Page 28
The Tired Hunter. By Park Benjamin, 1843.
Month July Page 28
Death. By William B. O. Peabody, 1843.
Month August Page 34
Ballad. By Mrs. Anna Bache, 1843.
Month August Page 34
Midshipman Merry's Lament for Long Tom Coffin. By John G. C. Brainard, 1843.
Month August Page 38
The Pilgrim Fathers. By the Rev. John Pierpont, 1843.
Month August Page 38
The Grave of Franklin, 1843.
Month August Page 43
New Partners. By Louisa Sheridan, 1843.
Month August Page 46
England and America. By Washington Allston, 1843.
Month August Page 46
A Fragment, written in one of the chambers of a strange hotel in a strange city, at midnight. By T. S. Arthur, 1843.
Month September Page 72
Summer Afternoon, 1843.
Month September Page 72
The Motherless Babe. By Marion H. Rand, 1843.
Month September Page 76
Leigh Hunt's Letter to Charles Lamb, 1843.
Month September Page 76
The New England Pilgrim's Funeral. By John H. Bryant, 1843.
Month September Page 82
The American Flag. By Joseph Rodman Drake, 1843.
Month September Page 82
The Vane on the Steeple. By Albert G. Greene, 1843.
Month September Page 90
Nature. From Goethe.
Month September Page 95
The Snow Bird.
Month September Page 95
America.
Month September Page 98
Dinner Eating. By Leigh Hunt, 1843.
Month October Page 109
The Household Woman. By Mrs. Caroline Gilman, 1843.
Month October Page 109
The Sea-Boy's Farewell, 1843.
Month October Page 116
He Came Too Late. By Miss Elizabeth Bogart, 1843.
Month October Page 120
The Second Marriage. By T. U. Bright, 1843.
Month October Page 128
The Harvest Girls of Switzerland, 1843.
Month October Page 131
The Brothers, 1843.
Month October Page 137
The Grave of Burns, 1843.
Month November Page 158
The Soldier's Orphan. By J. Thelwall, 1843.
Month November Page 167
The Mechanic, 1843.
Month November Page 172
Food of the Plymouth Colonists--1623. From the First Poem Composed in America, 1843.
Month November Page 174
Printing. "The Art that Preserves all Arts", 1843.
Month November Page 176
The Dying Year. By Mrs. S. J. Hale, 1843.
Month December Page 185
The Death of a Loved One, 1843.
Month December Page 185
Art. By Charles Sprague, 1843.
Month December Page 190
Christmas in the North of England. By W. Wordsworth, 1843.
Month December Page 200
The American Eagle, 1843.
Month December Page 200
The Twenty-Second of December, or, The Landing of the Pilgrims. By W. C. Bryant, 1843.
Month December Page 212

Hints to Novices in Writing for the Press. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month January Page 17
Condescension. By Louis Fitzgerald Tasistro, 1843.
Month January Page 31
Fading Flowers. A Lesson of Patience, 1843.
Month February Page 51
Poetic Reading. By Edwin Harwood, 1843.
Month February Page 61
Traits of the Arabs, 1843.
Month March Page 83
The New Art of Lithotint, 1843.
Month April Page 113
Satirical Fiction. By Louis Fitzgerald Tasistro, 1843.
Month April Page 130
On Letters. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month August Page 44
Crossing the Atlantic. By Miss Leslie.
Month September Page 87
The Keys of the Piano. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month October Page 137
Female Equestrianism, 1843.
Month November Page 156

Directions for Working Slippers. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month March Page 77
Directions for Making a Tabouret. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month March Page 78
New Receipts. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month April Page 146
Appears in:
    Missing Title
  1. April, p. 146
  2. June, p. 194
  3. August, p. 68
  4. September, p. 102
  5. October, p. 138
  6. December, p. 211
Directions for Braiding. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month May Page 151
Hints for Improving the Hair. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month May Page 160
Lace and Lace-washing. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month May Page 180
The Summer Hearth. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month June Page 207
The Tool Closet. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month July Page 31
Receipt for Baked Clams. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month July Page 32
Picture Hints. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month November Page 174
Fine Receipt for Curing Four Large Hams. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month November Page 176
Female Hair; Natural and Artificial. By Leigh Hunt, 1843.
Month December Page 196

Female Health and Beauty--Cosmetics and Cleanliness. By Mrs. A. Walker, 1843.
Month January Page 39
Appears in:
    Missing Title
  1. January, p. 39
  2. February, p. 74
Things Worth Knowing. By Miss Leslie, 1843.
Month January Page 38
Appears in:
    Missing Title
  1. January, p. 38
  2. February, p. 72
  3. March, p. 111
  4. May, p. 183
  5. July, p. 29
  6. September, p. 104
  7. October, p. 139
  8. November, p. 175
Stray Leaves from an Old Port-folio. By George Goldsborough, 1843.
Month February Page 63
Appears in:
    Missing Title
  1. February, p. 63
  2. April, p. 144
  3. June, p. 193
  4. October, p. 117
  5. November, p. 159

Fashion Plate, 1843.
Month January Plate 1
Illustrated title page, 1843.
Month January Plate 2
The Happy Family, mezzotint by Sartain expressly for Miss Leslie's Magazine, 1843.
Month January Plate 3
The Champion, 1843.
Month January Plate 4
Fashion plate, a dress of grey merino, 1843.
Month January Plate 5
Fashion plate, evening dress of white gros d'Afrique, 1843.
Month January Plate 6
Floral lace design, 1843.
Month January Plate 7
Romance & Reality, mezotint expressly for Miss Leslie's Magazine by Sartain, 1843.
Month February Plate 8
Embossed pattern, with a moss rose centre, 1843.
Month February Plate 9
Embossed portrait, of Chief Red Jacket, 1843.
Month February Plate 10
The Pets. Printed by Edwin Landseer. Engraved by John Sartain, 1843.
Month March Plate 11
Berlin worsted pattern for slippers, 1843.
Month March Plate 12
The Promenade, portrait of Princess Esterhazy, 1843.
Month March Plate 13
Grandpapa's Pet. Drawn & lithotinted by John H. Richards, expressly for Miss Leslie's Magazine, the first specimen of this art ever produced in the United States. Lith. of P.S. Duval, 1843.
Month April Plate 14
Fashion Plate. Thos. Sinclair's Lith. & Tint, Phila, 1843.
Month April Plate 15
The Jewels, 1843.
Month April Plate 16
The City Belle, 1843.
Month May Plate 17
The Rustic Maid, 1843.
Month May Plate 18
Shaded Braiding Pattern for the cloth cover of a tabouret--or of a music-stool. Drawn by E. Leslie, 1843.
Month May Plate 19
The Hope of the House. Painted by F. Tayler, engraved by A. L. Dick, 1843.
Month May Plate 20
The Lady's Toilet, 1843.
Month June Plate 21
Fashion Plate. Engraved by F. Humphrys, 1843.
Month June Plate 22
A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society (of Newfoundland). Mezzotint by W.E. Tucker after E & T Landseer, 1843.
Month July Plate 23
Genevieve. (Illustrated poem), 1843.
Month July Plate 24-27
Belisarius. Engraved expressly for Miss Leslie's Magazine by A. Spencer, 1843.
Month August Plate 28
Fashion Plate, 1843.
Month August Plate 29
Esmeralda. Engraved expressly for Miss Leslie's Magazine, 1843.
Month September Plate 30
Fashion Plate, 1843.
Month September Plate 31
Sympathy. Engraved for Miss Leslie's Magazine, 1843.
Month October Plate 32
The Four Seasons. (Illustrated poem), 1843.
Month October Plate 33-36
Fashion Plate, 1843.
Month October Plate 37
The Dying Favorite. For Miss Leslie's Magazine, 1843.
Month November Plate 38
Fashion Plate, 1843.
Month November Plate 39
The Village Beauty, 1843.
Month December Plate 40
Fashion Plate. Printed in colours by P. S. Duvall, expressly for Miss Leslie's Magazine, 1843.
Month December Plate 41

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